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Old August 1st, 2018 #1
ColdFire
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Default Is it true that the "best" American English is spoken in California ?

. . by "best" I mean "most understandable" ?

I'm not very keen on American dialects/accents ( which is no surprise since I've never been there myself ) yet a friend of mine toured the USA last year . .

He toured through 15 different states all across the country . .
He said that he found the people in California the most easy to understand while in states like Mississippi he had a hard time . . .



Was that maybe his own impression or would Americans subscribe to that?


He was fortunate to not encounter many blacks though . . .

lol , apart from their destructive nature they have a bad babbling . . .





So . . is the best AE spoken in Cali ?

 
Old August 1st, 2018 #2
Ray Allan
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Unfortunately, there is more Spanish, or the bastardized Mexican version of it should I say, being spoken in California today since Whites are now a minority in that state. As well as a sizable amount of Chinese, Korean, and about a hundred other languages. English spoken by natives of western US states generally have a flatter, more non-inflected tone than in other parts of the country as opposed to for example, Southern, Texan, New England, Boston and New York accents. Similar to what you would encounter in different regions and cities of the British Isles. Right there in Germany, you have North German, Bavarian, and other dialects and accents, right? I assume it's that way in California because Americans from all the rest of the country migrated to California in the past, so speech and accents eventually melded into a more monotonous tone over the years. It's the way I speak due to being born in the West, even though my father's side of the family came from Pennsylvania and my mother's were from Georgia, Texas and Oklahoma.
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Old August 2nd, 2018 #3
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Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
Unfortunately, there is more Spanish, or the bastardized Mexican version of it should I say . . .
Yes, I heard that there is a difference between Spanish in its 'purest' form ( Castilian ; Castilian is the 'purest' Spanish . .) and Spanish 'slang' spoken around the world . . . .


Quote:
. . being spoken in California today since Whites are now a minority in that state.
Yep , I'm aware of that too

I suppose instead of good American whiskey one day only Tequila will be poured in Cali . . .






Quote:
As well as a sizable amount of Chinese, Korean, and about a hundred other languages.
'Multiculti' at its finest . . .


https://vnnforum.com/showthread.php?t=550702



Quote:
English spoken by natives of western US states generally have a flatter, more non-inflected tone than in other parts of the country as opposed to for example, Southern, Texan, New England, Boston and New York accents. Similar to what you would encounter in different regions and cities of the British Isles. Right there in Germany, you have North German, Bavarian, and other dialects and accents, right?
EVERY region worldwide has dialects . . .

As for Germany , you better believe we have . .

lol , for a long time there even WASN'T any 'standard German' language ( during the Middle Ages ) . . .

The first person who standardized German was the Protestant reformer Martin Luther . .


He used the tongue spoken in his region ( Upper-Saxony , Thuringia ) for his Bible translation around 1500, which would become the official language in place in all of Germany . . .

People who were raised in Germany can hear the difference whether someone is from Swabia , from the Rhine , from Westphalia , Northern Germany , Berlin , Saxony , Hesse and so on . . .


It's all explainable through the fact that in the beginning Germany was a merger of different Germanic tribes together . .

The Frisians had their own language , as had the Swabians and so on . .


One peculiar thing to mention from that is that today the best German is spoken in Northern Germany ( the region I hail from ) . .

Especially the Hannover region . .


I even once lived there . .

Originally the Northern Germans communicated in "Plattdeutsch" ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German ) but were among the first to adapt Luther's form of German ( in the beginning only the 'upper-class' there , then in time the 'Plattdeutsch'-speakers became a minority . . .) . . .


This is what "Plattdeutsch" sounds like ( by the way , the artist even hails from my home town . . . )


( hope the vid is available in your coutry )

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronny_...ers%C3%A4nger)
Quote:
I assume it's that way in California because Americans from all the rest of the country migrated to California in the past, so speech and accents eventually melded into a more monotonous tone over the years.
May be . . I also once heard that California is the American state with the biggest German influence . . Can you confirm that ?

Quote:
It's the way I speak due to being born in the West, even though my father's side of the family came from Pennsylvania and my mother's were from Georgia, Texas and Oklahoma.
Then you have roots "all across the country"

There is also the cliche about Americans being the people worldwide who move the most in their life (from one location to the other that is . . .) . . Can you confirm ?






As for myself , I speak relatively , read that : relatively accent-free 'High-German' ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_German ) due to being born in Lower-Saxony and having lived in Hannover even though I sometimes fall into 'Northern-Germanisms' . . .

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missingsch
 
Old August 2nd, 2018 #4
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The best American English, as far as being grammatically correct is concerned, is spoken in New England. If you wanted to pin it down further, Yale English spoken in New Haven, Connecticut, is the absolute best.

As far as being easy to understand for a foreigner is concerned, California English may be the best because California has so many foreigners, so the language is flattened and dumbed down a bit. Boston English may be harder to understand because of the accent ("I pahked my cah in Hahvid Yahd"), but grammatically it is better.
 
Old August 2nd, 2018 #5
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Quote:
I also once heard that California is the American state with the biggest German influence..can you confirm that?
No, it isn't. California was originally founded as a Spanish colony and was later Mexican territory before becoming a US state in 1850. States like Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota are far more Germanic due to large numbers of Germans and Scandinavians who originally settled there.

Quote:
There is also the cliché about Americans being the people worldwide who move the most in their life (from one location to the other that is...)..can you confirm?
Basically true.
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Old August 2nd, 2018 #6
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Originally Posted by Nikola Bijeliti View Post
The best American English, as far as being grammatically correct is concerned, is spoken in New England. If you wanted to pin it down further, Yale English spoken in New Haven, Connecticut, is the absolute best.

As far as being easy to understand for a foreigner is concerned, California English may be the best because California has so many foreigners, so the language is flattened and dumbed down a bit. Boston English may be harder to understand because of the accent ("I pahked my cah in Hahvid Yahd"), but grammatically it is better.
Like I said , I've never been to the US myself yet I heard that especially in Boston people are said to still have kind of a British accent . . .

As I have already pointed out in this post https://vnnforum.com/showthread.php?t=550760 , the original pronounciation of the English spoken in the USA must have been British . . . . Over the course of time more and more Irish immigrated which eventually lead to the fact that the English spoken in the US more or less took on an Irish pronounciation . . . I suppose the New England states are still 'close' to this origin . . . .

But my point was which American English would be the best to understand . . . I admit that most Americans I have heard talk were on TV and even I noticed people from California talking quite 'understandable' . . . .

Hollywood ( besides being jewish to the core ) is located in California , where most movies are made . . . .


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
No, it isn't. California was originally founded as a Spanish colony and was later Mexican territory before becoming a US state in 1850.
Oh , I'm aware of California's Spanish roots . . . .


The 'Legend Of Zorro' is set there . . . .

Yet what I meant was after it became part of 'Anglo'-America. . . .

Quote:
States like Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota are far more Germanic due to large numbers of Germans and Scandinavians who originally settled there.
You know your history

While we're at this subject , I heard that the most significant Scandinavian immigrant group to the US were Swedes . . . .



Quote:
Basically true.
Thanks for clarifying . . .

I also moved quite a few times in my life ( born in rural Lower-Saxony ) , raised in Bremen , also lived in Hannover and Bermerhaven , then moved back . . .

Yet I heard that Americans tend to move about 30 times during their life . . . . .

 
Old August 2nd, 2018 #7
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Two more points concerning Californians . . .

From what I've witnessed they tend to have 'light' voices , sound friendly . .

Maybe the California gentility which is often praised really developed due to California being a gathering place for European-Americans, read that European-Americans from all across the country . . . .

Also , all 'famous' US localities are there . .

Hollywood ( yes , it's jewish to the core yet it is famous . . .), the Sunset Boulevard etc . . .

Also according to my observation , most fictional stories set in the US play in California , LA mostly ( apart from New York also being a favoured place for stories set in the US . . )

However , Cali seems to have allowed this status to be misused by the NWO forces as a 'catching-place' for many cultures around the world . . .


 
Old August 2nd, 2018 #8
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Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
Unfortunately, there is more Spanish, or the bastardized Mexican version of it should I say, being spoken in California today since Whites are now a minority in that state.
Yep , I suppose subconsciously the Mexicans are still angry at the Anglo-Americans for incorporating two thirds of their territory many years ago . .



Some people call it the 'Reconquista'
( which is ironic since the original Reconquista was all about Germanics re-conquering the Spanish territory from the Muslims . .). .


In this so-called 'Reconquista' the roles are somewhat reversed. . Brown-skins supposedly re-conquering (((their))) territory . .


. . they try it by both (((legal))) and illegal immigration . .




Probably thinking one day they'll have the majority . .

Pretty much like the Muslims in Europe with their sheer numbers

 
Old August 3rd, 2018 #9
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The accent of most whites here is quite neutral. There are some American accents that sound almost like another language.
[I was born in the Southern United States, my parents moved there from Scotland before I was born. Though much of my childhood was spent in Wiggin, in Lancashire, just below the Scotish border. I've lived in Northern California since '92.]
In Scotland, everyone says I have an American accent and in America, they say I have a Scottish (or often British) accent.
Many of the large cities here (e.g., Frisco, L.A., San Diego) are overrun with illegal immigrants who speak English sparingly, if at all.
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Old August 3rd, 2018 #10
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Originally Posted by joeylowsac View Post
The accent of most whites here is quite neutral. There are some American accents that sound almost like another language.
I'm not American but of course I have been exposed to many Americans talking ( whether on TV , movies , CDs etc . . .) . . .
Two things to mention are that I have noticed Californians mostly talking in quite a 'high' and gentle voice . .
The Texas accent for example sounds quite 'rough' and I think , despite not being American I would be able to figure it out . . .

Some Texans talking . .




Quote:
I was born in the Southern United States, my parents moved there from Scotland before I was born. Though much of my childhood was spent in Wiggin, in Lancashire, just below the Scotish border. I've lived in Northern California since '92.
Funny thing to mention , the American South was influenced by Scotland . . .

Many slave owners in the American South were of Scottish heritage ( factory owners , plantation owners . .) .

It is even claimed that the American Southern dialect was influenced by Scottish . . .

Also, look at the flag of the Confeferacy during the war of seccession . .


This is the Scottish flag . .


Similarity . . two askance stripes . . .

Apparently a lot of American Southerners were / are pround / aware of their Scottish heritage . .


Quote:
In Scotland, everyone says I have an American accent and in America, they say I have a Scottish (or often British) accent.




Quote:
Many of the large cities here (e.g., Frisco, L.A., San Diego) are overrun with illegal immigrants who speak English sparingly, if at all.
I suppose soon our nations even won't speak our native languages any more For example someone going to Stuttgart , Germany to learn Swabian will have learned Turkish or Kisualheli afterwards . .

 
Old August 3rd, 2018 #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdFire View Post
I also once heard that California is the American state with the biggest German influence . . Can you confirm that ?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
No, it isn't. California was originally founded as a Spanish colony and was later Mexican territory before becoming a US state in 1850. States like Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota are far more Germanic due to large numbers of Germans and Scandinavians who originally settled there.
California, like most U.S. states, was once majority German, but now Mexicans are in the majority. Much of rural United States is still majority German, however. All of the light blue counties on this map are majority German. That's like most of the county.

 
Old August 4th, 2018 #12
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Originally Posted by Nikola Bijeliti View Post
California, like most U.S. states, was once majority German, but now Mexicans are in the majority.
Yep . .
Wonder when they will officially re-annex California as a province of Mexico . .








Quote:
Much of rural United States is still majority German, however. All of the light blue counties on this map are majority German. That's like most of the county.

Wow. .I didn't estimate the German concentration in the U.S. was that high . .

Ein herzliches Prosit an meine deutschstämmigen euroamerikianischen Brüder und Schwestern . .

 
Old August 4th, 2018 #13
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PM I received
Quote:
Hochdeutsch
So if I went to visit Germany and my German isn't already that well, I'd be advised to go to Hannover since people there are most easy to understand?
(https://vnnforum.com/showpost.php?p=2246830&postcount=3)
Well , I suppose yeah . .

Even though today the number of speakers of 'High-German' is growing in practically all areas whereas in the past a lot of Germans had problems communicating it . .

Yet , as you will see, not all Northern-Germans are so keen on High-German

For the record , this is the official Northern German hymn ( the Friesenlied . . .)

Lyrics . .

Quote:
Wo de Nordseewellen trecken an den Strand,
Wor de geelen Blumen bleuhn int gröne Land,
Wor de Möwen schrieen hell int Stormgebrus,
Dor is mine Heimat, dor bin ick to Hus.
Wor de Möwen schrieen hell int Stormgebrus,
Dor is mine Heimat, dor bin ick to Hus.

Wind und Wogen sungen mi dat Weegenleed,
Un de hohen Diek die kennt min Kinnertied,
Kennt ok all min Sehnsucht as noch lüt ick wär
In de Welt to flegen, ower Land un Meer.
Nun is all's verswunnen wat mi quält und dreev,
Hev dat Glück woll funnen, doch die Sehnsucht bleev.
That translates as . . . .
"Where the waves of the Northern Sea hit the beach ,
Where the yellow flowers bloom into the green countryside ,
Where the seagulls are screaming lightly into the roaring storm ,
This is where my home is, that's where I'm at home .
Where the seagulls are screaming lightly into the roaring storm ,
This is where my home is, that's where I'm at home .



Wind and swells are droning as my lullaby ,
And the high dikes know my early days ,
And knows all my yearning when I still was small
To fly unto the world, over land and sea .
Now everything has vanished what used to torment and drive me ,
Sure have found the fortune, yet the yearning remains ."



Well , at least it's the official hymn. . .

The "unofficial" . .

The melody is based on 'The Wild Rover' by the way

 
Old August 8th, 2018 #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdFire View Post
Yep . .
Wonder when they will officially re-annex California as a province of Mexico . .

Sierra Madre - Lyrics









Wow. .I didn't estimate the German concentration in the U.S. was that high . .

Ein herzliches Prosit an meine deutschstämmigen euroamerikianischen Brüder und Schwestern . .

We should annex Mexico, at least then we would have their resources rather than just having their people.
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Old August 9th, 2018 #15
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Originally Posted by joeylowsac View Post
We should annex Mexico, at least then we would have their resources rather than just having their people.
Would be an idea even though presently it looks the other way round ( that Mexicans annex Cali ) . .

They live large on your economy . .

After all , the USA and Mexico are one First-world country and one Third-World country bordering each other . .


All they have to do is cross the Tortilla Curtain . .


It's almost like entering from . .


to . .


 
Old August 9th, 2018 #16
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Originally Posted by joeylowsac View Post
We should annex Mexico, at least then we would have their resources rather than just having their people.
That would be the best gift to the Mexicans we could possibly give them. It would be the same as inviting all of them here but sparing them the trouble of moving. That's what nearly every Mexican wishes for. Only the elites would be opposed.

There is a joke in Mexico: What was the United States' biggest mistake in the Mexican-American War? They didn't annex all of Mexico!
 
Old August 9th, 2018 #17
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Originally Posted by Nikola Bijeliti View Post
That would be the best gift to the Mexicans we could possibly give them. It would be the same as inviting all of them here but sparing them the trouble of moving. That's what nearly every Mexican wishes for.
It sure would be fun being a state of undereducated mongrels being incorporated into quite a successful First-World nation . .


( sorry for posting this particular vid since Puerto Rico is a different nation than Mexico yet in this vid was one of the few occasions where the spics were somewhat honest about their motives of wanting to enter the USA . .)

Quote:
Only the elites would be opposed.
Mexico's elite is , like virtually every elite of every country , comprised of Freemasons . .






Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdFire View Post
People from all races are involved in the NWO ( the Freemasons that is . . . ) . . The Freemasons are an internationalist bunch of supposed 'scholars' , more often than not forming the so called 'elite' of the respective countries . . . Politicians , scholars , pharmacists etc . .

YES , there is a huge network operative worldwide without revealing . .


They are all on the financial list of the NWO . .
https://vnnforum.com/showpost.php?p=2244343&postcount=4

Quote:
There is a joke in Mexico: What was the United States' biggest mistake in the Mexican-American War? They didn't annex all of Mexico!





 
Old August 10th, 2018 #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdFire View Post
Would be an idea even though presently it looks the other way round ( that Mexicans annex Cali ) . .

They live large on your economy . .

After all , the USA and Mexico are one First-world country and one Third-World country bordering each other . .


All they have to do is cross the Tortilla Curtain . .


It's almost like entering from . .


to . .


Manu Chao - Clandestino (Official Video)
Actually, if the farmers had to pay minimum wage to get the crops in (not to mention having a care for the extremely unhealthy conditions of those chemical-soaked fields) the price of food would go up so high that we would quickly have a problem more serious than the illegal immigration. Until that changes, our putative 'two-party' system will continue to pretend to be at odds about immigration so as to maintain the status quo.
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Old August 10th, 2018 #19
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Another PM . .

Quote:
Hey First, thanks dude for clarifying my question concerning standard German..In the same thread you said that the American south was influenced by Scotland .....Could this maybe be the reason why the beverage of Whiskey is associated with the American south??

Just wondering..

You seem to be keen on this subject and I'm interested.....Thank you

For the record, in case you're wondering, I'm a New Zealander of 100% English heritage.
lol

Well , don't really know . .

All I'm aware of is that the American South was the most 'Scottish' part of the US . .

The southern 'upper-class' , rich salve owners , factory owners , i. e. capitalists were mostly of Scottish origin . .

As for Whiskey , it is mostly associated with the USA today , especially the times of the Old West . .


But of course European settlers from back in Europe brought it with them. .

There is still some kind of controversy though whether it was the Scots or the Irish who invented Whiskey . .

Anyway , the word 'Whiskey' is derived from the Celtic expression 'uisge beatha' , meaning 'water of life' . .



Whiskey is a very popular drink the Celtic influenced world . .

Not too sure about your question about the American south though . .

For the record, isn't this the most famous American Southern beverage ?


It's more of a liqueur . .

Good stuff by the way . .

 
Old August 10th, 2018 #20
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Quote:
Anyway , the word 'Whiskey' is derived from the Celtic expression 'uisge beatha' , meaning 'water of life'..
'Vodka' means 'little water', from the Russian word for water, 'Voda.'
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