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Old October 18th, 2012 #81
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Old October 20th, 2012 #82
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Swedish government body funding book on Israeli ‘apartheid’ October 12, 2012


(JTA) -- The Swedish Arts Council is sponsoring and distributing a new book which presents Israel as a racist entity comparable to apartheid South Africa.
The council, a government body, has allocated $8,985 toward publishing and distributing "The bride is beautiful but she is married to another man – Zionism -- an ideology at the end of the road?”, the council told JTA this week. The decision was made last month.
The book by Ingmar Karlsson, a retired senior Swedish diplomat, states: “The fundamental difference between South African and Zionist colonialism is the former wanted land and people while the latter only wanted land.”


http://www.jta.org/news/article/2012...aeli-apartheid


http://users.ox.ac.uk/~ssfc0005/The%20Iron%20Wall.html


http://palitsmine.wordpress.com/2012...o-another-man/




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Netanyahu to Obama - "You are the Great Satan and we are the little Satan"






Benjamin Netanyahu Schools Obama






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U.S. & Israeli Officials: Iran is NOT Building Nuclear Weapons.


The White House, the Pentagon, U.S. intelligence, and reportedly even Israeli intelligence and leaders of the Israeli military, as well as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) all have reached the same conclusions about Iran's nuclear program:


1) Iran does not have a nuclear weapon - it only has a civilian nuclear program at this point
2) Iran is not building a nuclear weapon
3) Iran has not made the decision of whether or not to build a nuclear weapon in the future


"Reuters put it another way: "The United States, European allies and even Israel generally agree on three things about Iran's nuclear program: Tehran does not have a bomb, has not decided to build one, and is probably years away from having a deliverable nuclear warhead." ….


http://fcnl.org/issues/iran/us_israe...clear_weapons/




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Attack on Iran - Is War Imminent? - The History of Netanyahu's Propaganda


http://xrepublic.tv/node/598


Netanyahu is clinically paranoid ….. bordering on insanity! … How can Israelis elect such a man?




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How misinformation obscures the Israel lobby’s influence on U.S. foreign policy.


http://thepassionateattachment.com/2...oreign-policy/




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The Truth About Israel by a Jew – Miko Peled


http://sabbah.biz/mt/archives/2012/1...ew-miko-peled/




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An Industry of Fear - The Arab you fear


…. in Israel there exists an entire industry of fear – in politics, in the financial sector and in the media. The prime minister flew all the way to New York with and a red magic marker to make people fear Iran. In order for military technology companies such as Rafael and Israel Aerospace Industries to be profitable, it is crucial that you fear war, and to justify the Prawer Plan for the expropriation of Bedouin lands, it is crucial that you fear Bedouins. ...


http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7...293372,00.html




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US Jews cancel talks with Protestants over Israel


… Arguing that US military aid to Israel was "sustaining the conflict and undermining the long-term security interests of both Israelis and Palestinians," church leaders said Congress should investigate whether Israel has violated the human rights standards set by the Foreign Assistance Act and the Arms Export Control Act. ...


http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7...294213,00.html




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Ashrawi calls on diplomats to protect olive harvest


… dispatch observer teams to Palestinian olive groves in order to discourage attacks by settlers …


http://www.jpost.com/NationalNews/Ar...aspx?id=287829




Settler violence is terrorism. Even America’s State Department says so. Hypocrisy is saying one thing and doing another.


http://theintelhub.com/2012/10/16/is...tler-violence/






Last February, a Jerusalem Fund/Palestine Center (PC) report titled “When Settlers Attack” discussed data collected from 2004 to 2011. It includes over 3,700 separate incidents. It explains when, how, and why they occur.
PC discovered a disturbing increase in violence. Palestinian civilians are targeted. Northern rural West Bank villages are most affected. ….


http://theintelhub.com/2012/08/30/se...-palestinians/




“When Settlers attack”: http://www.thejerusalemfund.org/ht/a...Action/i/32678


http://sabbah.biz/mt/archives/2012/1...wish-settlers/




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As long as enough people can be frightened, then all people can be ruled. That is how it works in a democratic system and mass fear becomes the ticket to destroy rights across the board. - James Bovard




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Old October 23rd, 2012 #83
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Old October 27th, 2012 #84
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Old October 29th, 2012 #85
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Jew Yawk Kike Proposes Resolution That Calls For Arrest of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Rep. Steve Israel of New York, the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, introduced legislation to the House last week that calls for Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to be arrested for incitement to genocide.

The symbolic resolution notes that Ahmadinejad has called for Israel to “be wiped off the map” [That's B.S. he said no such thing, and it's been proven so] and referred to Israelis as “bloodthirsty barbarians” and “fabricated people.” The Iranian president has also questioned whether Jews were actually killed in Nazi extermination camps.

The legislation accuses Ahmadinejad of violating United Nation’s Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, which makes incitement to commit genocide a punishable act.

Raw Story (http://s.tt/1rjCN)
 
Old October 29th, 2012 #86
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If I was president Ahmadinejad at this time, I would make an announcement that Iran would build a replica of one of the twin WTC towers and fly a remote controlled jet into it. Just the announcement alone would create world wide repercussions.
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Old November 7th, 2012 #87
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Default Iran Secret War: Cyber Attacks* And Airstrikes Show Shifting Tactics

By Peter Apps, Political Risk Correspondent

quote


WASHINGTON, Nov 6 (Reuters) - From a suspected Israeli airstrike in Sudan to cyber warfare in the Gulf and a drone shot down over Israel, the largely hidden war between Iran and its foes seems heating up and spreading.



Despite months of speculation, most experts and governments believe the risk of a direct Israeli strike on Tehran's nuclear program stirring regional conflict has eased, at least for now. But all sides, it seems, are finding other ways to fight.



For the US and European powers , the main focus remains on oil export sanctions that are inflicting ever more damage on Iran's economy.



But the Obama administration and Israel have also ploughed resources into covert operations - a campaign that now appears to have prompted an increasingly sophisticated Iranian reaction.



With Iranian hackers suspected of severely damaging Saudi oil facility computers* ( ed: tjb) and a suspected Hezbollah drone shot down over Israel, tactics and tools once seen as the sole purview of the United States are now clearly being used on both sides.



The mounting body count in Syria, some believe, is also in part a consequence of the proxy war being waged there.



"In many ways, it's reminiscent of the Cold War, particularly the proxy conflicts," says Hayat Alvi, lecturer in Middle Eastern politics at the US Naval War College. "But unlike in the Cold War, there are now a much larger number of asymmetrical warfare techniques. Most of this is happening behind the scenes, but in the modern world we are finding it difficult to keep them secret for that long."



Covert confrontation itself is, of course, nothing new. Foreign intelligence agencies have battled for decades to stop Iran and other states obtaining nuclear material, while Tehran and Israel have long needled each other and proxy battlegrounds, particularly in Lebanon and the Palestinian territories.



The U.S. and Israel are widely suspected of using the Stuxnet computer worm to target Iranian nuclear centrifuges. Meanwhile, most experts believe Israel's Mossad was involved in assassinations of several nuclear scientists - attacks suspected to have prompted similar bomb attacks on Israeli diplomats in India, Georgia and Thailand and tourists in Bulgaria.



But it does seem to be escalating. What Tehran is trying to do now, most analysts believe, is in part further retaliation. But its rulers may also be indicating that the Islamic Republic now has a range of new and potentially damaging options in reserve should its nuclear facilities be bombed.



SIGNALLING THROUGH COVERT ACTION?



The penetration of Israeli airspace by an unmanned drone apparently operated by Lebanese militant group Hezbollah - a long-term Iranian ally - was, perhaps, one of the clearest examples so far. The drone was shot down by Israel's military in the vicinity of its main nuclear facility at Dimona.



Iran has long been believed to be putting resources into a drone programme and may have gathered useful tips after a classified U.S. Sentinal stealth drone came down in the country last year. While the Hezbollah drone was unarmed, a attack with multiple drones laden with explosives might prove harder to stop.



The dramatic spike in suspected Iranian cyber attacks this year also has some in the U.S. distinctly worried. While direct denial of service attacks on U.S. banks - widely seen as retaliation for US sanctions and attempts to freeze Iran from the international financial system - were seen relatively simplistic, attacks on US allies in the Gulf were more complex.



The most worrying, experts say, were those on Saudi oil firm Aramco and Qatari gas export facilities. Last month, US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta described the Saudi attack as the most sophisticated yet launched on a private company, effectively destroying tens of thousands of computers - although he stopped short of blaming Tehran directly.



Iranian officials have tended to deny involvement. But they say they have continued to come under cyber attack themselves with systems at Iran's own oil facilities, communications and infrastructure firms suffering problems last month.



"The problem is that these are secret forms of warfare that are rarely, if ever, discussed publicly," a veteran former CIA official and now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute told an event last month. "And yet the implications could be colossal. What do we do, for example, if it turns out the Iranians can shut down the entire Saudi oil production."



In the absence of direct face-to-face negotiations, such actions can also be a diplomatic tool in their own right.



"The cyber attacks and Hezbollah drone both represent an escalation from the Iranian camp," says Ariel Ratner, a former Obama administration political appointees at the State Department and now fellow for the Truman National Security Foundation. "But a lot of what is going on here is a matter of signalling to each other."



That might also in part explain a suspected Israeli airstrike on the outskirts of the Sudanese capital Khartoum on October 23 that caused a major fire at Sudan's Yarmouk arms factory.



"Israel is flexing its muscles militarily and also sending a message to Tehran and Washington that it will not hesitate to use force to defend itself," says Bilal Saab, director of the Institute for near East and Gulf Military Analysis based in the United Arab Emirates and Washington DC. "It was a show of force meant to send political messages and achieve precise and immediate military objectives, those being the prevention of Iranian shipment of sensitive hardware to its proxies."



PROXY BATTLES



Israel refused to comment after Sudanese officials said four of its aircraft conducted the attack. U.S. officials would not comment on what they believed happened, but spy agencies have long suspected Iran of smuggling weaponry into Eritrea and Sudan and across Egypt to Hamas militants in Gaza.



Last week's four-day visit to Sudan by two Iranian warships - coming mere days after the arms factory attack - appeared an unusually public show of solidarity between two nations. Some suspect Israel is also raising its support for South Sudan, which gained its independence last year and has since teetered on the brink of conflict with Khartoum.



The much more significant proxy confrontations, however, remain in the region itself. Israel is taking something of a back foot in the conflict in Syria - its officials saying any support they might give for anti-Assad rebels would be counter-productive - but Iran's Arab rivals are not.



For Washington, rolling back Tehran's influence in Syria is seen as a distinctly secondary goal to stopping - or at least limiting - the bloodshed.



For Saudi Arabia and Qatar, however, arming the rebels, the prospect of replacing the Shi'ite Alawite rule of Bashar al-Assad with a Sunni majority government with no Iranian links is seen as a key motivation.



The war there is already seen destabilising neighbouring Lebanon, while the body count in Iraq has also been creeping back up as violence between Sunni groups and sometimes Tehran-backed Shi'ites simmers.



The Sunni leadership of almost all of the Gulf states have long suspected Iran of stirring up dissent amongst their Shi'ite populations, although Western diplomats suspect such claims are overstated. Some worry Washington is already being dragged onto one side in a growing regional blood feud.



Tehran may step up its attempts to destabilise neighbours, particularly if it believes its enemies are trying to do the same. Washington recently removed Iranian militant opposition group MEK from its list of terrorist groups, potentially opening the door to covert co-operation. To work with it on attacks within the country, however, might produce a violent response.



Last year, U.S. officials said they had foiled an Iranian plot to kill the Saudi ambassador to Washington by bombing a restaurant in Washington DC. That, some security experts said, suggested Iran was increasingly willing to take serious risks - although others said the entire tale sounded too far-fetched.



"It's very easy to look at these events and tie them together in some kind of straightforward narrative," says Henry Smith, Middle East analyst for London-based consultancy Control Risks. "But in reality, things are likely to be far more complex." (Reporting By Peter Apps

www.reuters.com
 
Old November 9th, 2012 #88
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jewsign Ehud Barak

quote

JERUSALEM -- Israel's defense minister said Iran has slowed the timetable for enriching enough uranium to build nuclear weapons, implying that Israel would have more time to decide whether to strike Iran's enrichment facilities.

Ehud Barak's assertion that Iran has "essentially delayed their arrival at the red line by eight months," is in line with the timeframe laid out by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in September, when he spoke at the U.N. General Assembly. There, Netanyahu said the world has until next summer at the latest to stop Iran before it can build a nuclear bomb.

The West suspects Iran may be aiming toward production of nuclear weapons and has imposed a series of sanctions on the regime.

U.S. lawmakers are currently working on a set of new sanctions that could prevent Iran from doing business with most of the world until it agrees to internationally demanded constraints on its nuclear program.

Iran denies it is trying to build a bomb, insisting its program is for peaceful purposes. However, it has restricted access of U.N. inspectors to the country's nuclear sites.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/1...n_2101427.html
 
Old November 10th, 2012 #89
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Default Violation of Iran airspace, act of provocation by US: Analyst

Quote:
A political analyst has described the recent violation of Iran’s airspace by a US drone as an “act of provocation” and against the international law, Press TV reports.

“It is fairly obvious that it is another act of provocation that sends the wrong signal from Washington and I think that their own message is that the US continues to violate the airspace of Iran contrary to the international norms and rule of international law,” Kaveh Afrasiabi said in an interview with Press TV on Saturday.
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2012/11...e-provocation/
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Old November 10th, 2012 #90
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What is this bs that the jews are always saying "Israel MUST reserve the right to defend itself." Who is saying that they are not allowed to defend themselves? It's just another PR ploy to position themselves as "poor little Israel. We don't do anything unless the US allows us to. Will you please allow us to defend ourselves more?" Hahahah what a lie.
 
Old January 7th, 2013 #91
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U.S. pursues Iranophobia in Latin America: Iranian official


English.news.cn 2013-01-07 00:10:47


TEHRAN, Jan. 6 (Xinhua) -- An Iranian official said that the United States whips up Iranophobia scenario in Latin America, Press TV reported on Sunday.

Deputy Chairman of the Iranian Armed Forces' Chiefs of Staff, Brigadier General Massoud Jazayeri, made the remarks referring to a recent U.S. law that aims at countering Tehran's alleged influence in Latin America.

On Dec. 28, 2012, U.S. President Barack Obama enacted a law which would address Iran's growing presence and activity in Latin America through a political strategy to be developed by the State Department.

"Because of its imperialist nature, Washington has interpreted the enthusiasm of the Latin American countries to expand relations with Iran and the increasing number of Iranian embassies in the region as a threat to the United States," the Iranian commander was quoted as saying.

Since 2005, Iran has enhanced its political and economic ties with Latin American states and has opened six more embassies in the region, bringing the total to 11.

Jazayeri reiterated that in line with a "scenario of Iranophobia," Western and Israeli intelligence and political sources were engaged in inciting Latin American countries against the Islamic republic, alleging that Iran plans to use them as a pad to sneak into the United States.

On Jan. 2012, the Iranian state television officially launched an international channel in Spanish called "Hispan TV" to consolidate the cultural bonds, and to introduce Iran's traditions through airing programs for Hispanic addressees round the clock.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/wo..._132084434.htm
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Old January 14th, 2013 #92
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Obama and the Criminal Collective Punishment of the Iranian People

John Glaser, January 14, 2013

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Article 33 of the Fourth Geneva Convention: “No general penalty, pecuniary or otherwise, shall be inflicted upon the population on account of the acts of individuals for which they can not be regarded as jointly and severally responsible.”


The Guardian reports that “Hundreds of thousands of Iranians with serious illnesses have been put at imminent risk by the unintended consequences of international sanctions, which have led to dire shortages of life-saving medicines such as chemotherapy drugs for cancer and bloodclotting agents for haemophiliacs.”

The key word there is “unintended.” The problem with describing it this way is that it isn’t accurate. Washington understands the consequences of the sanctions, and the same Guardian report acknowledges that the Obama administration has been made aware that hundreds of thousands of sick people in Iran have had their access to medicine restricted because of the sanctions. And they haven’t done anything about it.

“The west lies when it says it hasn’t imposed sanctions on our medical sector. Many medical firms have sanctioned us,” Naser Naghdi, the director general of Iran’s biggest pharmaceutical company, told the Guardian.

But sanctions aren’t just blocking much needed medical supplies; unemployment is rising and inflation is spiraling out of control. “Prices of fruit and sugar, among other staples, have soared – in some cases showing threefold and fourfold increases,” Saeed Kamali Dehghan wrote in the Guardian last summer. “The price of meat, an essential ingredient of Iranian food, has gone up to such an extent that many now eat it only on special occasions.”

“What is most concerning,” according to Trita Parsi, president of the National Iranian American Council, “is that it is now increasingly clear that the people are the target.” Parsi added that “in a non-democracy, such as Iran, the ability for people to pressure their government is limited,” and that “Many in Washington acknowledge that we are conducting economic warfare. That means the entire Iranian economy is the battlefield – and ordinary Iranians are [seen as] enemy combatants.”

Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta has admitted sanctions aren’t demonstrably changing the policies of the regime, but has insisted on their continuance nevertheless. As one of the top congressional supporters of sanctions, Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA), said, “Critics [of the sanctions] argued that these measures will hurt the Iranian people. Quite frankly, we need to do just that.” Or take Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-NY): “The goal … is to inflict crippling, unendurable economic pain over there. Iran’s banking sector — especially its central bank — needs to become the financial equivalent of Chernobyl: radioactive, dangerous and most of all, empty.”

One of the major atrocities of all of post-WWII US foreign policy was the American-led sanctions on Iraq, which ended up killing hundreds of thousands of Iraqis. We heard the same odious rationales for the sanctions on Iraq as we are now hearing for the sanctions on Iran. Denis Halliday, UN Humanitarian Coordinator in Baghdad, insisted the effect of the Iraq sanctions “fit the definition of genocide.”

We may be seeing this repeat in Iran. And for what? It can’t be punishment for a rogue nuclear weapons program: the US intelligence community has concluded it doesn’t exist. Whether the reason behind the sanctions are to placate Israeli security concerns or to block Iran’s regional influence, what matters is that this economic warfare is criminal; it violates the Fourth Geneva Convention.

But apparently President Obama – Nobel Peace Prize winner – doesn’t care about legally binding international treaties and conventional laws. Instead, he is busy implementing the collective punishment of Iranians for a crime they haven’t committed.


http://antiwar.com/blog/2013/01/14/o...ranian-people/
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Old February 15th, 2013 #93
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Welcome to the Malware-Industrial Complex

The U.S. government is developing new computer weapons and driving a black market in “zero-day” bugs. The result could be a more dangerous Web for everyone.

By Tom Simonite on February 13, 2013

Why It Matters

Governments, contractors, and researchers are developing cyber-weapons that could put businesses and ordinary Internet users at risk.

Every summer, computer security experts get together in Las Vegas for Black Hat and DEFCON, conferences that have earned notoriety for presentations demonstrating critical security holes discovered in widely used software. But while the conferences continue to draw big crowds, regular attendees say the bugs unveiled haven’t been quite so dramatic in recent years.

One reason is that a freshly discovered weakness in a popular piece of software, known in the trade as a “zero-day” vulnerability because the software makers have had no time to develop a fix, can be cashed in for much more than a reputation boost and some free drinks at the bar. Information about such flaws can command prices in the hundreds of thousands of dollars from defense contractors, security agencies and governments.

This trade in zero-day exploits is poorly documented, but it is perhaps the most visible part of a new industry that in the years to come is likely to swallow growing portions of the U.S. national defense budget, reshape international relations, and perhaps make the Web less safe for everyone.

Zero-day exploits are valuable because they can be used to sneak software onto a computer system without detection by conventional computer security measures, such as antivirus packages or firewalls. Criminals might do that to intercept credit card numbers. An intelligence agency or military force might steal diplomatic communications or even shut down a power plant.

It became clear that this type of assault would define a new era in warfare in 2010, when security researchers discovered a piece of malicious software, or malware, known as Stuxnet. Now widely believed to have been a project of U.S. and Israeli intelligence (U.S. officials have yet to publicly acknowledge a role but have done so anonymously to the New York Times and NPR), Stuxnet was carefully designed to infect multiple systems needed to access and control industrial equipment used in Iran’s nuclear program. The payload was clearly the work of a group with access to government-scale resources and intelligence, but it was made possible by four zero-day exploits for Windows that allowed it to silently infect target computers. That so many precious zero-days were used at once was just one of Stuxnet’s many striking features.

Since then, more Stuxnet-like malware has been uncovered, and it’s involved even more complex techniques (see “The Antivirus Era Is Over”). It is likely that even more have been deployed but escaped public notice. Meanwhile, governments and companies in the United States and around the world have begun paying more and more for the exploits needed to make such weapons work, says Christopher Soghoian, a principal technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union.

“On the one hand the government is freaking out about cyber-security, and on the other the U.S. is participating in a global market in vulnerabilities and pushing up the prices,” says Soghoian, who says he has spoken with people involved in the trade and that prices range from the thousands to the hundreds of thousands. Even civilian law-enforcement agencies pay for zero-days, Soghoian says, in order to sneak spy software onto suspects’ computers or mobile phones.

Exploits for mobile operating systems are particularly valued, says Soghoian, because unlike desktop computers, mobile systems are rarely updated. Apple sends updates to iPhone software a few times a year, meaning that a given flaw could be exploited for a long time. Sometimes the discoverer of a zero-day vulnerability receives a monthly payment as long as a flaw remains undiscovered. “As long as Apple or Microsoft has not fixed it you get paid,” says Soghioan.

No law directly regulates the sale of zero-days in the United States or elsewhere, so some traders pursue it quite openly. A Bangkok, Thailand-based security researcher who goes by the name “the Grugq” has spoken to the press about negotiating deals worth hundreds of thousands of dollars with government buyers from the United States and western Europe. In a discussion on Twitter last month, in which he was called an “arms dealer,” he tweeted that “exploits are not weapons,” and said that “an exploit is a component of a toolchain … the team that produces & maintains the toolchain is the weapon.”

The Grugq contacted MIT Technology Review to state that he has made no “public statement about exploit sales since the Forbes article.”

Some small companies are similarly up-front about their involvement in the trade. The French security company VUPEN states on its website that it “provides government-grade exploits specifically designed for the Intelligence community and national security agencies to help them achieve their offensive cyber security and lawful intercept missions.” Last year, employees of the company publicly demonstrated a zero-day flaw that compromised Google’s Chrome browser, but they turned down Google’s offer of a $60,000 reward if they would share how it worked. What happened to the exploit is unknown.

No U.S. government agency has gone on the record as saying that it buys zero-days. But U.S. defense agencies and companies have begun to publicly acknowledge that they intend to launch as well as defend against cyberattacks, a stance that will require new ways to penetrate enemy computers.

General Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and commander of the U.S. Cyber Command, told a symposium in Washington last October that the United States is prepared to do more than just block computer attacks. “Part of our defense has to consider offensive measures,” he said, making him one of the most senior officials to admit that the government will make use of malware. Earlier in 2012 the U.S. Air Force invited proposals for developing “Cyberspace Warfare Attack capabilities” that could “destroy, deny, degrade, disrupt, deceive, corrupt, or usurp the adversaries [sic] ability to use the cyberspace domain for his advantage.” And in November, Regina Dugan, the head of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, delivered another clear signal about the direction U.S. defense technology is heading. “In the coming years we will focus an increasing portion of our cyber research on the investigation of offensive capabilities to address military-specific needs,” she said, announcing that the agency expected to expand cyber-security research from 8 percent of its budget to 12 percent.

Defense analysts say one reason for the shift is that talking about offense introduces an element of deterrence, an established strategy for nuclear and conventional conflicts. Up to now, U.S. politicians and defense chiefs have talked mostly about the country’s vulnerability to digital attacks. Last fall, for example, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned frankly that U.S. infrastructure was being targeted by overseas attackers and that a “digital Pearl Harbor” could result (see “U.S. Power Grids, Water Plants a Hacking Target”).

Major defense contractors are less forthcoming about their role in making software to attack enemies of the U.S. government, but they are evidently rushing to embrace the opportunity. “It’s a growing area of the defense business at the same time that the rest of the defense business is shrinking,” says Peter Singer, director of the 21st Century Defense Initiative at the Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank. “They’ve identified two growth areas: drones and cyber.”

Large contractors are hiring many people with computer security skills, and some job openings make it clear there are opportunities to play more than just defense. Last year, Northrop Grumman posted ads seeking people to “plan, execute and assess an Offensive Cyberspace Operation (OCO) mission,” and many current positions at Northrop ask for “hands-on experience of offensive cyber operations.” Raytheon prefaces its ads for security-related jobs with language designed to appeal to stereotypical computer hackers: “Surfboards, pirate flags, and DEFCON black badges decorate our offices, and our Nerf collection dwarfs that of most toy stores. Our research and development projects cover the spectrum of offensive and defensive security technologies.”

The new focus of America’s military and defense contractors may concern some taxpayers. As more public dollars are spent researching new ways to attack computer systems, some of that money will go to people like The Grugq to discover fresh zero-day vulnerabilities. And an escalating cycle of competition between U.S and overseas government agencies and contractors could make the world more dangerous for computer users everywhere.

“Every country makes weapons: unfortunately, cyberspace is like that too,” says Sujeet Shenoi, who leads the U.S.-government-sponsored Cyber Corps Program at the University of Tulsa. His program trains students for government jobs defending against attacks, but he fears that defense contractors, also eager to recruit these students, are pushing the idea of offense too hard. Developing powerful malware introduces the dangerous temptation to use it, says Shenoi, who fears the consequences of active strikes against infrastructure. “I think maybe the civilian courts ought to get together and bar these kinds of attacks,” he says.

The ease with which perpetrators of a computer attack can hide their tracks also raises the risk that such weapons will be used, Shenoi points out. Worse, even if an attack using malware is unsuccessful, there’s a strong chance that a copy will remain somewhere on the victim’s system—by accident or design—or accidentally find its way onto computer systems not targeted at all, as Stuxnet did. Some security firms have already identified criminal malware that uses methods first seen in Stuxnet (see “Stuxnet Tricks Copied by Criminals”).

“The parallel is dropping the atomic bomb but also leaflets with the design of it,” says Singer. He estimates that around 100 countries already have cyber-war units of some kind, and around 20 have formidable capabilities: “There’s a lot of people playing this game.”

Updated 2.13.2013 to include a response from The Grugq.
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Old March 9th, 2013 #94
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Iran: UN human rights rapporteur took US bribes

Associated Press – Fri, Mar 8, 2013.

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — An Iranian official has accused the U.N. special rapporteur for human rights in Iran of taking bribes from the United States, the semi-official ISNA news agency reported Friday.

The report quoted Mohammad Javad Larijani, secretary general of Iran's high council for human rights, as saying Ahmed Shaheed received money from the U.S. He said that was why he could only parrot U.S. allegations against Iran.

"The money the special rapporteur has received from the U.S. State Department has led to a situation that he cannot write about anything except their anti-Iran desires," Larijani was quoted as saying, without giving evidence.

Iran has barred Shaheed from Iran since 2011, saying there is no need for a special rapporteur because Iran has always answered questions from the U.N. Human Rights Council.

Larijani said Iran has provided U.N. with considerable evidence of violations by Shaheed, the Geneva-based U.N. Human Rights Council's special rapporteur on Iran. He did not provide details.

He said Shaheed behaves like a TV celebrity, appearing on western television stations to make comments against Iran.

"The special rapporteur has no right to take a stance against the country he is assigned to," Larijani said, charging that in TV interviews, Shaheed "repeats the words of the U.S. and Israel" against Iran.

Shaheed has produced four reports on alleged violations of human rights in Iran. Iran denies the charges.

http://news.yahoo.com/iran-un-human-...085439159.html
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Old March 20th, 2013 #95
littlefieldjohn
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Default Surgeons struggle in Iran as sanctions squeeze drug supplies

Surgeons struggle in Iran as sanctions squeeze drug supplies


Doctors and pharmacists warn operating theatres will close as medics turn to "old drugs" to make up shortfall in vital supplies
Saeed Kamali Dehghan, Guardian, Monday 18 March 2013 16.17 EDT
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013...anctions-drugs

Operating theatres in Iran are running out of anaesthetics due to a shortage of medicine caused by the unintended consequences of international sanctions.

Iranian doctors and pharmacists have warned that hospitals across the country are facing difficulties finding the drugs used during life-saving surgery.

"Drugs such as Atracurium, Isoflurane and Sevoflurane are either not available in the market or are very scarce," said Kheirollah Gholami, a leading pharmacist from Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

"If these drugs are not supplied, our operating theatres will have to close," he said, according to quotes carried by the semi-official Ilna news agency. "You can't just use a hammer to make patients become unconscious... If you don't have anaesthetics, patients in need of operations may simply die."

Gholami's warning has been echoed by many of his colleagues and medical officials, including Mohammad-Mehdi Ghiyamat, who is the head of the Iranian society of anaesthesiology and critical care. "In the wake of [the Persian new year] Nowruz holidays, only patients in emergencies can be transferred to operating theatres and we don't know what to do with the others," Shafaonline, a medical news website, quoted Ghiyamat as saying.
[...]
In his latest report on the situation of human rights in Iran, UN special rapporteur Ahmed Shaheed expressed concerns about "the potentially negative humanitarian effect of general economic sanctions" and called on the countries behind the punitive measures to make sure that "humanitarian exemptions are effectively serving their intended purpose".

Marietje Schaake, an MEP, called on the EU last month to reconsider sanctions so that Iran's ability to undertake life-saving operations is secured. "Crippling sanctions are only justifiable if they target the Iranian regime and not the civilian population," she wrote to the EU's high representative Catherine Ashton. "The EU should stand with the Iranian population, instead of making their lives even harder
 
Old March 30th, 2013 #96
Steve Lillywhite
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jewsign The only reason the U.S. is even talking about war with Iran is Israel

.

The only reason the U.S. is even talking about war with Iran is Israel.

The only reason the U.S. is even talking about war with Iran is Israel.

The only reason the U.S. is even talking about war with Iran is Israel.


.
 
Old March 30th, 2013 #97
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I think we'd be very shocked how much of the hatred of Iran is spurred by bible brainwashing. a lot of top people in the military are religious zealots who think Iran is Gog and Russia is Magog, Bush, Condaleeza Rice, all these top people are religious bible crazies who think Israelis are god's angels.

I remember John Hagee had two US generals on his show, saying how they believed all that goofy shit, about Iran being prophecied in the bible.


These people have authority to launch nuclear missiles fer fuck sakes.

The Jews are the religious maniacs, not Muslims. They have rabbis in their military doing all kinds of blood sacrifices to put witchcraft spells on Muslims and shit.
 
Old April 11th, 2013 #98
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Default 'Kwa Intel Chief Says Iran Isn't Building Nukes -- Is Anybody Listening?

Quote:
Wide Asleep In America


In testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday March 12, 2013, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper reaffirmed what the U.S. intelligence community has been saying for years: Iran has no nuclear weapons program, is not building a nuclear weapon and has not even made a decision to do so.

The annual “Worldwide Threat Assessment,” which compiles the collective conclusions of all American intelligence agencies, has long held that Iran maintains defensive capabilities and has a military doctrine of deterrence and retaliation, but is not an aggressive state actor and has no intention of beginning a conflict, let alone triggering a nuclear apocalypse.

While the U.S. intelligence community assumes that Iran already has the technical capability to produce nuclear weapons, “should a decision be made to do so,” Clapper’s report states (as it has for years now), “We do not know if Iran will eventually decide to build nuclear weapons.”

Were this decision ever to be made, Iran wouldn’t even be able to secretly start building a nuclear bomb. “[W]e assess Iran could not divert safeguarded material and produce a weapon-worth of WGU [weapons-grade uranium] before this activity is discovered,” Clapper told Congress.

Even Clapper, who is no stranger to alarmism, acknowledges that “Iran prefers to avoid direct confrontation with the United States” and would only act defensively “in response to perceived offenses.” Iran’s “decision making is guided by a cost-benefit approach” based on considerations of “security, prestige and influence, as well as the international political and security environment,” Clapper said, thereby dismissing allegations that the Islamic Republic is an irrational martyr state.

Furthermore, speaking at a national security conference in Herzliya on Thursday, Israel’s own military intelligence chief Aviv Kochavi concurred with Clapper’s assessment. While sure to continue advancing its nuclear program in the coming year, he said, Iran has not actually decided to build a bomb.

Such findings are wholly consistent with past assessments.http://www.dia.mil/public-affairs/te...009-03-10.html

In April 2010, Defense Intelligence Agency director Ronald Burgess told the Senate Committee on Armed Services, “Iran’s military strategy is designed to defend against external threats, particularly from the United States and Israel” and “to slow an invasion and force a diplomatic solution to hostilities.” The following year, he explained that “Iran is unlikely to initiate or intentionally provoke a conflict or launch a preemptive attack,” and reiterated this conclusion in early 2012.

With these findings in mind – assessed and reaffirmed as they are year after year – it is alarming indeed that journalists, pundits, establishment think tank analysts, and a wide array of government officials continue to parrot the claim that Iran is “the world’s most dangerous state” and “one of the gravest threats to international security.”

Such hysteria and fear-mongering, as always, is simply not borne out by the facts.http://www.wideasleepinamerica.com/2...ne-things.html
http://www.wideasleepinamerica.com/2...ing-nukes.html
 
Old April 17th, 2013 #99
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jewsign Gantz Claims Zionist Entity Can Invade Iran

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The Israeli military chief claimed the Zionist entity can invade the Islamic Republic of Iran on its own.

Chief of Staff Lt. Gen Benny Gantz made the remarks in an interview on public radio in East al-Quds(Jerusalem) on Tuesday, AFP reported.
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Old April 17th, 2013 #100
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Well, go ahead and let them spend some of their own money and shoot some of their own rounds and shed some of their own blood for a change.

If Israel wants to fight Iran, let 'em fight Iran and let everybody else stay out of it.
 
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