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Old January 29th, 2008 #1
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Default Americas

Craig Cobb did an excellent job posting these videos. It is amazing that even back during the Stone Age the Aryan's technology was cutting edge and out paced the muds.

Euros Are First Americans - Part 1
Euros Are First Americans- Part 2
Euros Are First Americans- Part 3
 
Old February 2nd, 2008 #2
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Default Re: Europeans Are The First Americans

Those are awesome, informative videos. I hope everyone takes time to check them out - it is well worth it! Thank you for posting them.
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Old February 12th, 2008 #3
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are they anywhere else they no longer work
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Blood, Honor, Conviction & Principle.
 
Old February 13th, 2008 #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holly View Post
are they anywhere else they no longer work
Fuckin' jewtube, but in the words of one British whigger I was recently debating "the jews don't own or control youtube, it is entirely a Gentile created and run enterprise."
 
Old February 13th, 2008 #5
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First Americans May Have Been European

By Bjorn Carey, LiveScience Staff Writer
posted: 19 February 2006 08:16 pm ET

Examples of Clovis and other Paleoindian point forms.
Markers of archaeological cultures in the Northeastern
part of North America.


ST. LOUIS—The first humans to spread across North America may have been seal hunters from France and Spain. This runs counter to the long-held belief that the first human entry into the Americas was a crossing of a land-ice bridge that spanned the Bering Strait about 13,500 years ago.
The new thinking was outlined here Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

The tools don’t match
Recent studies have suggested that the glaciers that helped form the bridge connecting Siberia and Alaska began receding around 17,000 to 13,000 years ago, leaving very little chance that people walked from one continent to the other.
Also, when archaeologist Dennis Stanford of the Smithsonian Institution places American spearheads, called Clovis points, side-by-side with Siberian points, he sees a divergence of many characteristics.
Instead, Stanford said today, Clovis points match up much closer with Solutrean style tools, which researchers date to about 19,000 years ago. This suggests that the American people making Clovis points made Solutrean points before that.
There’s just one problem with this hypothesis—Solutrean toolmakers lived in France and Spain. Scientists know of no land-ice bridge that spanned that entire gap.

The lost hunting party
Stanford has an idea for how humans crossed the Atlantic, though—boats. Art from that era indicates that Solutrean populations in northern Spain were hunting marine animals, such as seals, walrus, and tuna.
They may have even made their way into the floating ice chunks that unite immense harp seal populations in Canada and Europe each year. Four million seals, Stanford said, would look like a pretty good meal to hungry European hunters, who might have ventured into the ice flows much the same way that the Inuit in Alaska and Greenland do today.
Inuit use large, open hunting boats constructed from animal skins for longer trips or big hunts. These boats, called umiaq, can hold a dozen adults, as well as several children, dead seals or walruses, and even dog-sled teams. Inuit have been building these boats for thousands of years, and Stanford believes that Solutrean people may have used a similar design.
It’s possible that some groups of these hunters ventured out as far as Iceland, where they may have gotten caught up in the prevailing currents and were carried to North America.
“You get three boats loaded up like this and you would have a viable population,” Stanford said. “You could actually get a whole bunch of people washing up on Nova Scotia.”
Some scientists believe that the Solutrean peoples were responsible for much of the cave art in Europe. Opponents of Stanford’s work ask why, then, would these people stop producing art once they made it to North America?
“I don’t know,” Stanford said. “But you’re looking at a long distance inland, 100 miles or so, before they would get to caves to do art in.”
 
Old February 17th, 2008 #6
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Default Whites Came to America First

Nevada - Spirit Cave and Lovelock Mummies


Kennewick Man


Buhl Cave Woman



Penon Woman III - 13,000 yr. old Caucasoid in Mexico



Summary - First Americans - Out of Europe


http://first-americans.blogspot.com/


Videos
 
Old March 25th, 2008 #7
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[2007 - possibly Euro remains from 11,000 years ago, in Malibu]

The real-life Indiana Jones and the Mansion of Doom

Chris Ayres in Point Dume, Malibu

If Gary Stickel cuts a familiar figure with his wide-brimmed hat, dirty bomber jacket and mud-slathered boots, it is for good reason. His blend of erudition, shyness, dry humour and egotism were the inspiration for Indiana Jones, played by Harrison Ford in Raiders of the Lost Ark— down to Jones’s inability to spell “Neolithic”.

The real-life archaeologist hasn’t enjoyed the success of his celluloid alter ego, who earned $1.2 billion (£615 million) at the box office. At 62, Dr Stickel lives alone, is divorced, estranged from his daughter, and recovering from gout. “As far as archaeologists go, I think I’ve actually got a good personality,” he jokes.

Now he is about to initiate a blockbuster clash with some of Hollywood’s most redoubtable figures: the residents of Malibu. It’s exactly what you would expect of Indiana Jones — fighting to preserve an 11,000-year-old archaeological site on Point Dume, off the Pacific Coast Highway, which he says could hold the DNA answer to whether the first human beings in America were Asian or European.

Dr Stickel says it is the first site of its kind discovered on the 20,000 mile coastline from Alaska to Chile, but Malibu has no law to protect such sites. And the owner of the land is building a Mediterranean-style villa on her clifftop, valued at about $4 million. Dr Dennis Stanford of the Smithsonian Institution says the land is “nationally significant” and must be investigated.

“What’s happening here is barbaric,” says Dr Stickel, standing outside the barricades around the site. “Our history is important. And if it’s not important to her [the landowner], it’s important to many Americans, and other people.”

The owner is not a celebrity, but The Times has agreed not to publish the site’s location because of the risk of looting.

Dr Stickel’s struggle — Indiana Jones and the Mansion of Doom, as Hollywood might put it — began six years ago when the lot was bought for development. Under Malibu’s building code all sites must be surveyed for historical artefacts.

In 2005 Edgar Perez, a Native American, was helping to monitor the work, sifting through the dirt. “I was over there by that tree,” says Dr Stickel, “and Edgar starts yelling at me, ‘You’ve gotta see this’. He was holding up this thing, this speartip, and I said, ‘Oh my God’.”

The speartip was found to be up to 11,000 years old and distinctive “fluted flakes” on its base suggested that it belonged to the Clovis culture, named for the New Mexico site where the first such artefact was discovered in 1932. The culture is the subject of intense debate between archaeologists and Native Americans. Dr Stanford argues that because no speartips — known as Clovis Points — have been found in Siberia, from where the first Americans were supposed to have arrived, they must have come from the East Coast, via ice sheets linked with Europe, where there is a trail of Clovis discoveries. “They were from Iberia, not Siberia,” he once said of these settlers, who arrived 15,000 years before Columbus.

Native Americans are outraged at the idea that they might be related to those who infected them with smallpox and stole their land. Dr Stickel argues that any human remains could put an end to this debate with DNA evidence.

The owner of the land said: “I have followed all of the guide-lines, I have worked to preserve the integrity of the site, I have spent the money to comply (estimated at $100,000). Now I want to move into my house.”

Parts of the house have been built to allow future excavation, but Dr Stickel said that only 1 per cent of the settlement had been investigated.

He plans a press conference in Los Angeles, in the unlikely hope that public pressure will force something to happen. “This little thing here,” he says, holding up a relic of the Clovis speartip. “It’s my heaven, and her hell.”

* Have your say

Ever since President Clinton had the Army Corps of Engineers bury the Kennewick Man site in Washington State under 150 thousand tonnes of rock and gravel to obliterate all archaelogical evidence there has been an undeclared war against digs that would suggest Europeans were the original Native Americans. I fear that this does not bode well for the real life Indy.

Sam, Salt Lake City,

Just more proof that the 'first nations' label can only be applied to the unknown link from ape to man. 'Unknown' being the key word,
for if we ever do find 'the first nation', many bureaucrats and the recipients of tax funded 'guilt money' will have to go look for a real job.

Mel , Royston, BC

Dr. Stickel, if you need help call me.
Since the Sandia Mts. in the 70's, I've been really tired of the "I've got the money so what's your problem" people building their houses anywhere they want despite the cost to society, culture and the USA in general. Isn't that kind of tunnel vision with no regard for history or the future dangerous? I can't seem to work thru reality to a place where I can sympathize with the home owner, but I wish I could. It would make living with the disposable generation less painful.

Terre Knoll, Pittsburg, Kansas

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle1362158.ece
 
Old March 26th, 2008 #8
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[It is no exaggeration to say that a subspecies of sand flea would get more protection from ZOG than whatever lies in the ground at this Malibu site.]

Malibu Archaeological Find Is a Point of Contention

• Artifact Could Have Impact on North American Migration Theory While Roiling Local Waters

BY ANNE SOBLE

Malibu celebrity status can take many forms, but one of the more unusual recipients of local attention is a spearhead, or projectile point, that could have been used by hunters in the Clovis cultural era around 11,000 years ago to pursue a giant mammoth or buffalo in the vicinity of what is now Point Dume.

The so-called Clovis point even has its own media-savvy spokesperson, an archaeologist who consulted for the “Indiana Jones” film trilogy named Gary Stickel, who says the artifact is “a major discovery of national and international significance.” He also contends that the private property where the point was found, which has been designated Farpoint on the state archaeology rolls, should be the subject of additional research.

The point was found in September 2005 by Edgar Perez, a cultural resources specialist for the Tongva Tribe in Los Angeles, who was hired as the Native American monitor at a Point Dume residential construction site. Stickel said Perez was overseeing backhoe digging and spotted the spearhead in the bucket before it was crushed.

Dr. Stickel says that the crew’s elation at the find was not shared by the owner of the property, whose identity and address are not being disclosed to protect privacy as well as prevent vandalism of the site. He says the owner has questioned the authenticity of the artifact and prevents research from continuing at the site.

The archaeologist also contends that City of Malibu planning personnel have declined to cooperate with facilitating additional work at the location. He asserts that the city may have tried to block a press conference that Stickel scheduled last week on the grounds of the Page Museum with its backdrop of the La Brea Tar Pits, where examples of the animals that Clovis hunters stalked can be now seen.

Stickel says that a staffer at the museum told him that “the City of Malibu phoned,” then de*clined to elaborate further.

Malibu Surfside News calls to the municipal planning department for comment on Stickel’s assertions of what he calls “city censorship” were not returned.

Stickel says the purpose of the press conference was “to make the public aware of what we found and garner public support for more research.” He and colleagues stress the importance of the spearhead, the first example of Clovis culture found this far west, hence the site being named Farpoint. The significance of the discovery is reiterated in numerous communications from arch*ae*ol*ogists and anthropologists at universities and museums.

The point itself has been auth*enticated by Dr. Dennis Stanford, the director of the Paleo*in*dian/ Paleoecology Program at the Smithsonian Institution, who writes that he examined the point and “there is no question that the artifact was made using Clovis tech*nology and thereby indicates that the site was occupied by Clovis people over 11,000 years ago.”

Stanford adds, “The discovery of a Clovis age occupation at the site is extremely important not only for the local archaeological record, but for understanding the earliest pre-history of the Americas. Hence the site is of national significance and requires an interdisciplinary research program and protection.”

The point and other site data are now housed at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.

Stickel says the residence on the property has been completed, stressing he “never tried to stop it,” but he is now concerned that trenches dug for sprinkler systems have impacted the grounds.

The archaeologist says, “There are eight No Trespassing signs” on the two-plus-acre property, “some probably there for my benefit.” Still, he said he is pleased that the property has ex*tensive surveillance equipment, because otherwise “crazies might come out and try to vandalize the site.”

Interestingly, some descendants of the post-Clovis Chumash, traditionally considered Malibu’s earl*iest residents, are wary of Clov*is findings. Their oral histories may vary but, in some form, they subscribe to the prevailing coastal migration route theory that the first “Americans” were Asians who crossed the Bering Strait from Siberia.

Dennis Stanford, however, has put forth the thesis, which Stickel thinks the Clovis finds support, that the earliest mi*grants came across the Atlantic from southwestern Eur*ope on ice packs that bound all of the land masses closer together some 21,000 to 16,000 years ago.

This is not just ivory tower quibbling, but highly-charged debate that is closely interwoven with ethnic politics and beliefs. The Clovis point is not some esoteric curio, but a potential confirmation of who initially populated North America after the Ice Age.
The question of who got here first not only has tremendous im*plications for history, but also for the professional careers of individuals who ally themselves with one theory or another. That is assuming one is willing to discount any possibility that both migratory patterns could have taken place si*mul*taneously.

Stickel stresses that the “Farpoint Site may well yield more data critically important to our understanding of how the New World was first inhabited by the earliest people. Any portion of the site may contain a Clovis human tooth, and DNA analysis of it would help scientists to identify the human genetic origins of the New World.

“There’s a fantastic panorama of human occupation here and we need to understand it.”
He contends that “cultural resources should be treated like some mineral rights and granted special status. We need to find ways to facilitate obtaining this material so it is available for the common good.”

Stickel says that because of his em*phasis on the importance of accumulating this data, he has clashed with City of Malibu personnel who he says are more concerned with expediting Malibu private property development than adding to the knowledge of who were the community’s earliest residents.

Last November, one of the many scholars interested in the Farpoint Site sent a letter to then Mayor Ken Kearsley, in which he urged the city to “allow Stickel and his associates to put in a minimally intrusive, time-limited, final observation pit close to the house for the purposes of completing their mitigation work.

“I predict that the owner and other responsible citizens of Malibu will look back and be very proud to have done so.”


CAPTION 1

PRESS CONFERENCE—Archaeologist Gary Stickel points out excavated areas on the Point Dume property where the Clovis projectile point, or spearhead, was found. The location has been formally designated by the State of California as the Farpoint Site. The second map marked with red lines represents what Dr. Stickel calls “destroyed site areas.” He is critical of the City of Malibu, asserting that planning personnel “are very negative” about archaeological research in the community and may “have tried to stifle the press conference” that he and colleagues held last week outside the Page Museum, home of the La Brea Tar Pits. MSN Photos/Frank Lamonea

CAPTION 2.
FIND—Edgar Perez, the Na*tive American monitor at the Point Dume residential construction site, retrieved the Clovis point from a backhoe bucket during excavation of a trench on Sept. 25, 2005. Everyone quickly gathered around him because there was a sense that the discovery was important, and this photograph was taken to commemorate the event. The site archaeologist asserts that the owner has tried to impede continued research at the location and has even ac*cused him of “seeding” or placing the point at the site.

CAPTION 3.
DIVERGENCE—Two competing theories of migration are at stake as more information is derived from artifacts such as the Clovis point. One theory is that the Clovis people immigrated from Asia over the Bering Strait; the other is they were people from southwestern Europe who crossed a differently configured Atlantic Ocean 16,000 years ago or more.

CAPTION 4.
SCALE—Ray Corbett, the Anth*ropology Collection Manager at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, holds the actual Clovis point, which is also shown on this week’s cover. Replicas have been made for research and educational use.

http://www.malibusurfsidenews.com/st...070510001.html
 
Old March 26th, 2008 #9
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Here is Dr. Stickel's blog on Farpoint. You might want to leave him an encouraging comment, ask a question or two.

http://sundagger-egs.blogspot.com/20...ating-and.html
 
Old March 26th, 2008 #10
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Old March 26th, 2008 #16
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THE FARPOINT SITE (CA-LAN-451): A RECENTLY DISCOVERED CLOVIS CULTURE SITE DIRECTLY ON THE WEST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES



"The Farpoint Site...is extremely important...for under-
standing the earliest pre-history of the Americas. Hence the site is of national significance and requires an interdisciplinary research program and protection."

— Dennis Stanford, Ph.D.
Director of the Paleoindian/
Paleoecology Program
Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C.
Posted by Dr. Gary Stickel 0 comments



THE FARPOINT SITE (CA-LAN-451): A UNIQUE CLOVIS CULTURE SITE OF THE FIRST AMERICANS ON THE MALIBU COAST

by

Dr. E. Gary Stickel
Principal Archaeologist for the Farpoint Project

The Farpoint Site (State of California formal designation: CA-LAN-451), is a recent and major archaeological discovery in California. The exciting discovery at the site was a Clovis projectile point (spearhead). The point was miraculously saved by Mr. Edgar Perez, Native American Cultural Resources Specialist, while he was monitoring a backhoe excavating a trench for a new mansion development on Point Dume. We knew we had a major find but we didn't know how major until we closely examined the specimen in our laboratory. It was noticed that the stone point did not fit the local archaeological record. Instead its precise overall shape, its slightly concave base and the fact that it had "fluted flakes" detached from its base, were all attributes indicating that the point belonged to the Clovis Culture. The Clovis Culture is the oldest identifiable culture in the New World. The name derives from the town of Clovis, New Mexico where the first Clovis site was found. Not being Clovis experts ourselves, we had the point examined by the foremost Clovis expert scholars around the country (including Prof. Vance Haynes, Univ. of Arizona; Professor Bruce Huckell, Director of the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology at the Univ. of New Mexico, and Prof. Don Johnson, Univ. of Illinois). Also Dr. Dennis Stanford, Chief Archaeologist at the Smithsonian, not only confirmed the find as Clovis, but states the unique status of the Farpoint Site in the Americas (see his quotes below). The Clovis Culture dates from about 11,500 Before Present to possibly as late as 11,000 years ago. It is also the widest spread of any ancient culture in the New World, ranging from Canada to Venezuela and from the U.S. eastern seaboard to the west, with the Farpoint site being the first discovery of a Clovis Site with a subsurface imbedded point at "continent's end," on the dramatic Point Dume along the Malibu coast. The world of the time Clovis was the late Ice Age (Pleistocene Epoch), one with many glaciers, frigid landscapes and ice-cold rivers and waterways. Ancient Clovis People used their distinctive Clovis Points to hunt the "megafauna" (or big game) of the Late Pleistocene, game such as the large mammoths, mastodons and extinct bison.

There are two theories for the origins of the Clovis Culture. The traditional theory is that Clovis represents ancient Native Americans who immigrated across the Bering Land Bridge, between Siberia and Alaska and from there they made their way ever south until both North and South America were inhabited. However, according to Dr. Dennis Stanford, there are no antecedents for the Clovis spearheads in Asia whereas there are in ancient Europe. Therefore he believes Clovis people originated from the Solutrean Culture of what is now Spain and France, and coursing their way on boats along the coastlines of northwest Europe and then westward around Iceland, Greenland, to Nova Scotia, then southward along the Atlantic seaboard until they reached what is now the SE United States. From there Clovis proliferated and expanded westward, inhabiting virtually every State, until the Farpoint Site was reached at Continent's end. Dr. Stanford told me, however, that if we obtained a radiocarbon date earlier than the Clovis sites in the eastern U.S., he might have to revise his theory. That's how important the Farpoint Site is. Also if we were to find even one human tooth of the Clovis from Farpoint, we could do mitochondrial DNA analysis of it and see if there is a genetic match indicating which theory would appear to be correct. I also want to mention that we have already obtained (in 2000) a radiocarbon date of 9,000 years ago, which made Farpoint the oldest site in the City of Malibu at that time. Dr. Stanford believes Farpoint will date to 11,000 years ago or to the time of terminal Clovis. I also want to mention that the Chumash Native Americans have extensive remains at the Farpoint Site apparently above the Clovis material. We need to answer questions as to how early they were there and did they interact with the Clovis people? Only further research will answer these questions. Unfortunately the owner/developer of the property where the site is located, has stopped cooperating with us and has been, unfortunately, unnecessarily destroying parts of the site (e.g. with long excavated trenches apparently for a lawn sprinkler system, etc.). Thus the support group, The Friends of Farpoint was created to push for the preservation of not only this most important site, but to push for changes in the laws pertaining to cultural resources in the City of Malibu, State of California and, indeed, in the
Nation, so that discoveries of sites like Farpoint in the future will be recognized, protected and preserved for the edification of all citizens in the U.S., indeed around the world.
The Farpoint Site is of National and International interest, the following quotes are examples. As Dr. Stanford recently stated:

"I have examined ...the 'Clovis' biface from the Farpoint Site. There is no question that the artifact was made using Clovis technology and thereby indicates that the site was occupied by Clovis people over 11,000 years ago.

...the discovery of a Clovis age occupation at the site is extremely important not only for the local archaeological record, but for understanding the earliest pre*history of the Americas. Hence the site is of national significance and requires an interdisciplinary research program and protection."

And Dr. Stanford goes on to state the uniqueness of the new site:

"...until the discovery of the Farpoint Site, no 'in situ' Clovis age sites are known along the west coast of the Americas."

— Dennis Stanford, Ph.D.
Director of the Paleoindian/
Paleoecology Program
Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C.

The London Times ran a story (Feb. 10, 2007) on the Farpoint Site's discovery, and since then a Press Conference was held (May 2, 2007) at the George C. Page Museum of La Brea Fossil Discoveries (held there because Richard Reynolds of the Museum analyzed and identified all of our recovered animal bones from Farpoint). Following that there have been a string of good articles in the Malibu Papers about the site. For example, Anne Soble, Editor of the Malibu Surfside News said in her newspaper's editorial, "...it (the Farpoint Site) is going to be the subject of great interest to not only archaeologists but also to those in every classroom throughout the world where the origins of human society are studied." And last August 3 (2007) California's State Historical Resources Commission (SHRC) voted virtually unanimously to recommend James Flaherty's and my nomination of the site to the National Register of Historic Places. Another good development was last week, when the Director of the University of Arizona's Accelerator Mass Spectrometer Laboratory (funded by the National Science Foundation) agreed to run radiocarbon samples to obtain the needed new dating for the Farpoint Site. Thus there has been both good academic, government institutional (the SHRC) and popular media recognition of the Farpoint Site. We invite you to become a member of the Friends of Farpoint and help us in this good endeavor to save our past for the future.

William Faulkner said, "The past is never dead, it's not even past." To help us keep our past alive, please join the Friends of Farpoint. The Friends have a two-fold purpose at present: 1) To save the Farpoint Site, which presently is endangered and has been suffering unwarranted destructions of parts of it over the last year; 2) To sign up people on our petition, the goal of which is to promote better legislation at the city, state and national levels to properly protect Farpoint and other such sites in the future for our national cultural heritage. To join please contact:

Dr. Gary Stickel, ph. (323) 937-6997; e-mail: [email protected].

We look forward to you joining with us on this exciting odyssey.



Google Earth satellite photo of Point Dume, where the Farpoint Site is located. Point Dume is the most prominent landform feature along the 27-mile Malibu coast.

http://sundagger-egs.blogspot.com/se...&max-results=5

Last edited by Alex Linder; March 26th, 2008 at 01:53 AM.
 
Old March 26th, 2008 #17
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While any historical artifacts found are the property of the landowner, items are usually donated to local museums or cultural centers. The Clovis spearhead now resides at the Santa Barbara Natural History Museum.

"There might be evidence of an entire Clovis occupation on this property," Stickel said, who has excavated at Machu Picchu in Peru and Achilles' birthplace in Greece. "I am ready to oversee excavation for free and I can get a team of students to work for free. But the landowner isn't interested in any further research on her property."

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com...howtopic=91918
 
Old March 26th, 2008 #18
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Early Americans Arrived Thousands of Years Earlier Than Previously Believed

ScienceDaily (Mar. 21, 2008) — A team led by two Texas A&M University anthropologists now believes the first Americans came to this country 1,000 to 2,000 years earlier than the 13,500 years ago previously thought, which could shift historic timelines.

The team's findings are outlined in a review article in the journal Science entitled "The Late Pleistocene Dispersal of Modern Humans in the Americas," which synthesizes new data suggesting the migration from Alaska started about 15,000 years ago.

This theory is supported by not only archaeological evidence, but also from genetic evidence from living and ancient populations, says Ted Goebel, an anthropology professor at Texas A&M and associate director of Texas A&M's Center for the Study of the First Americans. He conducted the research with Michael R. Waters, a fellow anthropology professor at Texas A&M and director of the Center for the Study of the First Americans, and Dennis H. O'Rourke, an anthropology professor at the University of Utah.

Previous theories stated that the first migrants spread from Beringia to Tierra del Fuego over a few centuries about. Goebel says scientists have concluded that the peopling of America was a much more complex process.

The team focused primarily on molecular genetic, archaeological and human skeletal evidence to create a working model that explains the dispersal of modern humans across the New World.

Molecular geneticists have used refined method and an increasing sample of living populations and ancient remains to provide information on the Old World origins of the first Americans, the timing of their initial migration to the New World and the number of major dispersal events.

Archaeologists have found new sites and reinvestigated old ones using new methods to explain how early populations colonized North and South America.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0320120714.htm
 
Old May 16th, 2008 #19
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Seaweed clears up ancient American mystery


14,000-year-old leftovers could be earliest signs of humans in New World

An excavation at Chile's Monte Verde archaeological site reveals this wishbone-shaped structure, which is thought to be a medicine hut and was found to contain several chewed cuds. The cuds, consisting of seaweed and other plants, were apparently used for medicinal purposes.

WASHINGTON - Remains of meals that included seaweed are helping confirm the date of a settlement in southern Chile that may offer the earliest evidence of humans in the Americas.

Researchers date the seaweed found at Monte Verde to more than 14,000 years ago, 1,000 years earlier than the well-studied Clovis culture.

And the report comes just a month after other scientists announced they had found coprolites — fossilized human feces — dating to about 14,000 years ago in a cave in Oregon.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24525317/
 
Old May 17th, 2008 #20
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Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: At a roadside pub near you
Posts: 401
Dave Callous
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Alex,It's very nice to see you back on the forum.Once more,it would be great if you could start broadcasting again right here on VNN.Don Black and David Duke are quite a pair,but they're no match for Alex Linder!
 
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