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Old July 26th, 2012 #1
Alex Linder
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Alex Linder
Default National Socialist Policy on Smoking and Tobacco

The Nazi anti-tobacco campaign included banning smoking in trams, buses and city trains,[6] promoting health education,[12] limiting cigarette rations in the Wehrmacht, organizing medical lectures for soldiers, and raising the tobacco tax.[6] The National Socialists also imposed restrictions on tobacco advertising and smoking in public spaces, and regulated restaurants and coffeehouses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-to...n_Nazi_Germany
 
Old July 26th, 2012 #2
cillian
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That all sounds familiar.
 
Old July 27th, 2012 #3
Crowe
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Alex, a lot of wikipedia articles are infused with unneeded Marxist drivel that isn't related to the facts. Many of them are half-truths, gross exaggerations and outright lies. I don't think wikipedia should be accepted as a legitimate source of information in the movement for those reasons.

Germans were aware of the smoking risks long before most in America caught on. I don't see anything wrong with making the public aware that tobacco is harmful, and limiting it on public property.

And there are plenty of other profitable crops for farmers to grow besides tobacco. In fact, many farmers I know of in my area no longer grow it because they changed the way the entire business works. They used to take their crop to the auction and sale what they grow. Now the companies buy allotments, example, they pay for a certain weight of tobacco, depending on the size of the allotment you grow. If you get a bad harvest you will be cut short, and forced to buy from others who possibly had better harvests to meet your contract.

If you want to eliminate tobacco, eliminate it at the source, provide farmers with an alternative crop to grow that can be just as profitable or more profitable. Supply of tobacco will die down, prices will skyrocket, and most will drop this unhealthy habit.

I used to be a 2 pack a day smoker for 8 years (started when I was 16), and I quit cold turkey after getting a respiratory infection, that lingered on for 2 months. And I haven't smoked a cigarette since then.
 
Old July 27th, 2012 #4
Steven L. Akins
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The discussion about tobacco here brought to mind an old movie I had watched some time ago that was made in 1950 entitled "Bright Leaf" which was sort of a Hollywood style glamorization of the history behind the American tobacco industry which focused on the early development of mass produced cigarettes.

As with all things in the American retail industry wherever there was money to be made, the Jews got in on the action, and while this movie doesn't touch on that itself, I thought it was interesting that one of the supporting actors, Jeff Corey (born Arthur Zwerling) was among the actors who were blacklisted in the 1950's by the House Committee on Un-American Activities for refusing to give names of alleged "Communists" and "subversives" in the entertainment industry and went so far as to ridicule the panel by offering critiques of the testimony of the previous witnesses.


Corey's face is familiar to anyone who has watched Hollywood westerns, he is notable for playing the hook-nosed, mustached sheriff in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, as well as numerous other cowboy/lawman type roles:



Among the other stars of the film was the Jewish actress, Lauren Bacall (born Betty Joan Perske) and Gary Cooper. In 1944, Cooper joined the anti-communist Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals. While filming Good Sam, he testified before the House Committee on Un-American Activities on October 23, 1947, characterized as a "friendly" witness. Asked if he had observed "communistic influence in Hollywood", Cooper named no one in particular but said he had "turned down quite a few scripts because I thought they were tinged with communistic ideas"; he also said he had heard statements such as "don't you think the Constitution of the United States is about 150 years out of date?" and "perhaps this would be a more efficient government without a Congress"— statements he characterized as "very un-American". He also told the committee the following:

Quote:
"Several years ago, when communism was more of a social chit-chatter in parties for offices, and so on when communism didn't have the implications that it has now, discussion of communism was more open and I remember hearing statements from some folks to the effect that the communistic system had a great many features that were desirable. It offered the actors and artists — in other words, the creative people — a special place in government where we would be somewhat immune from the ordinary leveling of income. And as I remember, some actor's name was mentioned to me who had a house in Moscow which was very large — he had three cars, and stuff, with his house being quite a bit larger than my house in Beverly Hills at the time — and it looked to me like a pretty phony come-on to us in the picture business. From that time on, I could never take any of this pinko mouthing very seriously, because I didn't feel it was on the level."
None of which is particularly on-topic to the discussion here, but I find it interesting that the Jewish Hollywood moguls of that era were interested in producing a film that basically glorified the tobacco and cigarette industry, which in no small way helped to contribute to the wealth and power of the Jewish elite in the 20th century.



 
Old July 27th, 2012 #5
Donald E. Pauly
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Smile Wise Saying from the Fuhrer

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
The Nazi anti-tobacco campaign included banning smoking in trams, buses and city trains,[6] promoting health education,[12] limiting cigarette rations in the Wehrmacht, organizing medical lectures for soldiers, and raising the tobacco tax.[6] The National Socialists also imposed restrictions on tobacco advertising and smoking in public spaces, and regulated restaurants and coffeehouses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-to...n_Nazi_Germany
The Fuhrer, of Blessed Memory, smoked tobacco in the trenches in France in WWI. He quit sometime during that war and became a campaigner against it. Smoking was forbidden in his conferences when he was in power. This tortured many of his officers who were addicted to tobacco. They had to wait for breaks to go outside to smoke.

German soldiers got free tobacco but were allowed large rations of chocolate in lieu of it. There were many government anti-smoking campaigns. Tobacco had to be imported from Turkey which caused the loss of foreign exchange.

Hitler had a saying:

Quote:
Tobacco is the Red Man's revenge on the White man for killing him with alcohol and firearms.-Adolf Hitler
The Mormons believe that tobacco is a useful medicine for sick cows and horses and I agree. I could never see the sense of ruining perfectly good tobacco by setting fire to it. Cowboys who chew tobacco put out a lot more forest fires than they start.

Last edited by Donald E. Pauly; July 27th, 2012 at 10:40 AM. Reason: typo
 
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