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Old October 8th, 2013 #1
keifer
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Anyone interested in discussing archery?
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #2
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More on this later when I can give an affective review. This bow goes for 130 bucks on Cabelas website. Don't buy the package deal because the extras that come in the kit are low grade. I ordered this bow with the intentions of having a back up bow to my compound bow with out all the complications that go with protecting the preciousness expensive piece of gear, something to throw behind the seat of my truck, carry in a pack. This is for quick deployment whack-a-rabbit tool. Also for simplicity when considering that with a compound bow the archer has one hand and arm rendered just about useless when carrying the compound bow and with the other hand handicapped to some degree by having a release (trigger system) strapped around the wrist.

 
Old October 19th, 2013 #3
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In this video he is using a trigger release system. This bow can be outfitted with everything a compound bow can including sites. Define your objective and let your objective define your gear and accessories.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #4
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To establish your draw length, hold your arms straight out to your sides in a wing span and measure finger tip to finger tip on the middle fingers. Divide by 2.5, and that will get your number.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #5
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How to establish your eye dominance for aim.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #6
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Lots of info here on tuning a bow, but none of each topic is in any great detail. This video will give a general introduction on topics for further investigation.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #7
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Concepts for paper tuning your bow for correct arrow flight.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keifer View Post
Anyone interested in discussing archery?
I'm interested in watching you discuss it. I'm ignorant.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #9
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....or to put it simply, if you aim at a deer and miss, you miss the deer, if you aim at a tuft of hair and miss, you still hit the deer.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #10
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This video:Types of aim.
With instinctive shooting, particularly with hunting there is this question that will come into play when judging distance: "Is that a big target far away(that makes it look small), or is that a small target that is up close?"(that will make it look bigger)
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #11
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The basics for shot placement on animals go like this: There are four contacts for an ideal shot that involve arrow entrance of the first lung, arrow exit of that lung and then entrance into the second lung and then again the exit. The animal drowns in their own blood. Don't aim at the heart or a portion of good meat is likely to be compromised on the harvest. Retrieve your arrow and look for blood as an indication of good shot placement whereas any discolored fluid like that of a yellow tint would indicate a gut shot. Never run up on your game after it has been shot or you will end up spooking the deer and it will run to the next county. Usually they don't know what happened since there is no loud bang of a gun, and they will run a short distance and lay down to recoup. Give it an hour before approaching, however this requires discipline on part of the patient hunter especially at the end of day when darkness approaches. Because they are not alarmed by gun shot there is less likely a chance that they have adrenaline pumping through their system that is said to taint the taste of the meat. The only ethical shot is the first shot, if that does not disable the animal then shoot away.
There are two schools of thought regarding archery, the target shooters who are almost always liberals and generally lack shooting skills in a real world environment that deals with elevation/decline, low lighting and weather. Again this is a generalization that even if it is only 75% correct then that is still a passing grade on my estimation.
And then there are the hunters.
 
Old October 19th, 2013 #12
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For tracking an injured animal, blood sometimes becomes discolored and looks similar to iron deposits on rocks and then there are weather elements that will hide blood trails. For that carry Hydrogen Peroxide that when is mixed with blood it will create a reaction and foam up as shown in this video.
 
Old October 24th, 2013 #13
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Keifer, any thoughts on whether a bow could still be a viable weapon for battle? Particularly for something like a surprise attack, or guerrilla warfare? Any setups that provide night vision sights or could work with night vision goggles?

Can you buy arrows that can punch through kevlar?
 
Old October 24th, 2013 #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keifer View Post
Anyone interested in discussing archery?
Yeah one of those thing I always wanted to learn,
got into firearms but this was always interesting..
plus really thought it very cool weapon after '"Rambo pt2"..
__________________
"To survive a war, you gotta become war."

Rambo, John J.
 
Old October 24th, 2013 #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowe View Post
Keifer, any thoughts on whether a bow could still be a viable weapon for battle? Particularly for something like a surprise attack, or guerrilla warfare? Any setups that provide night vision sights or could work with night vision goggles?

Can you buy arrows that can punch through kevlar?
I will look into night vision options, but I would be skeptical, however if it is gear you seek then maybe what you have in mind is a cross bow. First time shooters of cross bows are usually deadly accurate. Most bow sites have night glow and many have lighting options, but most states prohibit any scopes with lighting features while hunting regulated species like deer. If your state allows hunting at night for specific animals like coyotes, then that would be a good option for practicing night time tactics with any weapon.

As far as puncture capabilities is concerned, a clean broadside shot on a deer with a broadhead tip will go clean through and still travel another ten-fifteen yards (enough to injure/kill a deer standing on the other-side of the intended target deer). Recover the arrow and inspect it for fluids. Blood, especially with bubbles is a good indication of good shot placement on the lungs. Yellow is an indication of bile or stomach fluids which means chances of recovering the deer are minimal.
A common mistake is when people release their arrow and try to look around the bow to see where the arrow hits. Follow through on a shot is important, don't move the bow until you hear the arrow contact hit on the target of any kind rather meat or paper. At any rate, you may not know where the arrow hit. Even on a twenty yard indoor stationary target the arrows can be hard to see with the eye.
A shooter can silence their bow with string silencers that attach to the strings. They are fluffy looking things like a fishing lure, usually rubber but they work well and are cheap to buy or make. Then there are limb savers that go on the limbs that absorb vibration upon release of the arrow like that of the string silencers, they too are inexpensive and they work. Stabilizers, not generally inexpensive, will screw into the bow and extend outward toward the target. Many can be described visually as being a rubber dildo on the bow. They add counter balance on the bow and again absorb vibration on the bow which will help to silence your shot. There is such a thing called "Jumping the String" which occurs when the prey like a deer hear the shot and flinch or jump which compromises the shot placement even on a fast bow that throws an arrow at about or above 300 feet per second.
In general terms the difference between a target bow and a hunting bow is the gear a person puts on the bow. For example, on a target bow the stabilizer might extend out by three feet, whereas a hunting stabilizer is shorter so as to not limit the hunter in their ability to navigate tree stands and heavy bush.
Another concept is site radius. With bows that have sites, with recurve this is optional, but a compound this is not optional, there is the rear site that is a O-Ring placed between the twisted strands of string. When the bow is drawn, that peep site will draw right up to the eye with in an inch. The shooter peeps through the rear site and lines it up with the frame of the front sites that are round like that of the peepsite. That front site is on an armature that extends from the bow toward the target. The farther away from the bow will increase the distance from the rear site peepsite to the front site which increases site radius in the same manner as going from a pistol to a rifle. You can see this as a benefit, and on target bows the sites extend in a way that seems excessive on its profile, whereas with hunting bows the site radius is shorter so that gear does not get caught on brush. Sites on a compound are susceptible to being knocked out of alignment.

Last edited by keifer; October 24th, 2013 at 10:35 AM.
 
Old October 24th, 2013 #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowe View Post
Keifer, any thoughts on whether a bow could still be a viable weapon for battle? Particularly for something like a surprise attack, or guerrilla warfare? Any setups that provide night vision sights or could work with night vision goggles?

Can you buy arrows that can punch through kevlar?
Here is an Arrow vs Kevlar test.
Thanks for asking this question. It resulted in an interesting search. The Bodkin Arrow tip, ancient, historic, and still applies today.
 
Old October 24th, 2013 #17
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Here are some generalized terms and conditions for hunting. The importance of rabbits can't be overstated for the beginner archery hunter. If a person can't stalk a rabbit then most likely they will be not be successful with deer. A rabbit is exact proportions of a kill zone on a deer. If you can jack a rabbit at 40 yards then you can get ideal placement on a deer. What ever six inch groups a person can maintain with ten shots at any given distance is their distance limits. Ten arrows within six inches grouping at 50 yards would be their range, but ten arrows at sixty yards with seven inch group is beyond the shooters ethical limit or the limits of the bow.
A first time shooter of a compound bow that is tuned up and sited in can be shooting four inch groups at twenty yards in less than an hours time. What ever grouping at twenty yards, for example four inch, will be eight inch groups at forty yards.
 
Old October 26th, 2013 #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keifer View Post
Here is an Arrow vs Kevlar test.
Thanks for asking this question. It resulted in an interesting search. The Bodkin Arrow tip, ancient, historic, and still applies today.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IM7Bz2vXtY
Interesting video. That bodkin tip actually did a lot better than I figured it would vs kevlar. So to penetrate kevlar enough for a kill shot, you'd need a longer bodkin? And that was with a 50 lb pull. I bet a crossbow with a 100 or 150 lb pull would get full body penetration even through kevlar.
 
Old October 26th, 2013 #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crowe View Post
Interesting video. That bodkin tip actually did a lot better than I figured it would vs kevlar. So to penetrate kevlar enough for a kill shot, you'd need a longer bodkin? And that was with a 50 lb pull. I bet a crossbow with a 100 or 150 lb pull would get full body penetration even through kevlar.
One thing to note on that test is that they used a soft target. Just from my experiences with throwing axes, where I used hay bales until getting more confidence that I would not brake the wood handles, I learned that soft targets do not have rewarding affects. The axe which was razor sharp actually bounced off the hay bale whereas with a wood target there was penetration. If there is interest in making homemade targets here is some advice. A softer target will allow penetration to where the fletchings become buried and consequently the shooter will constantly be replacing the fletchings. A target too rigid will result in a shortened life of the arrow.

My humble opinion is that hunting is the truest form of archery in that there are many variables at play that a calibrated shooting range seeks to eliminate. The best and most fun target shooting is 3-D shooting on an outdoor course. The target I use is a broken off chunk of a 3-D deer about the size of a basketball. Invariably it costs me three arrows with one getting broke, one lost and one losing its fletchings when it digs into the ground. When shooting on incline or decline the rule of thumb is to aim low to compensate for the angle on the arrow having less drag from gravity resulting in the arrow shooting high.

None of the variables in archery are too difficult to grasp in and of them selves, and one might be inclined to say that archery is not rocket science except for the fact that is exactly what it is when considering the shooter is launching a missile. The very definition of archery with all its combined variables is that of the Quadratic Equation.
 
Old October 26th, 2013 #20
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3-D Target shooting.
 
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