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Old October 17th, 2009 #1
Alex Linder
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Default Fish!

[video of fish through link below]

September 22, 2009—UPDATE: A gelatinous fish found off Brazil's Bahia coast has been touted as a previously unknown species. But the six-foot-long, toothed oddity may be a known member of a group of mysterious bottom-dwellers known as jellynose fish, another expert says.

Scientists in Brazil found what they thought was a strange, new species of fish off the coast of Bahia.

The fish was over six feet long, with a long tail and was found floating on the surface of the ocean by researchers from the TAMAR project, a sea turtle conservation project.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Guy Marcovaldi, TAMAR Project: "At first, I got really scared when I saw this huge thing in the water. But then, I decided to jump in the water and film it."

But within the scientific realm, this family of fishes is actually well-known.

According to David Johnson, an ichthyologist with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the specimen is part of a group of fishes known as Jellynoses.

They aren't often seen, though, because they are bottom dwellers living at depths beyond a thousand feet.

These fish may reach a length of around 6 feet, and weigh about 100 pounds interesting, considering that they start their lives at just a half an inch in length as seen in this photo.

They have small teeth, no scales and are gelatinous with a large body fat content not good for eating.

This fish has been preserved in formaldehyde, and will be maintained in the zoology department at the Federal University of Bahia. Could this be a new species of Jellynose? Dave Johnson says it's possible, but unlikely, and the only way to determine that is through careful study.

But, new species are being identified all the time. Currently, there are around 30,000 known species of fishes in the world, and scientists believe there are thousands of others yet to be described.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...-video-ap.html
 
Old October 17th, 2009 #2
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No scales, how odd. I wonder how that benefits them?
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Old October 18th, 2009 #3
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Fisherman reels in monster 6ft perch... after battling with a CROCODILE



By James Tozer
16th October 2009

It's not often that you'd describe the angler, rather than the fish, as the one that got away.

But that was certainly the case for Tim Smith, who lived to tell the tale after tussling with a crocodile over this monster 6ft Nile perch.

The art teacher, 39, had already been engaged in a titanic battle to reel in the 249lb fish for 45 minutes in his tiny motor boat on the Victoria Nile in Uganda when he realised he had a fiercer rival.

Fortunately, however, it was the 39-year-old art teacher who turned out to be the one that got away, managing to tether his catch to the boat before firing the motor into life, leaving his opponent empty-mouthed in his wake.

And he was able to pose by his giant prize - which may be a record - for this spectacular photograph.

Back from his Ugandan trip and home to mercifully crocodile-free Northern Ireland, he told yesterday of his transformation from being the hunter to the hunted.

He had been grappling with the fish while in a small boat on the Victoria Nile in Uganda, about a mile downstream from the stunning Murchison Falls, for about 45 minutes when he realised he had competition.

'Suddenly the boat lurched and I nearly fell out,' he said. 'I didn't really know what had happened.

'The next thing is, the crocodile launches itself at me, mouth wide open.'
Nile perch

Catch of the day: Even a hungry crocodile struggled to fit the perch in its jaws

Fortunately it had misjudged its jump and fell short, hitting the side of the boat.

'If it had launched itself another foot I'm sure it would have got hold of me,' he added.

'It obviously hit the front of the boat to try and knock me out and then went to the other side.

'When you realise something that size is trying to eat you, it's really quite daunting. I just fell back into the centre of the boat, still holding the rod.'

By then the fish had almost given up the fight, lying flat on the water close to the boat, giving the reptile its final chance.

'I just saw the crocodile swim up and grab the fish's tail and spin it around in a death roll, but because of the size of the fish it couldn't get a proper grip,' said Mr Smith.

That enabled him to grab his catch, tie it to the side of the boat, pull up the anchor and make his getaway - and just in time.

'By the time I got the engine started the crocodile was just coming around,' he said. 'I slammed into gear and the croc dived and disappeared.'

Mr Smith, who works at Portora Royal School in Enniskillen, then drifted down the river, tied the fish to a tree and went to a nearby wildlife safari lodge to get help.

He is now applying to the International Game Fish Association to have his Nile perch established as a record - until now, the heaviest caught on a rod and line weighed just 230lb.

Nile perch - which themselves have a voracious appetite - were controversially introduced to Lake Victoria and surrounding rivers in the 1950s, quickly decimating native species.

They have, however, provided a useful source of income for local people, both through commercial fishing for export to Europe and also international angling tourism.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz0UM3BlxFF
 
Old October 19th, 2009 #4
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Good stuff, fishing is one of my favorite things... One I caught a few months ago.

 
Old October 19th, 2009 #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Clarke View Post
Good stuff, fishing is one of my favorite things... One I caught a few months ago.

Striped Bass? GOOOOOD eatin'.
 
Old October 19th, 2009 #6
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Nice fish!

When I first saw that perch, I thought it was a photoshop.

What's the biggest fish you ever caught?

My record for largemouth bass is 5.75 lbs, landed in private pond outside Kirksville.

I have also caught an 11-lb carp out of the Jordan in Salt Lake City.
 
Old October 19th, 2009 #7
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That fish is in the foreground and the man is a ways back from it. Looks like just a trick.
 
Old October 20th, 2009 #8
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Hey Scott have you noticed a decline in the # of stripers and their average size over the past 5-10 yrs? I surfcast off the coast of Mass and I haven't caught one over 40 lbs in years.
 
Old October 26th, 2009 #9
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[Holy fucking Christ... Hitler wasn't kidding when he said life's a struggle.]

10-foot Great White Shark bitten nearly in half by 20-foot 'monster shark' near Australian beach

By Ethan Sacks
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Monday, October 26th 2009, 10:30 AM


A 10-foot shark was bitten nearly in half by a 'monster shark' twice it's size - and that Great White is still on the prowl off the coast of Queensland, Australian officials said.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water...

Swimmers were warned that a "monster shark" was prowling off a popular Australian beach, one that nearly bit a 10-foot great white shark in half last week, London's Daily Mail reported.

Based on the bite marks, experts say the larger shark must be twice its victim's size.

The smaller - relatively speaking - great white was hooked on a baited drum line when it was attacked, and was still alive when it was hauled onto a boat off north Stradbroke Island in Queensland.

The fatally wounded shark was found just a few miles away from the island's popular beaches, a haven for surfers and bathers.

"That cannibal thing is what great whites do; they'll eat anything, including their own kind," Hugh Edwards, a local shark expert, told Australia's 7 News. "It would be sensible not to swim in that area for a little while."

Though shark attacks worldwide dipped from 71 to 59 between 2007 and 2008, according to the International Shark Attack File, and few of them were attributed to great whites, the large shark had been vilified even before Steven Spielberg's 1975 thriller.

Speculation is that this "Jaws"-sized shark has been lured to the area by the rotting carcuses of three whales that were trapped in anti-shark netting surrounding the Queensland coast.

But Queensland Fisheries Minister Tim Mulherin told Australia's Courier Mail that the grisly find shows why those nets were still essential.

Five people were fatally attacked in the late '50s, the Courier Mail reported, but only one since the nets were put in place in 1962.

"Whatever attacked and took chunks out of this big shark must be massive," surfer Ashton Smith, 19, told the Daily Mail. "I've heard about the big one that's lurking out there somewhere.

"We're all being very, very cautious."

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/worl...near_aust.html
 
Old November 7th, 2009 #11
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'IT'S A WONDER' Suspected killer's fish lives after seven months alone in a townhouse
November 07, 2009 4:28 PM

MIRAMAR BEACH — When employees from Contractor’s Choice and members of the homeowners association walked into alleged murderer Danny Baker’s long-vacant townhouse, they expected to find mold. But they were shocked to find a fish had survived seven months without food or clean water.

The fish, which appears to be a plecostomus and blends in with the rocks in his large tank, was overlooked when police came into the home to remove Baker’s other fish and birds. He was almost overlooked a second time, as much of the water in his tank had evaporated, and the remaining water was black with filth by the time the townhouse was opened for cleaning.

“I was very upset because I thought the police had taken everything after Danny’s arrest,” said Dianne Richmond, vice president of the homeowner’s association. “This poor fish has been in that boiling house with no air conditioning and nothing to eat for about seven months.”

The first floor of the townhouse is dominated by a fish tank that is built into the wall and stretches almost the entire length of the living room. The remaining space is filled with a couch and four bunk beds, as well as two more fish tanks in a corner. Large bird cages, which according to a neighbor held birds that could recite prayers and say “I love you Danny,” cover the back patio.

The fish went unnoticed for so long because Baker’s home was closed to the homeowners association after his arrest in February for allegedly shooting five Chilean students in his Miramar Beach subdivision with a rifle. Two were killed and three were seriously injured before Baker barricaded himself in his townhouse. He surrendered to police the next morning, and is currently awaiting trial.

Months later as workers began the long process of cleaning and removing mold, the fiancee of Contractor’s Choice owner, David Fritz, noticed something moving in the tank. After sprinkling some fish food in the water, the plecostomus immediately moved for his first real meal in months.

Josh Olis, an account manager at Contractor’s Choice, said he didn’t believe it when his boss told him a fish was still living in that tank, and he had to see it for himself. After confirming the fish’s existence, he and the owner put about 50 gallons of water back in the tank. He said he would continue to make sure the fish was fed for as long as the company is working in the home.

“I think we’re going to accept him into the cleaning family for now,” Olis said. “He’s been living in that tank for so long, surviving off algae. I have so much respect for him, I had to name him.”

As of press time, the future of Theo, as Olis calls the survivor, was still up in the air. Richmond and employees from Contractor’s Choice said they will continue to care for him for now but hope to find someone to give him a permanent home.

“This poor fish has really worked for a new home,” Richmond said. “It’s a wonder he’s survived this.”

http://www.thedestinlog.com/news/won...mar-alone.html
 
Old November 8th, 2009 #12
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Fangtooth Fish

The Fangtooth fish is found in midwater depths of about five kilometers (three miles). They are extremely muscular and their teeth are so long that when the jaw is shut, the lower pair must slide into special sheathes on either side of the fish’s brain to avoid impaling it.

 
Old November 8th, 2009 #13
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The biggest fish I ever caught was a brown trout in Edwards, CO, near my mother's place. The beast was well over 20 pounds. It was in a pond on the Cordillera golf course. It took me over half an hour to reel it in on a fly rod with 8 pound test line. Once I finally did get it ashore I saw that its mouth had developed grotesque protuberances which looked like spikes. It was, quite simply, an aquatic monster! I didn't have a camera on me and had no intention of trying to eat the thing, so I returned it to its native habitat, exhausted as it was from the fight.

The bookend of this little "big fish" tale is that a Mexican kid later poached the thing out of the same pond with some help from his dad. They took a picture, and his family feasted on the beast.

The photo and story ended up in the local paper. I told my mother several years later when she recalled the newspaper story and its connections to my post-catch ravings to her after I had caught it: "That's the fish I told you about!!!"
 
Old November 17th, 2009 #14
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Piranha found in Palm Springs pond
Wildlife officials believe fish came from aquarium, apply poison to pond

They're a staple of B-movies, relentless aquatic killers, swarming hapless victims and stripping the flesh from their bones.

They are the South American piranha. And they've come to Palm Beach County.

Jake Duchene, 15, hooked a red-bellied piranha about three weeks ago in a retention pond near his Palm Springs townhome. Since then, state wildlife officials have found two more, and on Tuesday poisoned the whole lake to get rid of any straggling piranhas.

Jake Duchene, who found the first one, went from elated to deflated as he watched officials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission pump rotenone into the pond, killing everything inside.

"My son is beside himself," said his father, Darren Duchene, 47. "I think it's ridiculous to poison the whole lake."

Real piranhas are a far cry from their celluloid portrayal, but extremely destructive in a non-native habitat like South Florida, said William Fink, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan.

"That's the reason they're illegal," he said, referring to a Florida law banning piranhas. "They will get loose and they can potentially breed."

Fink said piranhas can easily take over habitats. He's never heard of a single case of a piranha killing a human, but they will attack birds, other fish and even larger animals.

Fink said piranhas are popular pets because of their unearned reputations as man-eaters. But upkeep can be expensive and feeding them — they'll often only eat live meals — can be a pain, Fink said.

"People can't afford to keep them fed or they get sick of them and they dump them in a pond," he said.

State officials think that's exactly how the three piranhas got loose. They defended poisoning the lake Tuesday, saying it helped them find the two others.

"The consequences of leaving piranhas in the water could be absolutely horrendous for the habitat," said Gabrielle Ferraro, spokeswoman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/pal...464,full.story
 
Old November 18th, 2009 #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oy Ze Hate View Post
The biggest fish I ever caught was a brown trout in Edwards, CO, near my mother's place. The beast was well over 20 pounds. It was in a pond on the Cordillera golf course. It took me over half an hour to reel it in on a fly rod with 8 pound test line. Once I finally did get it ashore I saw that its mouth had developed grotesque protuberances which looked like spikes. It was, quite simply, an aquatic monster! I didn't have a camera on me and had no intention of trying to eat the thing, so I returned it to its native habitat, exhausted as it was from the fight.

The bookend of this little "big fish" tale is that a Mexican kid later poached the thing out of the same pond with some help from his dad. They took a picture, and his family feasted on the beast.

The photo and story ended up in the local paper. I told my mother several years later when she recalled the newspaper story and its connections to my post-catch ravings to her after I had caught it: "That's the fish I told you about!!!"
That wasn't a brown trout OZH, it was a catfish or bullhead. Did those protuberances look like this:

 
Old January 4th, 2010 #16
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Man sentenced in LA for smuggling fish into US

12/31/2009

LOS ANGELES—A man who tried to smuggle six endangered fish into Los Angeles has been fined $7,500 and sentenced to six months of house arrest, two years probation and 200 hours of community service.

A federal judge this week in Los Angeles sentenced 35-year-old Ricky Vu of Garden Grove.

Federal prosecutors say Vu hid six Asian Arowanas, also known as dragon fish or lucky fish, in his luggage on a commercial flight Sept. 28 from Indonesia. They are illegal in the United States without a permit and worth thousands of dollars on the black market.

Authorities says the fish, which can grow to 3 feet long, were found alive in bags of water when his luggage was searched.

Vu pleaded guilty in October to a misdemeanor charge of illegally importing the endangered fish into the United States.

http://www.mercurynews.com/news/ci_14100540
 
Old January 4th, 2010 #17
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Carp and the Lakes

December 28, 2009

Unwelcome species don’t get much more unwelcome than Asian bighead and silver carp, which were imported to Southern fish farms in the 1970’s, escaped into the Mississippi system and have spent a decade or more moving slowly upriver toward the Great Lakes.
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The fish are fertile and voracious, crowding out native species by vacuuming up algae and plankton. They are also bizarrely dangerous to boaters, erupting from the water like self-hurling bricks.

Ever since the fish started heading north, ecologists have warned about the devastation that awaits if they get loose in the Great Lakes, unchecked by natural predators and muscling out every competing species. It is not just the lakes’ $7 billion fishing industry that could be blighted by carp, it’s the entire ecosystem, already badly compromised by other invasive species and pollution.

The watery path that could seal the Great Lakes’ doom is the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, which links the Mississippi River system to the Great Lakes. Electrified underwater barriers erected by the United States Army Corps of Engineers in the canal may already have failed; carp DNA has been detected on the wrong side of the fences.

The federal Environmental Protection Agency is spending a modest $13 million to tighten the canal’s defenses, by shoring up low-lying land beside the canal and nearby carp-infested waterways so the carp can’t ride floodwaters past barricades and into Lake Michigan. In a case that has just reached the United States Supreme Court, Michigan is suing Illinois and the Army Corps to force the closing of two canal locks that give a direct route into the lake.

The only sure way to stop carp — and whatever other invasive species are waiting — is to close the canal and again separate the Mississippi and Great Lakes watersheds. That would be hugely costly and politically difficult, given the importance of shipping to the region.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/29/opinion/29tue3.html
 
Old March 11th, 2010 #18
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When I was kid, I loved fishing...100 meters from my house is river with
Brown trout...i loved to catch those brave and strong fishes.

In Slavonia, North part of Croatia, on river Danube, there is realy big fish...
Wels catfish


This "bastard" was captured in Vukovar...95 kilos...240 centemeters long (2,4 meters)
http://www.javno.com/hr-hrvatska/ulo...lograma/259755

And how is catfish hunts in Croatia?

People have smal river boats, then they catch small fish to use it as bait for catfish. Hunt is during night, when catfish took bait and hook itself, he drives boat across river....for many hours....during that "fish" drive, Croats usually drinks and sing. When catfish exost it's power, then fishermans rise it from river to surface ad kill it...

Once I must try that...whole night of riding in small boat with drunken guys
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Old March 11th, 2010 #19
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No scales, how odd. I wonder how that benefits them?
Silly you! That makes it non-kosher and keeps Jews from eating it.
 
Old August 27th, 2010 #20
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Default Australian marine biologists discover new species, using a remote-controlled camera

Photogallery:

http://bazonline.ch/wissen/natur/Fre...story/27685672

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