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Old July 28th, 2018 #42
Alex Linder
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By Bradford Richardson - The Washington Times - Monday, May 21, 2018
The vast majority of students at Pomona College say the campus climate prevents people from sharing controversial ideas for fear of offending others.

A survey conducted by Gallup and the Knight Foundation found that many students at the liberal arts college in Claremont, California, do not feel comfortable expressing their political views with their professors or peers.

Eighty-eight percent of students agreed that the climate on campus prevents students and faculty “from saying things they believe because others might find them offensive.” Slightly more than half of all college students nationwide said the same. Among the Pomona College faculty, 63 percent agreed the climate has a chilling effect on potentially offensive speech.

A rising sophomore at Pomona College, who wished to remain anonymous, said he was afraid of being “socially shunned” for going against the “campus culture dogma” at Pomona.

“Unfortunately, because college is supposed to be some of the most fulfilling years of my life socially, I don’t want to risk being ostracized, and that results in less honest campus discourse,” the student told the Claremont Independent, which first reported the survey.

The study was commissioned by the college’s Task Force on Public Dialogue, which was established by


The study was commissioned by the college’s Task Force on Public Dialogue, which was established by Pomona’s board of trustees last year to look for ways to support “free speech and democratic ideals with a commitment to ensuring an equitable and inclusive environment for all students.”

Non-liberal students were more likely to report that they are not comfortable expressing their political views at Pomona. Thirty-five percent of conservatives and moderates said they feel comfortable talking about politics with their professors and 21 percent with other students.

A large minority of liberal students also said they are not comfortable sharing their political views on campus. Sixty-eight percent said they are comfortable expressing their political beliefs with professors, while 66 percent said they are comfortable talking about politics with other students.

Self-identified “very liberal” students expressed the least anxiety with sharing their political views. Seventy-two percent said they are comfortable discussing their political beliefs with their professors, and 85 percent said they have no trouble talking about politics with their peers.

Non-liberal students were also more likely to say that Pomona College has gone too far to discourage offensive or insensitive speech.

Among conservatives and moderates, 28 percent said the college was doing too much to restrict speech on campus, compared to 7 percent of liberal and 2 percent of very liberal students. On the other side, 41 percent of very liberal students said the college has not gone far enough to restrict offensive speech, compared to 19 percent of liberal and 5 percent of conservative or moderate students.

Students of color were also more likely to say that the college should prohibit certain types of speech on campus. Thirty-two percent of black, 31 percent of Hispanic and 29 percent of Asian students said colleges should be able to restrict “political views that are upsetting or offensive to certain groups,” compared to 17 percent of white students.

The majority of Pomona College students, 53 percent, identify as liberal. Twenty-four percent identify as very liberal, 16 percent as moderate and 3 percent as conservative. Students who haven’t thought about politics (3 percent) outnumber very conservative students (0 percent).

The political breakdown of the Pomona College faculty is nearly identical to that of the student body. Fifty-four percent identify as liberal, 27 percent as very liberal, 14 percent as moderate, 4 percent as conservative and 0 percent as very conservative. One percent said they haven’t thought enough about politics.

The survey included responses from 592 students and 146 faculty members at Pomona College. Approximately 35 percent of students and 66 percent of the faculty completed the survey.

In an email Friday to the student body, Pomona College President Gabrielle Starr said the school “must confront the link between climate and free and open dialogue.”

“It is clear that dialogue cannot be addressed without attention to improving the inclusivity of our community,” Ms. Starr wrote. “If the climate on campus is tenuous, speech easily becomes charged. When trust is broken, the call to action is urgent. As your president, I will do everything in my power to help our community come together to rebuild trust. I will count on each and every one of us to bring good faith to this work.”

https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...s-free-speech/

Last edited by Alex Linder; July 28th, 2018 at 09:20 PM.
 
Old July 28th, 2018 #43
notmenomore
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Quote:
“It is clear that dialogue cannot be addressed without attention to improving the inclusivity of our community,” Ms. Starr wrote.
So who's not being "included" enough? Kwanservatives?


Quote:
“If the climate on campus is tenuous, speech easily becomes charged. When trust is broken, the call to action is urgent. As your president, I will do everything in my power to help our community come together to rebuild trust."
I'm not getting exactly what the trust that [has been?] lost is, nor how it [whatever it is] became lost.
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Old July 28th, 2018 #44
Alex Linder
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https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...th-a-white-su/

Calif. college students: Objective truth a 'white supremacist' idea
Activists say allowing conservative Heather Mac Donald to speak 'a form of violence'
 
Old July 28th, 2018 #45
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...yeah, that niggerized clap-trap is just poorly formed, undergraduate post-modernism from doofus-brains who prolly can't even give a passable history of the origins and current state of Marxist post-modern solipsism. Solipsism is mainly it anyway, methinks.
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Old July 29th, 2018 #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notmenomore View Post
...yeah, that niggerized clap-trap is just poorly formed, undergraduate post-modernism from doofus-brains who prolly can't even give a passable history of the origins and current state of Marxist post-modern solipsism. Solipsism is mainly it anyway, methinks.
well the "beautiful mind" Anglos have kicked out anyone like me, surrounded themselves with coloreds, they can enjoy the hurricane
 
Old August 17th, 2018 #47
Alex Linder
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[post 47 - a fetish number with Pomona. anyway...just a typical example of taking every last normal thing they can find and turning it into a problem they can solve with deviant sex and neo-marxist politics. notice the left obsession with 'reproduction' - in every way but the normal, physical]

by Tyler Durden
Thu, 08/16/2018 - 20:05

Authored by Caroline Ryan via Campus Reform,

This school year, students across the country will attend courses on “Queering the Bible,” “Queering Childhood,” “Queering Theology,” and similar topics.

Students at Pomona College in Claremont, California, for instance, will have the opportunity to enroll in a brand new course titled “Queering Childhood,” which will examine “the figure of the Child and how this figuration is used by politics, law, and medicine to justify continued cultural investment in reproductive heteronormativity and productive ablebodiedness.”

The course description explains that students will examine the childhoods of “queer and crip children,” as well as “childhoods against which the figure of the Child is articulated,” with reference to work related to “gender studies, childhood studies, disability studies, and queer theory.”

Colleges are not only attempting to “queer” childhood, they are teaching students to “queer” Christianity and religion in general, as well.

This fall, Eugene Lang College will offer a course titled "Queering and Decolonizing Theology,” where students will explore topics such as “the sexual ethics and ritualization found in the S&M community,” and “transgender Christs.”

“Christian theology is often depicted as a violent colonial force standing in particular opposition to LGBTQI lives. However, over the last 30 years people of faith, activists, and theorists alike have rediscovered what is queer within Christianity, uncovered what is religious within secular queer communities, and used postcolonial theory to decolonize lived religious practices and theologies,” the course description asserts.

According to the college, the course “explores secular philosophies of queer and postcolonial theory as well as their critical and constructive application to religion,” focusing on topics like “the sexual ethics and ritualization found in the S&M community, transgender Christs, and the mestiza (or mixed) cultures of Latin America.”

Similarly, students at Harvard Divinity School will be able to attend a course on "Queer Theologies, Queer Religions" this fall, which will explore the “project of ‘queer theology’” and how it relates to “larger aspirations of queer religion or spirituality in America.”

In this course, students will begin by “sampling the efforts to revise traditional Christian theologies in order to accept or affirm same-sex loves.” After that, they will move on to examining “forgotten possibilities in historical engagements between advocates of homosexual rights and established religious bodies (chiefly churches and synagogues).”

“We will consider the boundaries between queer theology and queer theory or between it and other political theologies,” the course description explains. “We will test the boundaries of ‘Christianity’ while considering the varied forms of queer religion outside familiar religious institutions—in spirituality or spiritualism, in magic or neo-paganism, in erotic asceticism.”

Swarthmore College students, meanwhile, will survey “queer and trans* readings of biblical texts” during a course titled "Queering the Bible,” which will introduce them to “the complexity of constructions of sex, gender, and identity in one of the most influential literary works produced in ancient times.”

“By reading the Bible with the methods of queer and trans* theoretical approaches,” the description promises, “this class destabilizes long held assumptions about what the [B]ible—and religion—says about gender and sexuality.”

The University of San Francisco is also getting into the act with a course on "Christian Feminist Theology" that aims to “develop an understanding of how feminist scholarship provides one fruitful means towards reappropriation of central Christian insights about God.”

The course will facilitate “critical reflection upon the experience of God, and insights from feminist thought,” according to the description.

In a similar vein, students enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania’s "Gender, Sexuality, and Religion” course “will read religion through a variety of feminist and queer theory lenses- exploring the key characteristics of diverse feminist analyses of religion, as well as limits of specific feminist approaches.”

“In this course we will learn about women’s and men’s rituals, social roles, and mythologies in specific religious traditions,” the course description explains. “We will also look at the central significance of gender to the field of religious studies generally, with particular attention to non-binary genders.”

To that end, the course will address questions such as “How important are the gender differences in deciding social roles, ritual activities, and spiritual vocations?” and “How does gender intersect with nationality, language, and politics?”

Campus Reform reached out to each of the schools mentioned in this report for additional comment on the courses in question, and is currently awaiting responses. This article will be updated if and when any of them provide a statement.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-...children-bible
 
Old September 1st, 2018 #48
Erik T. White
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The way the fags are going, I can actually imagine the day when, if I kissed my wife in public, we could be arrested for hate crime against the LGBTQIRTOXVG, "community!!!!!!!!"
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