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Old October 6th, 2007 #1
Michael S. Burks
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Default Great White Athletes

You know, I am sick of sports making it seem that blacks and other non-whites dominate. That is the biggest lie ever taught.


Look at the NFL. The mass majority of pro-bowl Quarterbacks are white. About half of the best offensive linemen are white. And there are still a lot of great white linebackers and tight ends in the NFL.


In the MBL, most great pitchers are white. Even since 1947 when blacks were allowed to play, very few black pitchers have ever came along. The majority of catchers are white. And all-star whites still play at every position in baseball.


Take away Tiger Woods, and golf is still dominated by whites. And the history proves that whites have always dominated that sport. Tiger Woods however, isn’t even full blooded – he’s half Asian.

Hockey is about as white as you can get. The only sport more white is NASCAR. Very few blacks have even made it to the NHL.

Look at coaching of all sports. Even the so-called “nigger dominated” sports best coaches are white. Of course it takes brains to coach – something niggers normally don’t have.

And the list of great White Athletes goes on and one. I am going to create this thread and add great players/coaches of sports. I hope others will add the names of others to create a neat thread with the history of great White Athletes.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #2
Michael S. Burks
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Default Ty Cobb

Ty Cobb is one of the greatest baseball players even to this day. Most consider him to be the best baseball hitter before the 1920’s which was known as the “Dead Ball Era”.

Cobb is widely credited with setting 90 baseball records during his career.He still holds several records as of 2007, including the highest MLB career batting average .366 and most career batting titles with 12 (or 11, depending on source).He retained many other records for almost a half century or more, including most career major league hits until 1985 (4,191 or 4,189, depending on source),[10][11] most career runs (2,245 or 2,246 depending on source) until 2001,most career games played (3,035) and at bats (11,429 or 11,434 depending on source) until 1974,and the modern record for most career stolen bases (892) until 1977.



 
Old October 6th, 2007 #3
Michael S. Burks
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Default Larry Bird

Larry Bird in many polls is considered one of the top 5 players of all time in the NBA. He was a great all around shooter. During a time when white players were in a decline, Bird won 3 MVP’s and helped the Boston Celtics win 3 NBA Championships.

Bird scored 24.3 points per game in his career on a high .496 field goal average, a stellar .886 free throw average (9th best all-time) and a .376 percentage on 3-point shots. Bird was also a good rebounder (10.0 rebound career average) and an excellent playmaker (6.3 assist career average). His multidimensional game made him a consistent triple-double threat; Bird currently ranks fifth all-time in triple-doubles with 59, not including the 10 he recorded in the playoffs. Bird's lifetime player efficiency rating (PER) is 23.5, 16th all-time, a further testament to his all around game.[6] Bird's high free throw percentage is due in no small part to the fact that when he was a boy, he used to shoot 200 free throws before school, every day, according to a late 1990s Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance commercial with Larry himself.


 
Old October 6th, 2007 #4
Demonica
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So far the MMA world has been dominated by this man, a Russian by the name of Fedor Emelianenko:


Check out some of his highlight reels on Youtube for awesome nigger-destroying action.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #5
Michael S. Burks
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Default Red Grange

Grange was one of College Football's greatest players of any era. He played numerous positions on both defense and offense.


Grange vaulted to national prominence as a result of his performance in the October 18, 1924, game against Michigan. This was the grand opening game for the new Memorial Stadium, built as a memorial to University of Illinois students and alumni that served in World War I. He returned the opening kickoff for a 95-yard touchdown, and scored three more touchdowns on runs of 67, 56 and 45 yards in the first twelve minutes. This four-touchdown first quarter outburst equaled the number of touchdowns allowed by Michigan in the previous two seasons. After sitting out the second quarter, Grange returned in the second half, contributing two additional touchdowns, for a nigh-unheard-of grand total of six touchdowns in a single game.



He signed with the NFL's Chicago Bears the day after his last college game; player/manager George Halas agreed to a contract for a 19-game barnstorming tour which earned Grange a salary and share of gate receipts that amounted to $100,000, during an era when typical league salaries were less than $100/game. That 67-day tour is credited with legitimizing professional football in the United States. In the 1920s, college football was far more popular than professional football. Fans preferred cheering on a college alma mater than professional paid athletes. Grange is credited with changing that view and bringing professional football into the mainstream.

On December 6, 1925, more than 65,000 showed up at the Polo Grounds to watch Grange, helping save the New York Giants' franchise. Grange scored a touchdown on a 35-yard interception return in the Bears' 19-7 victory. Offensively, he ran for 53 yards on 11 carries, caught a 23-yard pass and completed 2-of-3 passes for 32 yards.

Grange became involved in a dispute with the Bears and left to form his own league, the American Football League, to challenge the NFL. The league only lasted one season, after which Grange's team, the New York Yankees, was assimilated into the NFL. Grange suffered a serious knee injury against the Bears, which robbed him of some speed and his cutting ability. After sitting out 1928, Grange returned to the Bears, where he was a solid runner and excellent defensive back through the 1934 season.

The two highlights of Grange's later NFL years came in consecutive championship games. In the unofficial 1932 championship, Grange caught the game winning touchdown pass from Bronko Nagurski. In the 1933 championship, Grange made a touchdown saving tackle that saved the game and the title for the Bears.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #6
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How about Bret Farve? He just broke some kind of record for most touch down passes and many more.

You all hear about that Nigress Olympic gold medal winner getting stripped of itz medals?
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"What do you expect? All we got on this team are a bunch a Jews, spics, niggers, pansies -- and a booger-eatin' moron!"

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Old October 6th, 2007 #7
Michael S. Burks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burnjewburn View Post
How about Bret Farve? He just broke some kind of record for most touch down passes and many more.
Believe it or not, he's 1/4 American Indian. That is not white enough as far as I am concerned.


Quote:
You all hear about that Nigress Olympic gold medal winner getting stripped of itz medals?
Yup, after she lied and lied about not taking drugs. Oh well, I hope she has a nice six months in jail.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #8
McKinley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael S. Burks View Post
Believe it or not, he's 1/4 American Indian. That is not white enough as far as I am concerned.




Yup, after she lied and lied about not taking drugs. Oh well, I hope she has a nice six months in jail.

Why is it that so many people always claim to be part injun? I think it has more to do with the guilt tripping of being White.
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Old October 6th, 2007 #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burnjewburn View Post
Why is it that so many people always claim to be part injun? I think it has more to do with the guilt tripping of being White.
This is one of my main problems with people from Kentucky in general. Being from roughly the same area as me, I'm sure you hear this a lot locally. Almost everyone you run into has a "FULL BLOODED CHEROKEE" grandmother or other such nonsense.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #10
Robert Bandanza
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Thumbs up The undefeated Rocky Marciano


Hey, Detroit! Why not Rocky Marciano Arena?
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #11
McKinley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demonica View Post
This is one of my main problems with people from Kentucky in general. Being from roughly the same area as me, I'm sure you hear this a lot locally. Almost everyone you run into has a "FULL BLOODED CHEROKEE" grandmother or other such nonsense.
You are right. They act like it is cool to be part of a race that looks like it slide out of a skido can.
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"What do you expect? All we got on this team are a bunch a Jews, spics, niggers, pansies -- and a booger-eatin' moron!"

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Old October 6th, 2007 #12
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Originally Posted by ROBERTVS ABVNDANTIVS View Post

Hey, Detroit! Why not Rocky Marciano Arena?
'Da Rock used to call his right hand punch, "Suzi Q". But Jersey Joe Walcott, pictured here, is probably calling it.....Ouch!

 
Old October 6th, 2007 #13
Michael S. Burks
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Originally Posted by burnjewburn View Post
Why is it that so many people always claim to be part injun? I think it has more to do with the guilt tripping of being White.


In Brett's case, I actually believe him. His grandmother was a full blooded injun. The tribe it was is currently slipping my mind.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #14
Michael S. Burks
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve B View Post
'Da Rock used to call his right hand punch, "Suzi Q". But Jersey Joe Walcott, pictured here, is probably calling it.....Ouch!



49 wins and o losses - 43 coming by way of knockout. Not too bad for a a man who didn't turn pro until his late 20's.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #15
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Default Babe Ruth



One the greatest baseball players to live. Unlike the niggers today whom use all kinds of enhancers.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #16
Michael S. Burks
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Originally Posted by Phil_88 View Post


One the greatest baseball players to live. Unlike the niggers today whom use all kinds of enhancers.
What's amazing about the Babe was how great of pitcher he was early on. Many people seem to forget that. He took the Boston Redsox to two Championship games as a picther, winning one.

And his workout was far different then most to put up such amazing numbers. Instead of jogging and working out before games, the Babe would drink 5 beers and eat 4 hot dogs. If Barry Bonds did that, he would have been a .220 hitter.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #17
Michael S. Burks
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Originally Posted by Phil_88 View Post


One the greatest baseball players to live. Unlike the niggers today whom use all kinds of enhancers.
What's amazing about the Babe was how great of pitcher he was early on. Many people seem to forget that. He took the Boston Redsox to two Championship games as a picther, winning one.

And his workout was far different then most to put up such amazing numbers. Instead of jogging and working out before games, the Babe would drink 5 beers and eat 4 hot dogs. If Barry Bonds did that, he would have been a .220 hitter.
 
Old October 6th, 2007 #18
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Default from:BEDLAM NATION

It is said of Cobb that he refused to socialize with Babe Ruth,saying the Babe was possesed of nigger habits,if not in fact nigger blood!
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Ty Cobb: Southern Nationalist Hero

Although he was widely regarded as the greatest all-around baseball player of his day, no name evokes such a reflexive disdain from today’s politically correct elite as does the name Cobb. The general idea is that while “The Georgia Peach” may have been great in his day, his achievements were eventually overshadowed by more modern – and enlightened – personalities. Even by those who admire Cobb’s ferocious style and obvious skills, the Georgian is regarded as an atavistic holdover, a relic from the South’s shameful past. In truth, adjusted for the era he played in, Cobb’s diamond achievements still shine, in some ways more brightly than ever. But more important, he can be seen as an example of a type as out of fashion now as he is sorely needed: a hero in defense of his honor and that of his family, his country and his race.

Cobb had an incredible drive to prevail, to outdo the other man, to win at any cost. He was absolutely fearless and inspired something close to terror in his opponents. His approach to baseball – and to life – was marked by a highly developed sense of personal honor. To give in, to admit defeat, to back down from a fight was simply not in the Cobb makeup. He was indomitable. “Baseball is something like a war,” he said, and he waged it wits as well as fists and spikes. Using his sharp mind to outwit his opponents, he employed a psychological approach. His goal was not just excellence but the utter demoralization of the enemy. Cobb waged total war, and his complex personality bore the scars of his defeats and the marks of his victories. Yet he could be gracious, especially to men who shared his code.


“To Win His Father’s Respect”

Born in Banks County, northeastern Georgia, in an area just south of Baldwin that was known as The Narrows, Cobb was descended from early English settlers of Virginia, North Carolina and Georgia. His father, William Herschel Cobb, claimed relation to Howell Cobb, who served as speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, governor of Georgia and, after secession, secretary of the treasury of the Confederate government and major general in the Confederate army. Another Cobb, Thomas Reade Rootes Cobb, was a brigadier general who was killed at Fredericksburg. Whether these illustrious men were actually lineal ancestors of Ty is unclear; that their memory and a sense of duty to uphold the family name were driving elements for Cobb is certain. On his mother’s side, Cobb’s grandfather was Caleb Chitwood, who fought for the Confederacy and after mustering out acquired the farmland on which Ty was born. Cobb’s father was a North Carolina State Agricultural College graduate who became an itinerant rural schoolmaster. It’s likely that he met Cobb’s mother while teaching at The Narrows. The two were married in 1883; Tyrus wasn’t born until three years later, because Amanda Chitwood Cobb was only 12 at the time of the wedding.

Young Cobb was a spirited youth who showed a lot of bravery and pluck but was also somewhat bookish. By the time he was entering his early teens, his father had made quite a name for himself locally. The elder Cobb had been mayor of Royston, edited the local newspaper, was elected to the state senate and was Franklyn County’s first school commissioner. Young Ty all but worshipped his father, who wanted him to get an education and choose a career in medicine, the law or the military. But something else beckoned. For Ty had discovered that his greatest passion lay in the game of baseball, in the thrill of running, catching the ball, and the electric tingle that making contact with it produced through the bat in his hands. At this time, the game was changing. Something exciting a happening in America. Up north lay glittering cities in which stately grandstands surrounded lush ballfields. Crowds of five, six, eight, and even ten thousand jammed the stands and bleachers in New York, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Washington, Detroit and St. Louis. In 1901, the modern era of baseball had begun with the advent of the American League as co-equal with the National. Just as Cobb was beginning his apprenticeship in town ball with Royston, the first World Series was held between Boston and Pittsburgh. Overflow crowds lined the fields along the foul lines and outfield walls.

There was glory and honor and money to be made playing the great game, but Ty’s father was opposed. He did not want his son to become a ruffian, a hooligan who drank and chased impure women. To compromise, Ty worked hard throughout the spring and summer of 1903 in the family cotton field, not only mastering the plowing, seeding and tending to produce the crop but becoming skilled at the post-harvest aspects of ginning, baling and grading the cotton to market. This brought the respect of the elder Cobb but did not diminish Ty’s baseball ardor. By the next year young Cobb was knocking around the region with teams in the low minors. Unhappy but recognizing his son’s determination, the elder Cobb reluctantly let him go. “Don’t come home a failure,” he said. Ty benefited from the tutelage of an older player, George Leidy, who drilled him incessantly in fundamentals at the plate and in the field, teaching the youngster the arts of the bunt, the steal, the hit and run. Before long Cobb was the most exciting player in the Southern Atlantic League and had attracted the attention of northern Major League scouts.

But just as he was poised for a major breakthrough, Ty received the most devastating news of his life: His father had been shot dead – by his mother. Perhaps suspecting infidelity, Professor Cobb announced he was leaving town for a few days, left the house on the evening of Aug. 8, 1905, and apparently went back to his home and around midnight climbed onto his porch roof and began opening the bedroom window. Amanda Cobb grabbed a loaded shotgun and fired two shots, one hitting the professor in the stomach, the second one – suspiciously delayed by an interval – taking off the top of her husband’s head. They found a revolver in his pocket. Deep in anguish, numbed by the tragedy, Ty stoically went through the motions of trying to assume manly responsibility for his mother, brother and sister. His closest friend at the time later remarked, “I know for a fact that he never got over it. It was like he took an oath in W.H.’s name. A lot of what he’d done up until then in playing ball was to win his father’s respect …. After the shooting, I figure that much of what he did on the diamond was for W.H. Seemed he was out to pay tribute to him in death” (Cobb: A Biography, Al Stump, p. 95). After helping the family adjust its affairs, Ty, having been scouted by the American League Detroit Tigers, got the call to report for major league duty. He was in Detroit less than a month after his father had been shot. So much that was wonderful and terrible had happened so quickly. More than ever, Cobb was determined to make good.


Hardened by Ill-Treatment

The game Cobb joined in 1905 was a rough and tumble world of hard-bitten men for whom baseball was quite often the only way out of mines and factories or from behind mules. As potential rivals who could send a man back to obscurity and hard labor, rookies were unwelcome. Established regulars hung together and fought for their jobs. Cobb joined the Tigers and was met immediately with a hazing regime that lasted for the next year and a half. A cadre of older men, all Tiger regulars hailing from the North or Midwest, conspired against him. He found his bats shattered or sawn in half, his glove shredded, his shoes filled with horse turds. Collecting his coat and hat after meals, he found rotten fruit in the pockets, the hat speared through the rack. They nailed his shoes to the clubhouse floor. They laid down at the plate when the Georgian was on base; they gave up on outfield chances that he would have to strain for and muff: anything to make the rookie look bad. Alone, friendless in the alien world of the vast urban North, Cobb sought escape in museums, galleries, concerts and the opera or spent his evenings reading, all of which estranged him further from the other men. Cobb began to carry a revolver. Finally, his nerves shot, he suffered a breakdown. Things came to a head when a ball rolled for a two-run homer between Cobb and one of the main instigators, outfielder Matty McIntyre. That evening in the hotel lobby pitcher Ed Siever insulted Cobb: “You’re still a Dixie prick whose folks live off nigger slaves.” Cobb, who had plowed his own cotton field and worked side by side in the dirt with a hired Negro hand, boiled over. By the time they broke up the fight Cobb was kicking the defeated Siever across the lobby floor.


Fearsome Reputation

As the young ballplayer grew in skill, he gained in self-mastery and turned to the offensive. From 1907 till his retirement from the game in 1928, Cobb launched a relentless all-out assault against Yankee pitchers, players and fans. It was as if he was conducting a one-man punitive raid on the North in honor of what his ancestors fought for and lost. He developed a hard-nosed style of baserunning in which he asserted his right to the bag. If a baseman or catcher tried to block his way, Cobb came in with spikes high. “Give me room or get hurt,” was his motto, and he lived by it. Cobb’s own legs were scarred by dozens of gouges and gashes. His intimidating reputation was cemented by numerous stories in which he played through serious illness and injury. During the spring training schedule in 1906, at the height of the Tigers’ hazing and fearing he would be cut if he fell out of the lineup, Cobb had his tonsils removed without anesthetic by a house doctor in a hotel in Toledo, Ohio. The cutting took place in three sessions, two at night and a third the next morning, after which Cobb traveled by train to Columbus for an exhibition game in which he got a hit in seven innings of play. Another time Cobb, spiked in the knee during a collision with infielder Joe Sewell, ligaments and bone showing through the cut, was stitched without anesthetic. “I can’t deaden the pain,” the doctor said. “I’ll take it cold,” Cobb said. “Just give me a cigar.” In another incredible incident, Cobb was driving to the train station in Detroit with his wife in 1912. Three men waved for help and when Cobb pulled over, they reached into the car, and demanding money, attacked him. Cobb got out, and the men traded punches. In the scuffle, Cobb was stabbed in the back but managed to chase off the assailants. In hot pursuit, Cobb pulled his gun and when it misfired socked one man with it and caught a second in an alley. Using the heavy Belgian Nagant revolver as a bludgeon, Cobb beat the man extensively about the head and face, claiming later he was sure he’d killed him. Finally he caught the train en route to an exhibition game in Syracuse, N.Y., where the next day, playing with a makeshift bandage on the six-inch wound, he got three hits.


“Racist” or Man of Honor?

Central to his reputation as a “racist” was Cobb’s history of violent run-ins with blacks. In 1908, he knocked down a black laborer worker who accidentally flicked a bit of asphalt on Cobb’s trousers while coating a street. The black newspaper Chicago Defender reported that Cobb had kicked a chambermaid down a flight of stairs after she objected to being called “nigger.” Early in 1907, Cobb slapped a black groundskeeper who while drunk, Cobb claimed, clapped him on the shoulder in a gesture of inappropriate familiarity. Already resentful from suspicions that the groundskeeper had trashed one of his gloves, the Peach attacked. He assaulted the groundkeeper and chased him back to a shack near the clubhouse, where his wife came to his aid. Teammates came running over to find Cobb choking her. Although a Southerner himself, the Tigers’ catcher, Charlie Schmidt, objected to the rough treatment of the woman and challenged the Georgian, and the two scuffled. A formal match was set up in which the 240 pound catcher and former boxer Schmidt gave Cobb perhaps the only defeat he ever suffered in a fight. Flattened, his nose broken, Cobb got up again and again, only to be pummeled further by Schmidt. In 1909, Cobb slapped a black elevator operator at Hotel Euclid in Cleveland, Ohio. In the lobby, the house detective, also black, attacked Cobb with a nightstick, As they fought, the detective, George Stansfield, pulled his gun. Cobb produced a knife, cutting Stansfield.

At the bottom of most of these dustups was Cobb’s defense of the ethos of white Southern manhood in the face of violations of the code. “(H)e believed blacks to be fundamentally different from and inferior to whites, and thus necessarily suited to a subservient role in a society that must be dominated by whites. Although most non-Southern whites probably felt basically the same way, that belief was most prevalent among white people in the southern states ….” That is to say, it was up to Southerners like Cobb to actually uphold the code when it was challenged. But by no means was Cobb hateful when unprovoked. “He had pleasant recollections of a black maid who had looked after the Cobb children at their home in Royston, and he was capable of acts of kindness toward particular black persons.” Indeed, some blacks got on quite well with Cobb. In 1948, the Detroit News published an account in which a black man named Alexander George Washington Rivers described his relationship to Cobb in glowing terms. He met the famous ballplayer in New Orleans during an exhibition and was invited north to serve as Cobb’s bat man, chauffeur and general handyman. Rivers even named a son Ty Cobb Rivers in honor of the Peach, hardly the act of a man stinging under the lash of all-out racial hatred. “But [Cobb] had no patience whatever with blacks who were insolent, fractious, unsubmissive – in a word, ‘uppity’ ” (Charles C. Alexander, Ty Cobb, p. 68).

And neither would he put up with insults from white men that took on a racial character. In 1912 at New York’s tiny Hilltop Park, Cobb withstood the attentions of a particularly vicious heckler. Dodging his taunts and insults by avoiding crossing the field near the man’s seat, Cobb asked park officials to have him removed but to no avail. As the Peach was on his way back to the dugout, the fan, Claude Lueker, yelled that Cobb was a “half-nigger.” Egged on by teammate Sam Crawford, Cobb brawled his way up to Lueker’s row and was kicking and stomping him while Crawford and other Tigers armed themselves with bats and challenged other New York fans. In his defense, Cobb said, “When a spectator calls me a ‘half-nigger’ I think it is about time to fight.” League president Ban Johnson suspended Cobb. The rest of the Tigers, some of whom were participants in the hazing of Cobb some six years earlier, went on strike, refusing to play until Cobb was reinstated. The men knew that if fans were allowed to insult players with impunity, none of them would be safe from insult. A line had to be drawn somewhere. The case was finally settled when Ty accepted a 10-day suspension.

Cobb’s reaction drew some favorable notice. “Most working sportswriters tended to side with Cobb, agreeing that spectators’ abuse of players had got out of hand and that the slur hurled at him would have provoked almost any white man, especially a sensitive southerner.” In addition, “Georgia’s entire congressional delegation – two senators and ten representatives – wired Cobb that ‘As Georgians we commend your action in resisting an uncalled for insult.’ Mayor Courtland S. Winn of Atlanta praised him for upholding ‘the principles that have always been taught to Southern manhood,’ and the city’s police commissioner thought that if Cobb hadn’t ‘licked that man as he should, he would have lost the respect of every decent man in the country” (Alexander, p. 107).


Brilliant Achievements

When Cobb retired in 1928, the books showed that he had created 123 records. Some still stand, and many that have been eclipsed stood for 50 years or more. The Peach’s reputation for truculence has all but overshadowed his diamond achievements. He is usually thought of in modern baseball terms as a pesky singles hitter type. In truth, Cobb was among the most run-productive players the game has ever seen. He was an RBI and run-scoring machine. Facing the spitball and other adulterated deliveries daily, playing in a pitcher’s era when teams fought to scratch out runs one at a time, when whole teams hit 10 or 20 home runs a year, Cobb’s most runs record stood for 70 years. Only Henry Aaron, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Stan Musial drove in more runs than Cobb. He led the league in slugging seven times, and he is tied for 7th all-time in on base percentage. Cobb rates favorably in run production, which can be measured by adding a player’s runs and RBIs and dividing them by his total plate appearances to get a figure which represents what percentage of a run a man was good for every time he stepped to the plate. For Cobb, the figure is .329. Only men like Ruth, Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Ted Williams, Joe DiMaggio and contemporary stars Albert Pujols and Barry Bonds – all of whom played or play in higher scoring eras – rank higher. Cobb’s .329 mark eclipses that of Aaron (.324), Mickey Mantle (.323), Willie Mays (.321), Reggie Jackson (.289), and Ernie Banks (.288), all of whom were recognized sluggers. Compare Cobb’s mark with players who have broken some of his records and to whom he is often compared: Pete Rose (.223) and Rickey Henderson (.262). Many of Cobb’s 2,245 runs he manufactured himself with his aggressive base running; indeed, 35 of them came on steals of home.

In another index Cobb shines as well. Taking into account tallies both scored and batted in, in his top years Cobb accounted for between 17 and 19 percent of his team’s runs. In 1907, he amassed 22 percent of the team’s RBIs. Babe Ruth, usually thought of as the man who had the most impact on the game ever, performed about as well. The Bambino typically accounted for a comparable figure. In his record setting home run year of 1927, Ruth picked up only about 18 percent of the Yankees' RBIs. This means that Cobb’s impact on the game was measurably similar to that of the Herculean Ruth. It is facts like these, coupled with his indomitable will and fire, that make the Georgian even to this day unforgettable. But records alone can’t capture the thrills he brought to fans, teammates and opponents. Contemporary American Leaguer George Sisler said, “The greatness of Ty Cobb was something that had to be seen, and to see him was to remember him forever” (Alexander, p. 3).


Generous to Friends and Ex-Foes Alike

In another respect Cobb was a man of honor. As shrewd in business and investment as he had been in sizing up the skills of his opponents, Cobb by the time of his retirement had become quite wealthy. The Depression didn’t even put a dent in his stock holdings; most of them actually grew. Coca-Cola and General Motors stock, bought for a song in the years around World War I, lay the basis of Cobb’s fortune, estimated at $11 million at his death in 1961. A notorious tightwad in business dealings, the Peach could nevertheless be generous in more personal affairs. For years he sent checks – often anonymously through third parties – to ex-teammates and former opponents alike, many of whom he fought with during their playing days. The man who took him under his wing in the minor leagues, George Leidy, was rewarded in this way. He paid the medical bills of one ex-teammate, Lu Blue, and helped his widow financially. Other money went into more public projects. He helped found a hospital near his boyhood home in Royston. In 1953, he set up a non-athletic scholarship fund, stipulating that the money be used to send to college kids who were not well-off, “the boys and girls out of the fields and mountains” (Alexander, p. 225). Also Cobb lobbied successfully to get ex-teammate Sam Crawford, a man who disliked him intensely, into the Hall of Fame.

Certainly Cobb was haunted throughout his life by the tragic death of his father, and may have sustained serious psychological damage by that trauma and by the ruthless hazing he endured at the hands of hardened veterans as a teenager in Detroit. Others, who felt the heat of his rage, speculated that he was a seriously disturbed man. But even if true, he used his anguish to fuel the drive that brought him his many records, the trophies of the war he fought to vindicate himself before his father’s memory. Fearlessly he fought to uphold a standard of personal honor that, while reviled in today’s politically correct environment, is vital if a people is to survive. Whites will either rally around figures like Cobb, or they will see their achievements denigrated, their culture debased and their progeny extinguished.
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Old October 7th, 2007 #19
John in Woodbridge
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Originally Posted by burnjewburn View Post
Why is it that so many people always claim to be part injun? I think it has more to do with the guilt tripping of being White.
True. Many whites claim this although you look at them and you can't tell that they had any admixture. Almost all blacks claim to be part indian.
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Old October 7th, 2007 #20
Michael S. Burks
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Default Steve Nash

Steve Nash is the best point guard currently in the NBA. He has won the past two out of three NBA MVP awards (the other also being a white player)






Most Valuable Player 2005
In 2005, Nash edged Shaquille O'Neal of the Miami Heat to win the NBA MVP award.[18] Nash became the first Canadian and the second foreign-born player (after Hakeem Olajuwon) to earn the honour.[1] He is the first MVP who did not lead his team in scoring since Dave Cowens in 1972-73. Nash is just the third point guard ever to be named MVP — along with Magic Johnson and Bob Cousy — and only the sixth guard (Michael Jordan, Oscar Robertson, and Allen Iverson being the others).[1] Nash was the first white player to win the award since Larry Bird in 1986 and remains the lowest-drafted NBA player ever to win MVP honors.


[edit] 2005-06 season
During the Suns' off-season, Stoudemire suffered a knee injury, Joe Johnson was traded to the Atlanta Hawks for Boris Diaw, and Quentin Richardson was traded to the New York Knicks for Kurt Thomas and two draft picks. Due to these factors, the Suns were not expected to repeat their successful 2005 season. However, because of Nash's leadership and the solid play of his teammates Marion and Diaw (who earned the 2006 NBA Most Improved Player Award), the Suns remained one of the elite teams in the league. They again were the highest scoring team in the league with seven players averaging double figures in points per game. Nash was voted as a first-time starter for the 2006 Western All-Star team. On May 17, Nash was named to the All-NBA First Team.

Nash was widely viewed as an MVP candidate as the regular season came to a close. He set career highs in points (18.8), rebounds (4.2), field goal percentage (.512) and free throw percentage (a league-leading .921).[1] While he shot the ball more than the previous year, he still averaged a league-leading 10.5 assists per game.[1]

He also became the fourth player in NBA history to shoot better than 50% from the field, 40% from three-point range (43.9), and 90% from the line, joining Larry Bird, Reggie Miller and Mark Price.[1] (Reggie Miller in 1993-94, Mark Price in 1988-89 and Larry Bird in 1986-87 and 1987-88) He led the NBA in assists (10.5) for the second year in a row and is the first NBA player since Jason Kidd (1998-99, 1999-00) to average double figures in assists in consecutive seasons. Along with Shawn Marion, Nash led the Suns to another Pacific Division title and 54 wins. He would later be awarded the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canadian athlete of the year.[19]


[edit] Most Valuable Player 2006
The MVP award was awarded by the NBA on May 7, 2006 to Steve Nash for the second year in a row.[20] The official announcement came only a day after the Phoenix Suns (playing against the Lakers) became the eighth team in NBA history to come back from a 3-1 deficit to win a best-of-seven playoff series.

Nash is only the second point guard, along with Magic Johnson, to win the MVP award multiple times and also the third guard in NBA history to earn back-to-back MVPs joining Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan.[1] Only eight other NBA players have won back-to-back MVP awards: Magic Johnson, Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Moses Malone, Larry Bird, Michael Jordan and Tim Duncan.[1] Former player and Hall Of Famer Bill Russell showed his admiration of Nash after criticism rained down on the two consecutive MVPs given to him and a potential third that would have vaulted him into legendary status. Russell stated: "I think, on the world stage, he's one of our great athletes in all sports," Russell said. "I'm a big fan. The two MVPs he got, he deserved. Part of the reason that he's so good and so effective is that the guys like playing with him. He creates an atmosphere where they win games."[21] However, on a dissenting note, analyst Bill Simmons of ESPN.com, stated "Steve Nash's back-to-back trophies transformed the award into what it is now: a popularity contest."[22]


[edit] 2006-07 season
Nash had another stellar season, averaging 18.6 points and a career-high 11.6 assists per game while becoming the first person since Magic Johnson (1990-91) to average 18 points and 11 assists per game during the regular season.[23] Nash received the most votes for first team All-NBA and was joined by teammate Amare Stoudemire. Two-time defending NBA MVP Nash and Stoudemire are the first teammates to make the first team since Kobe Bryant and Shaquille O'Neal in 2003-04.[23] Nash received 129 first-place votes and 645 total points from the panel of 129 media members.[23] He narrowly missed being MVP a third consecutive time, coming in second with 44 first place votes to 83 for Dirk Nowitzki.[24]
 
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