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Old March 17th, 2008 #2
Diana400
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Location: living in Belgium for last 10 years
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Diana400
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Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post


Although most of Taki's writings concern his life among the rich and famous, his political views always find their way into the text. His politics may be safely placed on the Right, but he holds controversial, sometimes close to contradictory, views on many subjects, a fact which makes many conservatives and right-wingers unwilling to associate with his positions. In his Spectator pieces, Taki comes across as a staunch defender of family values, yet he admits to actively pursuing wives he found attractive; he values friendship and comradeship, but some of the men he "cuckolded" (his expression) were close friends; he professes Christianity, but supports abortion rights and admits to violating most of the Church's commandments; he is strongly pro-American, but usually writes dismissively of American foreign policy; he is a fierce anti-communist, but has "no time" for the new Russian rich, whom he collectively labels "kleptocrats" and "nouveau-Russes"; he is a confirmed elitist and opponent of mass vulgarity, but reserves his harshest invective for the spoiled rich—among whom he admits he belongs; and so on. Consistently, nonetheless, Taki takes traditionalist, royalist and paleoconservative positions.

Taki is an outspoken critic of the current Iraq War and lays the blame for the "fiasco", as he calls it, on American neoconservatives, who have "destroyed the legacy of Ronald Reagan", levying harsh criticism on people like David Frum, William Kristol, and John Podhoretz. He considers war supporter Christopher Hitchens to be among "the former Trotskyites now masquerading as patriotic Americans". (Hitchens, originally British, is now a naturalised American.)

Taki is vocal in his criticism of vulgarity in both the media and in professional sports, but occasionally uses profanity himself in interviews, and says this is because he went "through hell" in the Navy.[2] Some of his more controversial statements are to be found in his articles on contemporary immigration policy (see below).

He was prominent in the campaign to free the former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, whose arrest he considered inconsistent with international law. [3]