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Old November 22nd, 2018 #39
littlefieldjohn
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littlefieldjohn
Default Study: Jewish Lobby Neocon US Wars Have Cost $5.9 trillion, 1 Million Dead Since 2001

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Study: Jewish Lobby Neocon US Wars Have Cost $5.9 trillion, 1 Million Dead Since 2001



The wars waged by America on behalf of the pro-Israel Jewish lobby neocons since 2001 have cost $5.9 trillion and killed at least one million people, including nearly 15,000 Americans, a new study has revealed.


https://watson.brown.edu/files/watso...0FY2019%20.pdf

Issued by the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University and titled “The most recent study from the Costs of War Project, United States Budgetary Costs of the Post-9/11 Wars Through FY2019: $5.9 Trillion Spent and Obligated,” the study said that the “US military is conducting counterterror activities in 76 countries, or about 39 percent of the world’s nations, vastly expanding [its mission] across the globe.”

In addition, these operations “have been accompanied by violations of human rights and civil liberties, in the US and abroad.”

Overall, researchers estimated that “between 480,000 and 507,000 people have been killed in the United States’ post-9/11 wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.”

This toll does not include
the more than 500,000 deaths from the war in Syria, raging since 2011” when a West-backed "rebel" and jihadi terrorist uprising challenged the government.


(That same year, the U.S.-led NATO Western military alliance intervened in Libya and helped "insurgents" overthrow longtime leader Muammar el-Qaddafi, leaving the nation in an ongoing state of civil war.
)



The combined human cost for the U.S. throughout its actions in Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan was 6,951 troops, 21 civilians and 7,820 contractors.

“While we often know how many US soldiers die, most other numbers are to a degree uncertain. Indeed, we may never know the total direct death toll in these wars.


“In addition, this tally does not include ‘indirect deaths.’ Indirect harm occurs when wars’ destruction leads to long term, ‘indirect,’ consequences for people’s health in war zones, for example because of loss of access to food, water, health facilities, electricity or other infrastructure,” it added.

The $5.9 trillion U.S. cost includes Pentagon spending through fiscal year 2019, such as direct and indirect spending as well as future war-related costs for post-9/11 war veterans. It represents U.S. spending in the war zones of Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan and other locations designated as “overseas contingency operations.”


It also includes war-related spending by other agencies, such as the State Department and the Department of Homeland Security, costs of veterans care as well as debt used to pay for the wars.

“Veterans benefits and disability spending, and the cost of interest on borrowing to pay for the wars, will comprise an increasingly large share of the costs,” said Neta Crawford, a political science professor at the institute, who authored the study.

Even if the wars were to end by 2023, the United States is on track to spend an additional $808 billion, bringing the overall tally to at least $6.7 trillion, according to the study. That doesn’t include future interest payments on the spending.

War appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan are funded by deficit spending and borrowing, and not new taxes or war bonds, the study notes. This adds to interest costs, it concludes.

Those interest payments could shift with the winds of the economy and other factors, with some experts estimating those fees alone could total trillions.

“The U.S. continues to fund the wars by borrowing, so this is a conservative estimate of the consequences of funding the war as if on a credit card, in which we are only paying interest even as we continue to spend,” Crawford said.

“In sum, high costs in war and war-related spending pose a national security concern because they are unsustainable,” Crawford said.

“The public would be better served by increased transparency and by the development of a comprehensive strategy to end the wars and deal with other urgent national security priorities.”

The study also tallied the number of soldiers and sailors injured in the wars. Since 2001, more than 53,700 U.S. service members have been injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of those injuries, 62 percent were hurt in Iraq, while 38 percent were injured in Afghanistan.
http://newobserveronline.com/study-j...#comment-37853