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Old August 4th, 2012 #1
Alex Linder
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Default (#1 Movies Thread) My favorite movies, Your Favorite Movies, Our Favorite Movies and Other Movies Discussion List Thread

These are movies I like. I'm going to add to this list over time. But only in this first post.

Halloween III: Season of the Witch (genuinely sinister bad guy, with Irish accent - very hard to pull off; genuine disgust at what halloween has gelded into - and the will and manufacturing ability to disgeld it - and this before it became fag-slut day! great lead, a doc who hits on every female he comes across, taps some sweet young pussy, and appears to have a personal diet that involves drinking the better part of a beer per hour; imo, much better movie than any other halloween, altho it should not have been called halloween because it has nothing to do with the original)

Charlie Varrick (just a great movie about unexpected problems ensuing from a bank heist; great character interaction, shows you any situation can be handled, and since the catholic hayes production code (?) is over, the 'bad' guy can get away with it)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978) (much better than the original, despite majority critic view. genuinely creepy, scary, and concerns the eternal problem of separating appearance from reality - and getting other people to believe you - also jew Niemoy perfectly portrays a kike feigning benevolence to hide anti-human agenda)

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (personal nostalgia for good health childhood endless sports-playing fun-n-sun in pre-mexicant 70s california, plus real characters with almost no 'diversity')

Back to School (best set pieces ever - Kinison as history prof and real-world guy jew Dangerfield mocking superWASP widget econ prof for cluelessness)

Kingpin (just flat funny. murray is perfectly obnoxious, cheers guy does his best work)

The Wicker Man (1973) - creepy, scary, fascinating, and with the most beautiful ending imaginable. oh yeah, and prime britt ekland tittage than which it really dont get no better.

SLC Punk - only movie I know about/filmed in Salt Lake City. Matters to me since I lived there in high school, but Salt Lake really is an unusual and interesting city. Movie made by a New Jersey guy, an Italian. Lots of good scenes around the city, just makes me feel nostalgic to see them. Good story too, with a couple good set pieces. Really like lead actor Matthew Lillard.

Bad Santa - just a great movie. Parts are too long, the pacing is not great, but there are some legitimately extremely funny parts in this movie, and that's all you can ask. Great acting job by Billy Bob Thorton. This movie is hated by people who are perfect counterindicators Ol' Suckpoop Joe Farah, and other slobbering retards with backward-running digestive tracts - praisers of retard fare like Napoleon Dynamite. Great work by the late John Ritter too, as a spineless middle-management type. Hell, even the niggers do a good job in this movie.

Last edited by Alex Linder; November 24th, 2012 at 04:52 AM.
 
Old August 4th, 2012 #2
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This battle scene is fantastisk.
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Old August 4th, 2012 #3
N.B. Forrest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Linder View Post
These are movies I like. I'm going to add to this list over time. But only in this first post.

Halloween III: Season of the Witch

Charlie Varrick

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)
Great flick. Matthau's highly-intelligent, meticulously careful bank robber Varrick was outstanding, as were John Vernon as the anti-jew banker and Joe Don Baker as the polite Southern assassin:

"I allow very few men to speak to me in that tone. Few caucasians. And no nigras at all."

Last edited by N.B. Forrest; August 4th, 2012 at 08:58 PM.
 
Old August 4th, 2012 #4
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You still need to see Drive. Ignoring the race mixing stuff it's pretty good on its portrayal of jews.

> http://kosherslaughter.com/

Last edited by varg; August 5th, 2012 at 01:03 AM. Reason: .
 
Old August 4th, 2012 #5
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Full metal jacket, from me and the Mr.

 
Old August 4th, 2012 #6
Alex Linder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.B. Forrest View Post
Great flick. Matthau's highly-intelligent, meticulously careful bank robber Varrick was outstanding, as were John Vernon as the anti-jew banker and Joe Don Baker as the polite Southern assassin:

"I allow very few men to speak to me in that tone. Few caucasians. And no nigras at all."
Yeah, it has some great stuff. I love when the hothead is all "you don't have the balls of a bull canary! I'm eating beefsteak 3x a day!" Probably missed that a little, but something like that.

Back then, as I've said many times, they employed real people as actors. Now all the people they use look like actors. If you see what I mean. Even the bit roles look like movie stars. No one's old. No one's gray. No one has bad teeth. No one has bad thoughts. If they're unPC, it's in the usual jejune PC stereotyping way.
 
Old August 4th, 2012 #7
Steven L. Akins
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A clip from one of my favorite films:

 
Old August 4th, 2012 #8
N.B. Forrest
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Quote:
Yeah, it has some great stuff. I love when the hothead is all "you don't have the balls of a bull canary! I'm eating beefsteak 3x a day!" Probably missed that a little, but something like that.
Haha, yeah, that character actor was terrific playing mouthy little shits: he also played the sniper in Dirty Harry. Plus, he looked like a combination of one of my crazy cousins & Angus Young....

Quote:
Back then, as I've said many times, they employed real people as actors. Now all the people they use look like actors. If you see what I mean. Even the bit roles look like movie stars. No one's old. No one's gray. No one has bad teeth. No one has bad thoughts. If they're unPC, it's in the usual jejune PC stereotyping way.
The '70s were a sort of golden age of the movies, especially with regard to character actors. Strother Martin, Warren Oates, G.D. Spradlin, and ugly, unforgettable mugs like these guys:

Charles Tyner



Ed Lauter



Al Lettieri



John Cazale


Last edited by N.B. Forrest; August 4th, 2012 at 11:18 PM.
 
Old August 4th, 2012 #9
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Hard Times: Charles Bronson, James Coburn & Strother Martin in a yarn about a bare-knuckles boxer in the Depression South.

Mr. Majestyk: Bronson again as a melon farmer tangling with a menacing Lettieri.

The Getaway: Steve McQueen and Ali McGraw as bank robbers running for the border with Lettieri hot on their trail.

The Cincinnati Kid: McQueen as an upstart poker whiz taking on "the man" Lancey Howard (brilliantly played by old Edward G. Robinson)
 
Old August 4th, 2012 #10
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The Brinks Job: Hilarious "dramedy" about the real-life '50s robbery of a Brinks depository in Massachusetts. Peter Falk, Warren Oates, et al.

The Friends of Eddie Coyle: Robert Mitchum & huge-headed Peter Boyle in a story about a tired crook pressured to become a fed informant to avoid spending his old age in the joint.
 
Old August 5th, 2012 #11
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Castle Keep.

A pretty strange flick, but lot's of star power and plenty of sub-plots.

I loved the young Bruce Dern bible thumping character and his group of deserters.
Lancaster says come with us to the castle, the Germans will shoot you, you'll make lousy prisoners.

What was the soldiers name who fell in love with the Volkswagen?

The whole thing seemed kinda Vonnegut-esque to me.
 
Old August 5th, 2012 #12
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Found this movie at salvation army called "Deadly Drifter" and played it for a bunch of younger roommates who were getting thoroughly stoned.

Never saw so much squinting, wincing, and furrowing of brows. "what?.... what?" lol the movie tends to have that effect even without weed's help. Used a few times with different groups, pretty consistent results. I think someone in the house figured out I was playing it to watch them as they were watching it, because it walked off I was laughing too much during the show.

Or, someone liked it that much lol there was one who seemed to think it was pretty deep stuff. His girlfriend said he made her watch it with him again hahah

Just recently found out that "Tommy the Traveler" was a real character.
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Old August 5th, 2012 #13
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Alien: Probably the best horror film ever made. Ridley Scott's best work.
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Old August 5th, 2012 #14
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Not exactly my favorite movie, but close - The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

Yes, I know, David Bowie is a queer - not relevant. The damn movie was just freaking stunningly weird and riveting. I don't know if it was to be taken sort of literally or as an allegory. It was well done and consistent. You must make a serious effort to pay attention, or it will seem almost random.

There is a funny bit of movie trivia about The Man Who Fell to Earth, and I managed to catch it on first viewing. There is a second alien wandering around Earth and hints that the second alien isn't from the same planet as the alien portrayed by Bowie. You won't catch it, few, very few do, but I did.

Very dry, very dismal film. In my mind's eye it is a black and white movie, Film Noir, but it was filmed in color.

Mike
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Old August 5th, 2012 #15
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http://matthewpickle.wordpress.com/2...e-in-the-west/

Once Upon a Time in the West is a film created by Sergio Leone and is considered one of the best films of the western genre. It is a story that begins with a hazy story and never really declares outright whom the villain is and who the hero is until its climatic shootout near the conclusion of the film. Although the film is nearly three hours in length and is known for its slow pace like similar Sergio Leone films, Once Upon a Time in the West is a suspenseful film that incorporates excellent sound and cinematic techniques and differs from other westerns by challenging the dominant ideology.

Because they are both westerns, I thought Once Upon a Time in the West was going to have a similar feel to our previous film lab where we viewed The Searchers. This was clearly not the case because Once Upon a Time in the West has numerous differences to The Searchers. The differences I noticed was the pace of the film. The Searches seemed to move relatively fast (covering 5 years in just under 2 hours), while each scene in Once Upon a Time in the West seems to drag on forever. Another difference I noticed was the music each film used in creating the film. The Searchers used happy, patriotic music when John Wayne and the gang were on screen. Once Upon a Time in the West used only eerie music adding to the suspense of the film. The last major difference I noticed between The Searchers and Once Upon a Time in the West is the use of the established shot and the close-up shot. It seemed The Searches emphasized the western landscape and generally used wide, open shots. Although Once Upon a Time in the West emphasizes the western landscape as well, I noticed more shots focusing on the character’s faces, allowing the viewer to see their emotion clearly.

The differences in Once Upon a Time in the West compared to the ‘normal’ western film is one of the ways this film challenges the dominant ideology. Before watching this film I determined the dominant ideology of western films is a simple story, which generally consists of a good, moral person (usually an American cowboy) fighting against the ‘bad guys’ (usually bandits or Native American tribes). Once Upon a Time in the West challenges this ideology by having a storyline where there is no clear hero and clear villain until the film develops. According to Roger Ebert, “we’re given a plot complex enough for Antonioni, involving killers, land rights, railroads, long-delayed revenge, mistaken identity, love triangles, double-crosses and shoot-outs. We’re well into the second hour of the movie before the plot becomes quite clear.” Additionally, the actors are casted into roles they previously never had. Robert Ebert states that Sergio Leone “produces some interesting performances by casting against type. Henry Fonda is the bad guy for once in his career; Charles Bronson is impressively inscrutable as the mysterious good guy; and Jason Robards is a tough guy, believe it or not” By having a complex storyline and different casting roles, Sergio Leone challenges the belief that the west was a simple, good vs. evil fight, but rather a place where there is corruption and mystery.

Once Upon a Time in the West also displays excellent sound and camera techniques. Roger Ebert states Once Upon a Time in the West is similar to other Sergio Leone’s films. He states “there’s the same eerie music; the same sweaty, ugly faces; the same rhythm of waiting and violence.” I noticed the excellent use of sound while watching Once Upon a Time in the West. The opening scene is a perfect example of this, where it seems every little noise is emphasized. No one is talking and all the viewer can hear is water dripping, some sort of squeaking noise, and a fly buzzing. Not only does the focus on sound create suspense for the viewer, it also creates certain smoothness to the story. In a couple scenes, the sound from the end of one scene turns into the sound of the next scene. For example, when Frank’s gun fires when he is about to kill the little boy, the gunshot echo transitions into a train moving. This type of transition emphasizes smoothness in certain scenes.

Once Upon a Time in the West is an extremely suspenseful film. One of the ways Sergio Leone captures this suspense is through the point of view shot. In numerous occasions throughout the film the audience sees an actor look in a direction off screen with a surprise look. This causes suspense because the viewer does not know what the character is looking at. This cinematic technique used with the sound techniques previously mentioned, helps Once Upon a Time in the West become a very suspenseful film that challenges the dominant ideology.


 
Old August 5th, 2012 #16
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http://frothygirlz.com/2009/07/27/me...ations-brazil/
Brazil: I can’t remember a movie that has made me both laugh and cry—and spooked me, and made me feel romantic, and many other things. And Brazil does that.

Terry Gilliam’s Brazil doesn’t have much of a plot—in a dystopian world, government drone Jonathan Pryce has recurring dreams of a beautiful woman, meets said woman in real life, gets her, loses her, and then…well, some other stuff involving Robert DeNiro as a renegade fixer, a giant samurai, and Michael Palin wearing the creepiest mask in Christendom and beyond happens.

The meat of Brazil, Terry Gilliam’s 1985 masterpiece, is in the moments—first and foremost are the visuals, which are Gilliam’s greatest strength as a director. Everything from lead Jonathan Pryce’s dreams, to his office, to the medical center, to the Ministry (and who could forget the car?) are rendered with a parental love, and their details provide some of the best jokes. Say what you will about Gilliam’s desultory stories, the man never cheats on his backgrounds and effects.

Brazil (1985, Terry Gilliam) has a brazen originality. It’s not so much based on as inspired by 1984 (one of the working titles was 19841⁄2) , but nowhere near as serious, which is probably good for Gilliam because he’s not a very serious man. But that’s not to say it’s a comedy either. Though it sort of is. It’s a com-rom-dram.
 
Old August 5th, 2012 #17
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Ok what we're going for here are your favorite movies. I'm just looking for SOMETHING i haven't seen. I've seen all NBF's and most of the others. Have not seen "Deadly Drifter" at least that I can remember, or The Man Who Fell to Earth, will try that. I like movies, but I've seen all the good ones, it seems, and the new stuff almost uniformly is of no interest, as I'm adult and not interested in kiddie comic book-themed movies.
 
Old August 5th, 2012 #18
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I reemmber liking Charlie Varrick. he was a crook, but you kinda rooted for him. THE GETAWAY was a film in the same period, with Steve mcQueen and Ali McGraw, and a lot of character actors. Again, you were on mcQueen's side.

Films I like the most, a quick list:
1. The Thing (1950) I enjoy the ensemble acting, and how its a study of people uniting in the face of a crisis. Really good lines and characters.

2. Bread and Chocolate: An Italian seventie's movie about an Italian immigrant trying to stay in Switzerland. Not as one-sided on immigrants as you think, and I think it sums up the whole immigration issue in Europe.

3. The Sand Pebbles: Steve McQueen as a sailor on a warship in 1920's China. It was said to be a Vietnam analogy, but a really strong study of character and the futility of trying to play god in another country. Just great action.

4. Northwest Passage (1940): Spencer Tracy leads Roger's Rangers againt the Indians. It's another action film, but also a study of leadership and men in brutal survival.

5. Panic in the Streets (1950) Richard Widmark as a Naval doctor trying to stop an outbreak of plague in New Orleans. Again, a good character, rough, tough streets, and the locations in New Orleans are gritty and stay with you, and, yes, it's all white. Directed by Elia Kazan.

6. Moonrise Kingdom: Just came out, a quirky, funny story about two kids who run away from home on an island, and deals with Boy Scouts, Benjamin Britten, and a lot of sedate humor about growing up and being adult.

I do see movies, but I'm turned off by the comic book films. Also, comedies these days are stupid and about drugs and useless teenagers. TV actually has better writing.
 
Old August 5th, 2012 #20
John in Woodbridge
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If I had to pick one favorite film...

The Bedford Incident (1965)



A maverick US Destroyer Captain (Richard Widmark) chases a Russian sub during the cold war.

Make sure to watch the film without break from start to finish because you don't want to lose the pace. Ending is mindblowing. Probably the only film that starred Sidney Portier where race is not an issue.
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