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Old October 17th, 2009 #1
Alex Linder
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Default Fish!

[video of fish through link below]

September 22, 2009—UPDATE: A gelatinous fish found off Brazil's Bahia coast has been touted as a previously unknown species. But the six-foot-long, toothed oddity may be a known member of a group of mysterious bottom-dwellers known as jellynose fish, another expert says.

Scientists in Brazil found what they thought was a strange, new species of fish off the coast of Bahia.

The fish was over six feet long, with a long tail and was found floating on the surface of the ocean by researchers from the TAMAR project, a sea turtle conservation project.

SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Guy Marcovaldi, TAMAR Project: "At first, I got really scared when I saw this huge thing in the water. But then, I decided to jump in the water and film it."

But within the scientific realm, this family of fishes is actually well-known.

According to David Johnson, an ichthyologist with the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the specimen is part of a group of fishes known as Jellynoses.

They aren't often seen, though, because they are bottom dwellers living at depths beyond a thousand feet.

These fish may reach a length of around 6 feet, and weigh about 100 pounds interesting, considering that they start their lives at just a half an inch in length as seen in this photo.

They have small teeth, no scales and are gelatinous with a large body fat content not good for eating.

This fish has been preserved in formaldehyde, and will be maintained in the zoology department at the Federal University of Bahia. Could this be a new species of Jellynose? Dave Johnson says it's possible, but unlikely, and the only way to determine that is through careful study.

But, new species are being identified all the time. Currently, there are around 30,000 known species of fishes in the world, and scientists believe there are thousands of others yet to be described.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...-video-ap.html
 
Old October 17th, 2009 #2
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No scales, how odd. I wonder how that benefits them?
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Old October 18th, 2009 #3
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Fisherman reels in monster 6ft perch... after battling with a CROCODILE



By James Tozer
16th October 2009

It's not often that you'd describe the angler, rather than the fish, as the one that got away.

But that was certainly the case for Tim Smith, who lived to tell the tale after tussling with a crocodile over this monster 6ft Nile perch.

The art teacher, 39, had already been engaged in a titanic battle to reel in the 249lb fish for 45 minutes in his tiny motor boat on the Victoria Nile in Uganda when he realised he had a fiercer rival.

Fortunately, however, it was the 39-year-old art teacher who turned out to be the one that got away, managing to tether his catch to the boat before firing the motor into life, leaving his opponent empty-mouthed in his wake.

And he was able to pose by his giant prize - which may be a record - for this spectacular photograph.

Back from his Ugandan trip and home to mercifully crocodile-free Northern Ireland, he told yesterday of his transformation from being the hunter to the hunted.

He had been grappling with the fish while in a small boat on the Victoria Nile in Uganda, about a mile downstream from the stunning Murchison Falls, for about 45 minutes when he realised he had competition.

'Suddenly the boat lurched and I nearly fell out,' he said. 'I didn't really know what had happened.

'The next thing is, the crocodile launches itself at me, mouth wide open.'
Nile perch

Catch of the day: Even a hungry crocodile struggled to fit the perch in its jaws

Fortunately it had misjudged its jump and fell short, hitting the side of the boat.

'If it had launched itself another foot I'm sure it would have got hold of me,' he added.

'It obviously hit the front of the boat to try and knock me out and then went to the other side.

'When you realise something that size is trying to eat you, it's really quite daunting. I just fell back into the centre of the boat, still holding the rod.'

By then the fish had almost given up the fight, lying flat on the water close to the boat, giving the reptile its final chance.

'I just saw the crocodile swim up and grab the fish's tail and spin it around in a death roll, but because of the size of the fish it couldn't get a proper grip,' said Mr Smith.

That enabled him to grab his catch, tie it to the side of the boat, pull up the anchor and make his getaway - and just in time.

'By the time I got the engine started the crocodile was just coming around,' he said. 'I slammed into gear and the croc dived and disappeared.'

Mr Smith, who works at Portora Royal School in Enniskillen, then drifted down the river, tied the fish to a tree and went to a nearby wildlife safari lodge to get help.

He is now applying to the International Game Fish Association to have his Nile perch established as a record - until now, the heaviest caught on a rod and line weighed just 230lb.

Nile perch - which themselves have a voracious appetite - were controversially introduced to Lake Victoria and surrounding rivers in the 1950s, quickly decimating native species.

They have, however, provided a useful source of income for local people, both through commercial fishing for export to Europe and also international angling tourism.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz0UM3BlxFF
 
Old October 19th, 2009 #4
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Good stuff, fishing is one of my favorite things... One I caught a few months ago.

 
Old October 19th, 2009 #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Clarke View Post
Good stuff, fishing is one of my favorite things... One I caught a few months ago.

Striped Bass? GOOOOOD eatin'.
 
Old October 19th, 2009 #6
Alex Linder
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Nice fish!

When I first saw that perch, I thought it was a photoshop.

What's the biggest fish you ever caught?

My record for largemouth bass is 5.75 lbs, landed in private pond outside Kirksville.

I have also caught an 11-lb carp out of the Jordan in Salt Lake City.
 
Old March 11th, 2010 #7
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Cool No Scales

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Originally Posted by COTW View Post
No scales, how odd. I wonder how that benefits them?
Silly you! That makes it non-kosher and keeps Jews from eating it.
 
Old August 27th, 2010 #8
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Default Australian marine biologists discover new species, using a remote-controlled camera

Photogallery:

http://bazonline.ch/wissen/natur/Fre...story/27685672

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Old August 27th, 2010 #9
Donald E. Pauly
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jewsign Species Identified

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This looks like a diving Jew to me.

Last edited by Donald E. Pauly; August 27th, 2010 at 06:22 PM. Reason: typo
 
Old April 20th, 2015 #10
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14 pound Large Mouth.
http://www.alloutdoor.com/2015/04/15...ught-released/
 
Old July 5th, 2015 #11
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Default Starfish which clone live longer than those which mate:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...ing-older.html

Quote:
...The discovery relates to what are known as tiny structures called telomeres - biological caps found at the ends of chromosomes...

...Lengths of telomeres protect genetic data, make it possible for cells to divide, and hold some of the secrets of how humans age and develop cancer...
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Old December 3rd, 2012 #12
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New species of fish



A NEW species of fish has been named after President Barack Obama by the researchers who discovered it.

The freshwater fish has distinctive bright orange and blue colours and is generally found in fast-flowing rivers around America.

It is one of five new species of darter - the smallest member of the perch family - to be discovered in recent months. The remaining four species have been named after three other presidents and one vice-president.

The tiny fish - which are normally under 50mm in length - have been spotted by researchers from Geosyntec Consultants and Saint Louis University in waters in Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Tennessee.

New species of fish | The Nation
 
Old January 8th, 2013 #13
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Fish story lands in NC's high court, $1M on line
By By EMERY P. DALESIO | Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — About four hours after the fishing charter boat Citation left dock on the Outer Banks to compete in one of the country's richest deep-sea fishing tournaments, crewmembers were in the fight of their lives. Something huge was hooked, but it was invisible to human sight as it dove for the ocean bottom about 27 miles off the North Carolina coast.

Five hours later they hauled up a monster, an 883-pound, 14-foot-long blue marlin. They knew the silvery-blue torpedo of muscle bigger than a bear would mean a huge payday in the June 2010 Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament when they recorded their catch in coastal Morehead City.

"When we finally saw it we couldn't believe it," the Citation's captain, Eric Holmes of Buxton, said at the time. "To catch a fish this big ... it's something. It really is. We got lucky and it's good to be lucky."

But their luck soured. The boat's owners landed in a fight for the $910,000 in prize money that continued Tuesday with arguments to North Carolina's Supreme Court.

Tournament officials disqualified the Citation's crew because the 22-year-old first mate, Peter Wann of Alexandria, Va., did not have a $15 North Carolina fishing license when the fish was hooked. His license was purchased while the Citation was still two hours out to sea and chugging toward a landing.

Tournament rules state that a fishing license is required for everyone aboard a participating vessel, said E. Bradley Evans, a lawyer for the contest's organizers. That rule was also emphasized at a pre-tournament meeting that Holmes and Wann did not attend.

The non-profit group that runs the tournament has no gain in disqualifying the Citation, but did so to protect the contest's integrity, Evans said.

"If none of the rules are material, then people could take rifles and shoot fish. They could fish at any hours of the day if they want to," Evans said. He said the rules were critical to the operation of the tournament and the most important aspect.

Wann thought the Citation had a blanket license that covered the entire crew, and when he found out there may have been a question if his license was active he got online while still miles at sea and bought another while still outside the state's territorial waters, which extend three miles from shore, said Darren Jackson, an attorney for the boat's owners.

"Maybe it was just luck that they happened to have a computer with internet access out in the middle of the ocean, but they did. And they did get the license," Jackson said.

State regulators couldn't decide when or if Wann violated state fishing laws and had to amend the citation they issued the mate, Jackson said. While one tournament rule said North Carolina required a recreational fishing license for anyone aboard, the language didn't state that failing to follow the state law could lead to disqualification from the contest, Jackson said. Disqualification for violating the fishing license rule was as unreasonable as if the same punishment were leveled for other violations that didn't tilt the competition, like going too fast in a "no wake" zone or failing to have the proper number of lifejackets on board.

"They applied this provision with the most drastic remedy they could," Jackson said. "It's the ultimate decision. It's their death penalty, so to speak. I would argue to you that's the height of arbitrariness."

The high court should send the case back for a jury to decide, Jackson said, not let stand a lower-court ruling that he said doesn't pass the smell test.

The Citation's lawsuit to reclaim its winnings was dismissed after it was transferred to the county where the tournament is based, and after local Superior Court Judge John Nobles Jr. decided its merits without a jury. Only just before the hearing did the Citation's lawyers learn that Nobles was the former law partner and vacation buddy of the attorney representing the boat finishing second after Citation.

Claud Wheatly III and Nobles had taken several vacations together, including during the time the lawsuit had been under way, the Citation's lawyers said. Owners of the second-place Carnivore stand to divide $999,453 after taking the winner's share and part of the third-place money.

Wheatly noted to the high court that Citation's lawyers have no evidence that Nobles displayed any prejudice or bias in the case.

http://news.yahoo.com/fish-story-lan...093532675.html
 
Old January 8th, 2013 #14
Leonard Rouse
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Money, intrigue, and fish. Who says administrative and admiralty law aren't sexy?

Last edited by Leonard Rouse; January 8th, 2013 at 07:51 PM.
 
Old January 9th, 2013 #15
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I sold this photo on ebay a few years ago. Guess who?

 
Old January 9th, 2013 #16
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Here's an old one of author Zane Grey.

Note: Zane Grey once held eleven worlds records in deep sea fishing, all since broken, and his trophies were displayed at the Museum of Natural Science. He also owned patents on fishing lures. His records:

Bluefin Tuna, 758 Lbs. Nova Scotia, Canada 1924
Yellowfin Tuna, 318 Lbs. Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, 1924
Pacific Sailfish, 132 Lbs. Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, 1924
Pacific Sailfish, 135 Lbs. Zihuateneyo, Mexico, 1924
Yellowtail, 111Lbs. Bay of Islands, New Zealand, 1926
Broadbill Swordfish, 582 Lbs. Catalina Island, California, 1926
Pacific Dolphin, (Mahi Mahi), 53 Lbs. Vairao, Tahiti, 1930
Giant Tahitian Striped Marlin, (Pacific Blue Marlin), 1040 Lbs, Vairao, Tahiti, 1930
Pacific Sailfish, 170 Lbs. Vavau, Tonga Islands, 1931
Pacific Dolphin (Mahi Mahi), 64 Lbs. Vairao, Tahiti, 1933
Silver Marlin, 618 Lbs. Vairao, Tahiti, 1933
Silver Marlin, 710 Lbs. Vairao, Tahiti, 1933
Tiger Shark, 1036 Lbs. Sydney Australia, 1936
Marlin, 450 Lbs. Bora Bora, Tahiti

 
Old November 23rd, 2013 #17
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Default "pinocchio" fish caught the second time

The rare chimaera has a long nose, a terrifying toothy mouth and venomous spine making it a real life sea monster



A fishing crew got a shock when they pulled out this terrifying long-nosed fish - and it's only the second time one has been caught in the area.

After much speculation, experts have identified the toothy swimmer as the extremely rare long-nosed chimaera.

It was caught in the freezing arctic waters of Davis Strait in Northern Canada by the Nunavut fishing boat.

With a nose to rival Pinocchio's, a monstrous mouth and a venomous spine atop its gelatinous grey body, it looks quite the freak.

Researchers first believed the weird fish was the similarly freakish goblin shark - and looking at its mouth there are similarities.

But they say the long-nosed chimaera is rarely caught because it is likely to make its home at abysmal depths not often visited by humans.

University of Windsor researcher Nigel Hussey told the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation: "Potentially, if we fish deeper, maybe between 1,000 and 2,000 metres, we could find that's there's actually quite a lot of them there."

He added: "We just don’t know."

The deep sea chimaeras are actually distant relatives of sharks and rays.

The long-nosed species has a whip-like tail and can grow to around three feet long.

A photo of the Davis Straight specimen, thanks largely to its utter strangeness, has gone viral since it was posted online.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-n...#ixzz2lS23Y9QL
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Old January 15th, 2014 #18
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http://jezebel.com/teenage-dolphins-...iii-1491897937

dolphins chewing on puffer fish
 
Old January 16th, 2014 #19
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Mystery of Nevada lake where 100,00 fish died off in a single MONTH

- Fish at Sparks Marina near Reno, Nevada, died from lack of oxygen
- Biologists can't determine what is causing the loss of oxygen
- 100,000 trout, bass and catfish washed up dead on the shores of the lake

By ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTER
16 January 2014

State wildlife officials are trying to figure out why all the fish have died in a northern Nevada marina where the stocked fishery has flourished since the man-made lake was created nearly 15 years ago.

An estimated 100,000 trout, bass and catfish have died over the past month in the Sparks Marina along U.S. Interstate 80 east of Reno, apparently the result of a dramatic, unexplained drop in dissolved oxygen levels, Nevada Department of Wildlife spokesman Chris Healy said Wednesday.

Scientists say a bitter cold snap could have caused oxygen-poor waters to rise from the old rock quarry's bottom to the surface, but they don't understand what sparked the massive die-off.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz2qcNsbgPV
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Old January 17th, 2014 #20
Alex Linder
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Story about the Aral Sea, which the commies destroyed to try to create a cotton industry

http://www.vice.com/read/the-shrunke...sea-is-growing





The Aral Sea is actually a saltwater lake that once covered an area of 26,300 square miles between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Today, it is a shadow of its former self, having split into northern and southern halves in 1986. The sea first began to shrink in the 1960s when the Soviet Union decided to divert the rivers that feed into the sea to irrigate cotton fields further south. Cotton was one of the main economic industries in Soviet times, and Moscow’s planners clearly prioritized economic growth over any environmental concerns. The aftermath of this lack of foresight is that the Aral Sea remains one of the world’s worst ecological disasters, existing as a semi-apocalyptic wasteland of dust and lost opportunity.

As the water continued to recede, the sea eventually became so salinated that native freshwater fish were unable to survive. Most local industry was related to the water, and with the water and the fish gone, so too were the jobs. Many families from the surrounding villages left for other cities. For those who stayed, the years since have been hard. Not only have they faced economic hardship, but also a range of health issues stemming from pesticide and fertilizer residues left on the bottom of the sea and spread by the wind. Life in a rural area that is dependent upon the sea can be difficult anywhere in the world, but in one where the fish and water have nearly vanished, it's been a struggle to survive.

[private land ownership preserves the environment; government ownership destroys it]



















^This dude is in his thirties!

Last edited by Alex Linder; January 17th, 2014 at 07:49 PM.
 
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