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Old August 18th, 2010 #161
Hugh
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If you use the square foot gardening technique, which works with square trays divided into square feet, you can have close to 10 by 10 squares a foot wide each, or a hundred different types of plants, which you can plant at different times throughout the year, without much effort. Companion planting where different plants support each others growth, e.g maize and beans is also something to look into.

If you stack these trays in series above each other, you'll be able to double or triple the space available.

Grow things that don't need much sun on the bottom trays, and those that do on the tray above them

http://www.squarefootgardening.com/
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Old March 26th, 2011 #162
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh View Post
If you use the square foot gardening technique, which works with square trays divided into square feet, you can have close to 10 by 10 squares a foot wide each, or a hundred different types of plants, which you can plant at different times throughout the year, without much effort. Companion planting where different plants support each others growth, e.g maize and beans is also something to look into.

If you stack these trays in series above each other, you'll be able to double or triple the space available.

Grow things that don't need much sun on the bottom trays, and those that do on the tray above them

http://www.squarefootgardening.com/
I was going to mention the Square Foot gardening method.

Square_foot_gardening Square_foot_gardening

The inventor of this ran a PBS program for several years. You don't have to do things EXACTLY according to his plan--he recommends garden beds that are 4' x 4', with 36 inches of clearance between beds. Despite the intensive nature of the method, this seems rather wasteful of space for me so I am planning on doing three beds, 4' by 10', with the square-foot grids he suggests.
 
Old April 7th, 2011 #163
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I think this program is what is being used by the remaining Whites in Zimbabwe so they don't starve.
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Old March 10th, 2014 #164
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Default #1 My Garden Thread

All right, like Chevy Chase on Beverly D'Angelo, I'm really gonna go for it this year. I'm an animal!

Nah...but I have a little more room to play with this year, so I'm going to try some things. Started today by planting seeds in a mock-flat. Mock because it's actually a baking pan, but ssshhhh, don't tell the seeds. I'm hoping they won't care. The only stuff I have that needs pre-growing is two kinds of tomatoes and canteloupes. These are supposed to grown indoors for 4-8 weeks before the last frost. I live in zone 3, i think it is, which plants from april to june.

More later...just dug up some beautiful black soil (if only black 'people' were as useful as black loam, eh?) and loaded up the tray, jacked in the seeds, and gave them a taste of delicious droppy water. Placed them in front of a big light-admitting window. The rest is UP TO THEM. (And the sun god, Ra.)

Anyway, feel free to post whatever you're up to this year. I think we may already have a thread on this I will fold in here when I find it.

Last year I grew a bunch of spices, and really enjoyed that. Try that, if you want something simple. Buy little starter plants: sage, oregano, rosemary, etc. They will even last through the winter, some of them. I'm still waiting to see if mine made it. Have my doubts as it was exceptionally cold, but they're supposed to be able to survive to about -5. It did get to -15 three times, so may have to get new ones. But there's nothing nicer than grabbing a bunch of rosemary and stuffing it under the skin of the whole chicken you're cooking...good times.
 
Old May 8th, 2014 #165
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All right. My solar-powered, root-filtered, cloud-watered, soil-based, all-organical, experimental outdoors vegetational development center -- what I like to refer to as my 'garden' for short -- is ready for business.

I cleared a 5'x20' space this year. Am growing

- garlic
- onions
- green beans
- canteloupes/melons
- tomatoes (2 kinds, cherry and medium-sized)
- cucumber
- zucchini
- 3 kinds of squash (acorn is one i like)

All these are in and planted, seeds and seedlings, as I think about what I'm going to say on podcast, and check the sky, as my cloud-watering system kicks in.

Plan to plant herbs again too, I love these:

- oregano
- thyme
- rosemary
- sage

All fantastic on chicken, pork, beef and in all preparations, great in soups.

I'll stick in a photo or two as things come along.
 
Old May 8th, 2014 #167
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The cantaloupe, melons, and squash alone are going to consume that 5' x 20' spot, and then some if you have any winter squash. You'll need to keep the vines pruned to make it work.
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Old May 8th, 2014 #168
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Default Purdue U Garden Guides

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/garden_pubs.html

One item I recommend for anyone with any amount of growing space is Sun Chokes, also called Jerusalem Artichokes. They are a perennial and they multiply rapidly.

Plant them and they are there, ready to eat when you need them.

They can be invasive if you don't keep them thinned, so locate them accordingly.

Nutritional info; http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/2456/2
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Old May 8th, 2014 #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericthered View Post
The cantaloupe, melons, and squash alone are going to consume that 5' x 20' spot, and then some if you have any winter squash. You'll need to keep the vines pruned to make it work.
I'm going to have an all-green steel cage death match among vegs. I will be cheering for the less disgusting ones. You never know if all the seeds are good anyway. this is my first 'larger' attempt so i'm more seeing what works than anything. i know the tomatoes will work, and they're the main thing.
 
Old May 9th, 2014 #170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
I'm going to have an all-green steel cage death match among vegs. I will be cheering for the less disgusting ones. You never know if all the seeds are good anyway. this is my first 'larger' attempt so i'm more seeing what works than anything. i know the tomatoes will work, and they're the main thing.
They always are, Alex. They always are.
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Old May 27th, 2014 #171
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Put my first seeds in the ground on Memorial Day. Corn, Cukes, beans, peas, lettuce, radishes, tomatoes, turnips, I will pick up some squash and tomato plants but I am putting down Sevens pesticides this year and doing a heckuva lot more in terms of aggressive pest control than in years past. Glad to see you're doing some full-scale gardening, Alex.
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Old June 11th, 2014 #172
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Tomato, pepper, melon, squash, and zucchini plants in the ground.
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Old July 17th, 2014 #173
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Just ate the first solid results from my garden. Four green beans. I fried them in some poisonous hamburger grease for a couple minutes. They tasted good. Beans in a can are ok, but they lose their joie de vivre, their caged tears mingling with the water they're suffocated in. They grow as pale and glummerical as that Baldwin woman in
.

I'm trying this 30-day no-sugar way of eating, taken from a book Jimmy Marr sent me called "It Starts with Food." I started it July 1. Has not been easy. Have lost 10-12 pounds in just over half a month, although losing weight is not the (or my) purpose of doing this, but a by-product of this way of eating.

I will post some snips from this book. The authors advocate eating meat and vegetables...and a little fruit. And drinking water, and little else (black coffee is ok, I think).

I find the eating part not too hard to follow, but not drinking coke has proved extremely difficult. Avoiding pastries is pretty easy for me, since I never ate them much anyway. One does have a craving for something crunchy, after a few days. My personal problem is I really don't like or eat salads at all. Apart from that, I'm not picky.

Don't know if I'll stay on this after 30 days, but one good thing I have discovered is that I can eat sweet potatoes. They are supposed to be much more nutrient dense than white potatoes, which the authors are against.

The authors advocate eating:

- meat (organic is better because it lacks the poisoned fat found in factory-farmed animals; if you can't afford organic, then it's good idea to trim the fat)

- vegetables - best are (top 20): aparagus, beets, bell peppers, bok choy, broccoli/broccolini, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, greens (beet, collard, mustard, turnip), kale, lettuce (bibb, boston, butter, red), onions/shallots/leeks/garlic, rutabaga/turnip, spinach, sweet potato, swiss chard, tomato, watercress, winter squashes, zucchini/summer squash.

- (decidedly less important) fruit - best are: apricots, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, grapefruit, kiwi, melons, plums, strawberries, raspberries

So basically you're avoiding dairy, grains and sugars, except from fruit. Basically you just eat some protein with a couple cups of vegetables and drink water. You can get complex, and they have recipes, but it's pretty simple to follow. The authors claim that all these modern diseases that used to be infrequent or unheard of are the product of inflammation resulting from consumption of huge amounts of sugar. This is basically, as I take it, the same claim the late Atkins made, and pretty much the basis of the paleo school of eating. The science appears to be there to back their claims, from what I can tell. It fits our politics too, in that the same government we say and know lies about diversity lies about diet. The USDA/govt is the one that recommended people turn into herbivore grain grazers and demonized red meat. (The authors are big on fish and eggs, not just red meat.)

It Starts with Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways: Melissa Hartwig, Dallas Hartwig: 9781936608898: Amazon.com: Books It Starts with Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways: Melissa Hartwig, Dallas Hartwig: 9781936608898: Amazon.com: Books

[the authors are named Hartwig; I do not think they are jews. At one point they tell me what I (any reader) don't want to hear but need to hear, which is one way I judge the Germanicness of something (as opposed to the bullshit unserious glad-handy happy-happy judeo-cheerleaderism that is always a danger in anything peppy and self-helpy). The willingness to be blunt where needed (not obnoxious, that's just icing, but directness, calm-eyed direct-looking-at-you-ness) is necessary in these things - it is the only thing truly respectful of the reader.]

Last edited by Alex Linder; July 17th, 2014 at 07:52 PM.
 
Old July 18th, 2014 #174
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Good read.

Gotta love phaseolus vulgaris. Hope you used heirloom seeds, boss.

www.seedsavers.org
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Last edited by Donnie in Ohio; July 18th, 2014 at 04:09 AM.
 
Old July 18th, 2014 #175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
Just ate the first solid results from my garden. Four green beans. I fried them in some poisonous hamburger grease for a couple minutes. They tasted good. Beans in a can are ok, but they lose their joie de vivre, their caged tears mingling with the water they're suffocated in. They grow as pale and glummerical as that Baldwin woman in Last Dance with Mary Jane.

I'm trying this 30-day no-sugar way of eating, taken from a book Jimmy Marr sent me called "It Starts with Food." I started it July 1. Has not been easy. Have lost 10-12 pounds in just over half a month, although losing weight is not the (or my) purpose of doing this, but a by-product of this way of eating.

I will post some snips from this book. The authors advocate eating meat and vegetables...and a little fruit. And drinking water, and little else (black coffee is ok, I think).

I find the eating part not too hard to follow, but not drinking coke has proved extremely difficult. Avoiding pastries is pretty easy for me, since I never ate them much anyway. One does have a craving for something crunchy, after a few days. My personal problem is I really don't like or eat salads at all. Apart from that, I'm not picky.

Don't know if I'll stay on this after 30 days, but one good thing I have discovered is that I can eat sweet potatoes. They are supposed to be much more nutrient dense than white potatoes, which the authors are against.

The authors advocate eating:

- meat (organic is better because it lacks the poisoned fat found in factory-farmed animals; if you can't afford organic, then it's good idea to trim the fat)

- vegetables - best are (top 20): aparagus, beets, bell peppers, bok choy, broccoli/broccolini, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, greens (beet, collard, mustard, turnip), kale, lettuce (bibb, boston, butter, red), onions/shallots/leeks/garlic, rutabaga/turnip, spinach, sweet potato, swiss chard, tomato, watercress, winter squashes, zucchini/summer squash.

- (decidedly less important) fruit - best are: apricots, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, grapefruit, kiwi, melons, plums, strawberries, raspberries

So basically you're avoiding dairy, grains and sugars, except from fruit. Basically you just eat some protein with a couple cups of vegetables and drink water. You can get complex, and they have recipes, but it's pretty simple to follow. The authors claim that all these modern diseases that used to be infrequent or unheard of are the product of inflammation resulting from consumption of huge amounts of sugar. This is basically, as I take it, the same claim the late Atkins made, and pretty much the basis of the paleo school of eating. The science appears to be there to back their claims, from what I can tell. It fits our politics too, in that the same government we say and know lies about diversity lies about diet. The USDA/govt is the one that recommended people turn into herbivore grain grazers and demonized red meat. (The authors are big on fish and eggs, not just red meat.)

It Starts with Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways: Melissa Hartwig, Dallas Hartwig: 9781936608898: Amazon.com: Books

[the authors are named Hartwig; I do not think they are jews. At one point they tell me what I (any reader) don't want to hear but need to hear, which is one way I judge the Germanicness of something (as opposed to the bullshit unserious glad-handy happy-happy judeo-cheerleaderism that is always a danger in anything peppy and self-helpy). The willingness to be blunt where needed (not obnoxious, that's just icing, but directness, calm-eyed direct-looking-at-you-ness) is necessary in these things - it is the only thing truly respectful of the reader.]
This sounds similar to a low-inflammatory diet I follow on and off too. (Perricone diet based) it was conceived as a diet for better skin but when I tried it for a few days I was shocked how much better I felt and looked.

No processed foods, sugar (other than fructose or honey) and stick to low glycemic carbs. Lots and lots of oily fish such as red salmon, anchovies, sardines etc (for the omega 3's) and an emphasis on organic where possible. Dark leafy greens are to be included wherever possible in particular watercress which is one of the most nutrient dense vegetables full stop.

Basically a meal will consist of a meat, a vegetable and fruit. Lots of mineral water and/or green tea.

Carbs consist of sweet pots, barley, slow cooked oatmeal. Preferred fruits are canteloupe melons, blueberries, pears and and nectarines.

I workout a lot, a mix of weights and running and I find this too low carb to be healthy for that if I stuck rigidly to the prescribed amount which is basically a cup a day. I get grouchy from being glycogen depleted.
However, I still adhere to the guiding principles namely, lots of omega-3, dark leafy greens and fruit.
 
Old July 30th, 2014 #176
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Well, I lasted 12 days of the 30. But I learned some things - how to blanch vegetables, that I can eat sweet potatoes. I began to experience the effects of the way of eating. I will try it again, as I eat down my low stocks of bad carbs.

Last night had 22 fresh beans - blanched then sauteed. Once blanched (boiled in salty water for 2 minutes, then put in icewater, then eaten or refrigerated). Got the first ripe tomato. Finally. Roma.

Been an up and down year for the plot.

Most confusing/irritating is the vine plants (melons and squash) have grown and flowered but refuse to produce fruit. These are not heirloom seeds, I don't think, so I don't know if this means the seeds are sterile. So much ignorance...

Now I personally did not experience any orgasmic lifting of spirits due to not consuming sugar, but one could feel the loss of weight, shrinking of belly, that sort of thing. Ultimately, I think will try to moderate consumption, which is not easy to do. Say, drink one 2-liter of coke a week, and one bag of potato chips a month. And eat some taco shells. And have just a little sugar/milk in black coffee, which is rather bleak without it. And eat full butter, not just clarified.

Just try to keep on learning more stuff, more vegetables, more ways of preparing them, growing them. Like anything else... Hopefully we have a good deer season this year after last year's windy failure.

I didn't even know bush beans existed. I will post a picture eventually. I water the bush a lot, so it becomes a watering hole for tiny local fauna. Just now a wasp was embracing a piece of bud it had found or removed, and I think sucking water off it. Very strange. Yesterday I saw a large katydid under some leaves. I guess it eats them. Not the beans, the leaves. And a wolf running around under the leaves. Um...that would be wolf spider, not an actual wolf.

Read that 90% of the time the beans served in a sit-down restaurant are blanched.

But really, for any of you who want to lose weight, it's this simple:

- don't eat sugar.

In practice, that means: don't drink pop. Don't eat breads/grains/pastries. Do that, you'll lose weight.

Should also avoid corn and peanuts for other reason.

Last edited by Alex Linder; July 30th, 2014 at 12:02 PM.
 
Old August 1st, 2014 #177
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Learned something...from the internet. So...my squash are flowering but not fruiting. Why? Evidently, according to a page, because they're not being pollinated. Squash produce male and female flowers on the same plant. The females produce a bumpy little pre-fruit. Bees are supposed to come along, morning only, and get the fruit fertilized. From there, the fruit grows very quickly. But if the plant isn't fertilized, the flower dies and drops off. Same with the male flower, it doesn't last long. So today I tried to pollinate one flower that I thought was female. Most flowers are male, only about 1 in 4 or 5 are male, apparently. So, if you're not a bee, you take a paintbrush or Q-tip and play god. Hopefully it will work. We'll see.

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/a...es/squash.html

5. Q. Why won't my squash set fruit -- they bloom and the blooms fall off?

A. Squash have male and female blossoms on the same plant (monoecious). The male blossom is borne on a slender stalk. The female blossom has the swollen embryonic fruit attached at its base. The blossoms of both sexes are open and fertile only during the morning hours of one day. During this time pollen must be transferred by bees or by a person using an artists paint brush or Q-Tip, the female blossom will close without being fertilized, the squash will not enlarge and in a few days it will drop from the plant to the ground. The male blossom may open a second day, but the pollen will no longer be fertile and the blossom will close, wilt and drop from the plant that day or the next. There are many more male blossoms than female blossoms on a squash plant. There may be 3 to 4 male blossoms opening for several days to a week before the first female blossoms open.

new word: monoecious

moˇnoeˇcious [muh-nee-shuhs] Show IPA
adjective
1. Biology . having both male and female organs in the same individual; hermaphroditic.
2. Botany . (of a plant, species, etc.) having the stamens and the pistils in separate flowers on the same plant.

(Good word for insulting people, eh? sort of alt-hermaphrodite)

Back in the seventies, monoecious scrawnster Bowie sang beautiful music and appeared in strange films.

Last edited by Alex Linder; August 1st, 2014 at 12:27 PM.
 
Old August 4th, 2014 #178
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I believe...I did it. I successfully impregnated my squash. Which turned out to be a cucumber...I believe. The thing does grow incredibly quickly. Like overnight from nothing to a 4-5" cucumber.
 
Old August 11th, 2014 #179
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Unhappy Lots of 'maters but no artichokes

We had so much rain down here last summer that no one had many tomatoes. This year I planted seven tomato plants, several kinds, and they are all covered with tomatoes. I have been eating tomatoes all day with everything for weeks now. It looks as though I'll have tomatoes until Dec. like I did three years ago.

I love artichokes more than life itself but we can't grow them in this zone (Georgia) apparently. I called the county Extension Office and was told they don't grow here.

I was so disappointed.
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Old August 14th, 2014 #180
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Default Artichokes!

Okay, so I decided to go googling about growing artichokes down here in Georgia since the guy (who tends to be verrry conservative about these things) at the Extension Office said you can't grow artichokes in Georgia.

I found someone in my area who is trying to grow artichokes and she recommended a site called sweetheartartichokes.com for good information as well as ordering plants. I went there and there is a lot of good info.

It looks like I would need to go ahead and place an order now in case they run out next year due to a small crop. I think 2 plants are about $20.00 plus maybe shipping and handling.

So, I am going to try to grow artichokes next Spring. The woman said it is probably best to grow them in raised beds since we may get a lot of rain--you never know what the summer is going to be like down here. Last summer it rained for weeks on end without much sun.

This summer is kinda dry but not so hot. We've had some nice little coolish spells (we're having one now) with Fallish temps at night and dry sunny days. Although we are getting ready next week to enter the dog days of summer probably through the first or second week of September.

I love artichokes in everything from salads to soups to casseroles. They are just a delicious food. And it's just as enjoyable if not more to just steam them and make up a little dip with butter and mustard and eat the leaves and then the heart. Yum! Really, it may be my favorite food.
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