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Old May 9th, 2017 #1
NewsFeed
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Post A New Addition to the Human Family Tree is Surprisingly Young

The one thing everyone agrees is that the fossils themselves are spectacular. In 2015, researchers unveiled 1,500 hominin fossils found deep in a South African cave, excavated by six cavers who were all skinny, short, and female. The hominin, a new species the team christened Homo naledi, was an unusual mix of the old and modern. Their heads were small, suggesting an early hominin perhaps more than million years old. But their feet were stiff for walking upright and their hands adept like modern humans.

So in the media frenzy that followed—a National Geographic cover, a documentary, numerous articles—the question kept coming up: How old are these Homo naledi fossils, really? What do they tell us, if anything, about the origin of Homo sapiens?

To that first question, the researchers now have an answer: 236,000 to 335,000 years old. As for the second question, well, it’s complicated. “You can’t tell simple stories anymore,” says Lee Berger, a paleoanthropologist at the University of the Witwatersrand who led the research. “This is the gigantic message out of Homo naledi.” The age of these fossils puts these strange, small-brained yet human-like hominins in South Africa just before the emergence of the first anatomically modern Homo sapiens.

The Homo naledi fossils were hidden in a pitch-black cave nearly impossible to access. What else would researchers find if they looked harder? “We don’t have many fossils from this time period at all in Africa,” says Carol Ward, an anthropologist at the University of Missouri, who was not involved in the Homo naledi research. But Homo naledi suggests more diversity in Africa in this period than previously thought.

In fact, fossils found over the past several decades have increasingly complicated our understanding of human evolution. Our early ancestors did not simply become bigger brained and more upright over time. They also begat other lineages—Homo naledi is an example; Homo neanderthalensis in Europe is another—of which modern humans are the only extant branch. The dating of Homo naledi to a minimum of 236,000 years old provokes more questions, and Berger is no stranger to provocations.

All of this is addressed in three new papers from Berger and his collaborators—totaling over 100 pages—published today in the journal eLife. The first paper provides the age of the original fossils. The second announces the discovery of a second chamber in the same South African cave system, containing over 130 Homo naledi fossils including a nearly complete skull. The third and most speculative paper takes up the question of how Homo naledi evolved and revisits a controversial hypothesis for the presence of these fossils in the cave.

The dating paper has solid evidence—at least as solid as you can get with ancient bones. “They have thrown basically every available dating method in the book at the remains,” says Justin Adams, a paleontologist at Monash University who has also worked in South African caves. The study

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read full article at source: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/...D=ansmsnnews11
 
Old May 9th, 2017 #2
Emily Henderson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewsFeed View Post
The one thing everyone agrees is that the fossils themselves are spectacular. In 2015, researchers unveiled 1,500 hominin fossils found deep in a South African cave, excavated by six cavers who were all skinny, short, and female. The hominin, a new species the team christened Homo naledi, was an unusual mix of the old and modern. Their heads were small, suggesting an early hominin perhaps more than million years old. But their feet were stiff for walking upright and their hands adept like modern humans.

So in the media frenzy that followed—a National Geographic cover, a documentary, numerous articles—the question kept coming up: How old are these Homo naledi fossils, really? What do they tell us, if anything, about the origin of Homo sapiens?

To that first question, the researchers now have an answer: 236,000 to 335,000 years old. As for the second question, well, it’s complicated. “You can’t tell simple stories anymore,” says Lee Berger, a paleoanthropologist at the University of the Witwatersrand who led the research. “This is the gigantic message out of Homo naledi.” The age of these fossils puts these strange, small-brained yet human-like hominins in South Africa just before the emergence of the first anatomically modern Homo sapiens.

The Homo naledi fossils were hidden in a pitch-black cave nearly impossible to access. What else would researchers find if they looked harder? “We don’t have many fossils from this time period at all in Africa,” says Carol Ward, an anthropologist at the University of Missouri, who was not involved in the Homo naledi research. But Homo naledi suggests more diversity in Africa in this period than previously thought.

In fact, fossils found over the past several decades have increasingly complicated our understanding of human evolution. Our early ancestors did not simply become bigger brained and more upright over time. They also begat other lineages—Homo naledi is an example; Homo neanderthalensis in Europe is another—of which modern humans are the only extant branch. The dating of Homo naledi to a minimum of 236,000 years old provokes more questions, and Berger is no stranger to provocations.

All of this is addressed in three new papers from Berger and his collaborators—totaling over 100 pages—published today in the journal eLife. The first paper provides the age of the original fossils. The second announces the discovery of a second chamber in the same South African cave system, containing over 130 Homo naledi fossils including a nearly complete skull. The third and most speculative paper takes up the question of how Homo naledi evolved and revisits a controversial hypothesis for the presence of these fossils in the cave.

The dating paper has solid evidence—at least as solid as you can get with ancient bones. “They have thrown basically every available dating method in the book at the remains,” says Justin Adams, a paleontologist at Monash University who has also worked in South African caves. The study

----- snip -----


read full article at source: http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/...D=ansmsnnews11

They don't want you to really understand this--that we may be further apart as a genome from Nigs than we realize, even right now.

If separated, eventually the races would be incapable of interbreeding. It happens in all genomes, and we're animals, too, so it would occur in humans over long enough periods of time in certain conditions.

I think most Whites have instincts that reflect this already being 'in progress' if you will (stark enough differences to produce a fearful 'look-out' response in the presence of 'the other'), but they are conditioning people not to recognize this instinct and to 'fight' it. Sick.
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