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Old March 10th, 2008 #1
Alex Linder
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[Would you take out tens of thousands in loans to pay your worst enemy to brainwash your children? If you're like most middle-class Americans, the answer is "Yes." Where's the scam in 'a college education,' perhaps the holiest words in America this side of Jaysus and democracy? For starters, assimilate this: only ten to fifteen percent of the population is intellectually capable of handling college-level material. Yet fifty percent of traditionally college-aged students attend college. Meaning that the vast bulk of institutions out there are so many high schools and even junior highs masquerading as universities. Then there's the question of who is teaching whom what. The answer is that, essentially, marxist jews are teaching the children of naive Whites. Whites who don't know any better than to think what they're paying for is the real thing. Finally there's the question of funding. Few Whites or their parents have the money to pay the tens of thousands it often costs for a single year of college. So they take out loans. They go into debt, believing the Big Lie that college degree equates to millions in extra income over the course of a lifetime, a lie that never goes out of circulation in the controlled media. The fact is that a kid who went to work at 16 and worked steadily until he was 26, saving money the whole time, would come out with hundreds of thousands in the bank, as opposed to his peer with a semi-useless college and grad degree, who starts "real" life tens of thousands in debt. Little hint, lemmings: if you're going tens of thousands of dollars into debt for something, you'd better ask real, real hard questions about what you get on the back end. And what you'll find is that very few colleges, degrees, or programs are worth that kind of money. I mean, you can work at Starbucks (don't, it's a jew-owned chain) without a degree in communications from Erie State.]



Higher-Ed Revolution
Posted by Lew Rockwell at March 10, 2008 08:28 AM

The vast, and vastly expensive, college and university sector is in trouble, though the WaPo doesn't put it like that. Starting with the GI Bill, the federal government has heavily subsidized and controlled higher education, leading to far too many students and professors, and a radical decline in the average intellectual quality of both. Then there is the effect of unrelenting official PC. Feminism, for example, has led to a boy shortage. They comprise about 42% of the average campus, though that is almost never discussed. Outside of certain professional areas and the hard sciences, why should middle-class parents pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to send a boy to four years of dumbed down official indoctrination that tells him he's the scum of the earth? It doesn't even pay off in lifetime earnings, despite the propaganda.

Then there is another problem. The whole apparatus is based today on student loans, but with the credit crunch, they could dry up. No more repackaging and selling them as securities! Of course, the Fed can just print the money, but there is a cost to that, and the banks and Wall Street and the merchants of death are in line first. A huge state university of, say, 25,000 students could shrink by half or two-thirds in a depression.

Despite federal distortions, there is a demand for real education, but it will increasingly take place outside the federalized, elephantized official system: in institutions like the Mises Institute.

Last edited by Alex Linder; April 21st, 2009 at 01:03 AM.
 
Old March 13th, 2008 #2
Uncle John
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IMO, this is one of the best posts ever made on this forum. I agree with every single word of it. "Educationalism" in the United States took off in a big way around 1943, when the Congress was looking ahead to the end of the war and was eager to develop programs with which to buy the votes of returning G.I.s.

About twenty years ago I taught a senior-level course in the Price College of Business at the University of Oklahoma. Even then, my students' writing ability was amazingly bad. Most of them couldn't find the topic sentence in a paragraph.
 
Old March 13th, 2008 #3
Mike in Denver
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This is a really tough question, and things have changed over the years.

I started college at Texas A & M in the fall of 1963. My first semester cost about $400, and that included room and meals. You read it right -- $400 for tuition, books, room, and meals.

From about that time until, say 2000, anyone with a degree in Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics was guaranteed a life of good employment. Later, you could add Computer Science to the list. I think it was about 1970 or so that Universities began offering degrees in CS.

That's all changed. I have no idea what a semester costs at A & M or elsewhere, but I have a feeling it is a little more that $400. And, even a good technical degree is guarantee of nothing, these days. Then, there is the strange phenomenon of kids paying to get degrees in Communications, Woman's studies, and God knows what. Tens of thousands of dollars for degrees in gibberish.

If I had a kid about college age, I wouldn't know what to do. I'd want my child to earn a degree in Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics, but the cost is immense. And, as I wrote above, these degrees don't guarantee high-paid employment, as they used to.

Enkidu
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Old March 15th, 2008 #4
Martin Horvath...
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enkidu View Post
This is a really tough question, and things have changed over the years.

I started college at Texas A & M in the fall of 1963. My first semester cost about $400, and that included room and meals. You read it right -- $400 for tuition, books, room, and meals.

From about that time until, say 2000, anyone with a degree in Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics was guaranteed a life of good employment. Later, you could add Computer Science to the list. I think it was about 1970 or so that Universities began offering degrees in CS.

That's all changed. I have no idea what a semester costs at A & M or elsewhere, but I have a feeling it is a little more that $400. And, even a good technical degree is guarantee of nothing, these days. Then, there is the strange phenomenon of kids paying to get degrees in Communications, Woman's studies, and God knows what. Tens of thousands of dollars for degrees in gibberish.

If I had a kid about college age, I wouldn't know what to do. I'd want my child to earn a degree in Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics, but the cost is immense. And, as I wrote above, these degrees don't guarantee high-paid employment, as they used to.

Enkidu
A country with very little manufacturing does not have much need of engineers. There is a glut of electrical engineers. Computer Science departments are drying up around the country due to lack of enrollment. Petroleum engineers are in a great demand as are graduates in the geological sciences. If the country continues to slip into a severe recession/depression as I think it will, these bogus colleges and universities will be in big trouble due to lack of enrollment. College has become nothing more than another debt slavery scam. Whites who send their daughters off to college to study sociology are really going into debt to send their daughter to a whore training academy.
 
Old August 3rd, 2008 #5
T. Kadijevic
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And of course lets not forget that its WHO you know that will get you into a job. That piece of paper that you earn at school will qualify you for advancement and promotions within your chosen place of work...maybe!
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Old August 3rd, 2008 #6
John in Woodbridge
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I don't have a link, but I've heard that a (way overpriced) college education is becoming increasingly worthless as far as giving folks good earning potential. Learn a trade.
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Old August 3rd, 2008 #7
odin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Kadijevic View Post
And of course lets not forget that its WHO you know that will get you into a job. That piece of paper that you earn at school will qualify you for advancement and promotions within your chosen place of work...maybe!
Depends on the field. In the sciences, the degree is a "key" that allows you to enter the consideration phase. No key; no chance of consideration for employment.
 
Old March 13th, 2013 #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike in Denver View Post
This is a really tough question, and things have changed over the years.

I started college at Texas A & M in the fall of 1963. My first semester cost about $400, and that included room and meals. You read it right -- $400 for tuition, books, room, and meals.

From about that time until, say 2000, anyone with a degree in Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics was guaranteed a life of good employment. Later, you could add Computer Science to the list. I think it was about 1970 or so that Universities began offering degrees in CS.

That's all changed. I have no idea what a semester costs at A & M or elsewhere, but I have a feeling it is a little more that $400. And, even a good technical degree is guarantee of nothing, these days. Then, there is the strange phenomenon of kids paying to get degrees in Communications, Woman's studies, and God knows what. Tens of thousands of dollars for degrees in gibberish.

If I had a kid about college age, I wouldn't know what to do. I'd want my child to earn a degree in Engineering, Physics, or Mathematics, but the cost is immense. And, as I wrote above, these degrees don't guarantee high-paid employment, as they used to.

Enkidu
Just like everything else the Jews have sucked everything out of college. I think you can make more money opening a restaurant and there are many more benefits too. The family can work together. You can't be fired unless you give crappy food and service. You get to socialize and you have freedom to come and go. You get degree and then end up buying a restaurant anyway when you learn you can make more moeny.
 
Old April 27th, 2013 #9
Alex Linder
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diversity commissar at Northwestern. no, i'm not kidding - you pay them for this shit. really.
http://vnnforum.com/showthread.php?t=154370
 
Old May 10th, 2013 #10
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Academic Cesspools and Cultural Marxists (Or Do I Repeat Myself?)
Posted by Thomas DiLorenzo on May 9, 2013 07:44 AM

The insightful article by Walter Williams today pinpoints how cultural Marxists have essentially destroyed academic freedom at most American universities while pursuing an agenda of the infantilization of college students. In the old days the Marxists rarely, if ever, debated their intellectual opponents. Instead, they simply resorted to name calling and personal attacks ("Capitalist Tool!!"). After the worldwide collapse of socialism the academic Marxists gave up on the capitalist-working class exploitation story and reinvented themselves by inventing a new class of alleged exploiters: white heterosexual males. All other groups are, by definition, "oppressed" by what they call "white male privilege." The poorest, least educated white redneck living in an old bus down by the river in Mississippi is said to be, by definition, an "oppressor" of Oprah Winfrey, Tiger Woods, all women, gays, lesbians, the transgendered, and all the other mascot groups of the academic left.

Like the old Marxists, the cultural Marxists do not debate their intellectual opponents; they simply call them vile names. As the Walter Williams article pointed out, a potential donor to Bowdoin College was publicly labeled a "racist" by the college president because he suggested that Bowdoin should teach courses about American history and cool it with the obsession with "diversity" (a.k.a. institutionalized discrimination against white heterosexual males) as the sole purpose of higher education. This is why we observe such spectacles as when Walter Block gave a state-of-the-art public lecture at Loyola University Maryland on the economics of discrimination, a field pioneered by Professor Block's Columbia University dissertation advisor, the Nobel laureate Gary Becker, he was libeled by the university president, Brian Linnane, as a racist and a sexist. (Linnane wasn't even at the lecture; it was enough for him to hear that someone had criticized one of the superstitions of academic feminism, that sex discrimination is the one-and-only-cause of male/female wage differences). There are dozens -- probably hundreds -- of other similar examples in academe, which is why it has indeed become an academic cesspool, as Walter Williams describes.
 
Old March 11th, 2013 #11
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One kid could graduate from being home schooled at 16 and open a pizza shop and make $100,000 a year and buy a another pizza shop every couple years and by thirty could retire. While college guy gets out at 22 with $100,000 in debt. Maybe by 30 he'll pay off the debt and start to make some decent money. Meanwhile pizza guy is retired fishing in tournaments and making as much money in tournaments as college boy is making. Yes, college is a scam.
For one thing you should homeschool your kids and graduate them when you want. People don't want to move their kids up in school even though they could do it easily, because of moving ahead of their peers. Homeschooling makes it easier.
 
Old March 13th, 2013 #12
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You have to understand if they didn't trick us with making us believe we need to waste four more years and a hundred grand for college, then so many people would do things like open restaurants and businesses and then there would be so many more people with money.
I believe they also do it because you will find a job 500 miles away and then you got to move away from home. If you work on the family farm, restaurant or other business the family is together.
So they create many more problems when kids go to college. It gets your kids away from home, because your kid wants to go to college 1,000 miles away and this means this is where they will get into drugs and drinking and all kinds of stupid stuff.
Some people have the idea you got to go to college to make money. Excuse me, but do you need a college degree to open a restaurant, bar, welding shop, carpentry business, cabinet making or pottery? I think these kids go to college for many reasons. One is they don't have to enter the real world and can play for four years and their parents get to write them off for four more years.
College is a total waste and it wouldn't be so bad if it cost $5,000 and you could get a good job inside of a year, but four years is a long time.
If you think that everyone eats and there can never be enough places serving good food and then you can make good money.
So many college jobs are in the city. If you like the country life you won't like the city. Cops, drugs, gangs, and the pollution. Millions of kids have asthma because of the pollution in the cities. In some Chinese cities being in them is like smoking two packs of cigarettes a day and think of raising a child in that pollution.
 
Old December 15th, 2014 #13
The Russian
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Every time I turn around one of my friends, relatives, etc are asking me "When do you start college?". It's annoying as hell considering I've told them a million times already. I'll start within a year, and to be honest I am not looking forward to it. But, I want a good job and I want the Ph.D so I've got to. I don't think college is a must for everyone, though.
 
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