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Old August 17th, 2008 #21
Marse Supial
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seeer View Post
The whole legal industry is a scam, it is the only industry a working adult cannot train for since there are no true part-time school, now that we have nurse practitioners. Why is it necessary for 8 years (including licensing exam prep) to write a will?
There are a number of law schools that offer adult study programs -- night classes, weekend classes, flex classes and such. They are usually in the larger cities, but it's not impossible.

If all you were going to do was draft simple wills, you could get by with a lot less than the full curriculum. But law school doesn't work like that. You get the full program -- Property law, Evidence law, Contract law, Constitutional law, Tort law, Civil Procedure, Criminal Procedure, Criminal Law, Sales & Financing, Corporate Law.

Plus, all of this stuff ties in together. Wills can't be separatied from property law. Property law can't be completely separated from contract law which also ties into Constitutional law &c.

Quote:
It is also the only industry to control a branch of government. Originally most lawyers were farmers that did law in the winter as a side business so many trades were represented.

Kikes control the legal industry, so they control a whole branch of government.
I wouldn't say that jews control the law. They are vastly over-represented and that needs to change. But by far and away, the majority of lawyers and judges are white men. Now you wouldn't get that impression from watching TV where the judge is ALWAYS a negress, but that's TV.
 
Old August 17th, 2008 #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
I wouldn't say that jews control the law. They are vastly over-represented and that needs to change. But by far and away, the majority of lawyers and judges are white men. Now you wouldn't get that impression from watching TV where the judge is ALWAYS a negress, but that's TV.
Depends on what is meant by ''control the law''. Marbury v. Madison was the mandate for judicial sovereignty, and it was fully realized in the Civil War amendments, IMO. Since Roosevelt, the Fed. judiciary has essentially become a Rabbinical sovereign.

Jews don't ''control the law'' in a day to day sense in all places, but they certainly hold ultimate authority over its parameters and the substantive rights therein.
 
Old August 17th, 2008 #23
Marse Supial
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Slightly off topic:

The legal field is so flooded with aspiring new lawyers right now it's scary. These kids are coming out of law school and many of them have absolutely no hope of finding a job in the field that they have spent 3 years and up to 100K training for. Some law firms are laying off lawyers.

Yes, experienced lawyers still make a pretty good living, but I wouldn't commend the idea of law school to anyone right now unless it has absolutely been your life-long ambition.

GREL
 
Old August 17th, 2008 #24
M. Kraus
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Default At Yale...

http://www.law.yale.edu/faculty/faculty.htm


Again, I've left out "borderline" names. There's probably a few
more jews on the faculty than what is listed here.


1. Howard E. Abrams
2. Jack M. Balkin
3. Aharon Barak (alumnus, Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
4. Robert A. Burt
5. Morris L. Cohen
6. Jules L. Coleman
7. Daniel J. Freed
8. Paul Gewirtz
9. Dan M. Kahan
10.Paul W. Kahn
11.Jay Katz
12.S. Blair Kauffman
13.Anthony T. Kronman
14.Yair Listokin
15.Daniel Markovits
16.W. Michael Reisman (alumnus, Hebrew University)
17.Judith Resnik
18.Susan Rose-Ackerman
19.Jed Rubenfeld
20.Peter H. Schuck
21.Alan Schwartz
22.Ian Shapiro
23.Scott Shapiro
24.Robert J. Shiller
25.Reva Siegel
26.Dan Simon (alumnus, Tel Aviv University)
27.Robert Solomon
28.Alex Stein (alumnus, Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
29.Lior Strahilevitz
30.Stephen Wizner (Sackler Professor of Law at Tel Aviv University)

98 total


30/98 = 31%
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Old August 17th, 2008 #25
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There is a white gentile critic of the "overlawyering" of America named Walter Olson, who runs a blog called "overlawyered.com" I read this blog, and his other writings, and he's got an Aryan instinct for the big scam, but says nothing about Jews. In fact, after several years of blogging, he took on a Jewish sidekick named Ted Frank, whose posts are greasy and self-serving compared to the cool and witty writing of Olson. The gentile-Jew split manifests itself in their own postings: Olson will decry such things as Holocaust denial laws in Europe, while Frank enjoys bashing Ron Paul as a crank.
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Old August 18th, 2008 #26
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Default At Stanford...

http://www.law.stanford.edu/directory/

1.Joseph Bankman
2.Paul Brest
3.Joshua Cohen
4.William Cohen
5.Michele Landis Dauber
6.Barbara H. Fried
7.Lawrence M. Friedman
8.Paul Goldstein
9.Joseph A. Grundfest
10.Thomas C. Heller
11.Pamela S. Karlan
12.Mark G. Kelman
13.Amalia D. Kessler
14.Michael Klausner
15.Larry Kramer (Dean)
16.Lawrence Lessig
17.Lawrence C. Marshall (alumnus,Beth Hatalmud College,Jerusalem)
18.David W. Mills (co-chairman of the Board of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund)
19.Alison D. Morantz
20.A. Mitchell Polinsky
21.Robert L. Rabin
22.David Rosenhan
23.Jane Schacter
24.Jeff Strnad
25.Allen Weiner
26.Robert Weisberg


66 Total


26/66 = 39%
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Old August 18th, 2008 #27
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Default At Columbia...

http://www.law.columbia.edu/faculty/full_time_fac


1.Mark Barenberg
2.Barbara Aronstein Black
3.Lori Fisler Damrosch
4.Ariela Dubler
5.Jeffrey A. Fagan (Research/Courses Taught: Racial Profiling; Social Contagion of Violence)
6.Jane C. Ginsburg
7.Suzanne Goldberg
8.Victor P. Goldberg
9.Harvey J. Goldschmid
10.Zohar Goshen (alumnus, Hebrew University)
11.Jack Greenberg (Argued before U.S. Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education, 1954)
12.Philip Hamburger
13.Michael A. Heller
14.Avery W. Katz
15.Benjamin L. Liebman
16.Carol B. Liebman
17.James S. Liebman
18.Lance Liebman
19.Eben Moglen
20.Joseph Raz (alumnus, Hebrew University)
21.Daniel C. Richman
22.Peter Rosenblum
23.Charles F. Sabel
24.Carol Sanger
25.Barbara Schatz
26.David M. Schizer (Dean)
27.Michael I. Sovern (alumnus, Tel Aviv University)
28.Jane M. Spinak
29.Susan P. Sturm

87 total


29/87 = 33%
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Old August 19th, 2008 #28
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Anyone who wonders why this is important should sometime look up the backgrounds of presidential appointees and other political appointees in the executive branch. They are at the subcabinet level in the cabinet departments (such as assistant secretary and deputy assistant secretary), and in similar posts in regulatory agencies. These are the people who really make public policy, by channeling information up to the better-known higher-ups, by framing the major alternatives (and disregarding any others), and by directly making all sorts of lesser decisions that can add up to major impact. One example is the role of the Jew Douglas Feith in making the case for the Iraq war, but this goes on in all agencies. These people are especially powerful in the regulatory agencies, which are subject to very limited oversight by any other branch of government.

You’ll find that a huge share of these political appointees are lawyers, most from the brand name law schools featured in this thread (Feith went to #14 Georgetown, following #1 Harvard College). That is true even excluding specifically legal positions such as at the Department of Justice and the General Counsel of other agencies. That is, most of these lawyers are not practicing law, they are deciding the substance of public policy. It may seem strange, in that there are people who seem to have more relevant credentials to do that, such as degrees in public policy itself, and in all sorts of technical fields related to specific policies. Those people are of course in government, more commonly as civil servants. But more often than not they work for politically-appointed lawyers, and carry out those lawyers’ wishes.

I’m not sure why this is, and it isn’t as typical in Europe. It may just be that lawyers’ facility with words (quibbling) helps them to sell dubious policies to others like themselves (such as Congressmen, also mostly lawyers) and to the media. It may also be that the big D.C. law firms are convenient, lucrative places to be when out of office. Whatever the case, these lawyers are immensely powerful, and who’s indoctrinated them and to believe what should be of interest to the rest of us.
 
Old August 22nd, 2008 #29
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as Mario Puzzo wrote in The Godfather, "a lawyer with a briefcase can steal more than a hundred men with guns."
 
Old August 27th, 2008 #30
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I remember reading an article in The Economist magazine that came
out in the early 90's about the large number of lawyers in America and
the negative effect it had on GNP. The article stated that the "ideal"
number of lawyers for economic efficiency would be no more than
400,000. I believe at the time there were 1 million lawyers in America.
So basically all these lawyers slow down the economy by a signifigant
amount. America needs more scientists and engineers and fewer
lawyers in order to compete with the rest of the world.
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Old September 1st, 2008 #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
There are a number of law schools that offer adult study programs -- night classes, weekend classes, flex classes and such.

If all you were going to do was draft simple wills, you could get by with a lot less than the full curriculum.

Plus, all of this stuff ties in together. Wills can't be separatied from property law.
Wow, they sure have you fooled. Those part-time law school have to be done in 4 years, its just an extra year so it is not really part-time.

Full curriculum? Someone with a bachelor in paralegal studies covered all those classes. Louisiana has Civil Law Notaries that are allowed to draft contracts, wills, trusts, do house closings, etc. and the world does not come to an end.

Including lost wages it cost $300,000 to become a lawyer, paid for my the government and/or the lawyer. It is a scam to keep the competition out.
 
Old September 2nd, 2008 #32
Marse Supial
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seeer View Post
Wow, they sure have you fooled. Those part-time law school have to be done in 4 years, its just an extra year so it is not really part-time.
The law school that I went to allowed 6 years for part time students to graduate. I think that's pretty much the standard now.

Quote:
Full curriculum? Someone with a bachelor in paralegal studies covered all those classes. Louisiana has Civil Law Notaries that are allowed to draft contracts, wills, trusts, do house closings, etc. and the world does not come to an end.
True. There's a lot of legal work that can be done very competently by non-lawyers, and is in fact. In our office, paralegals usually do stuff like wills and house closings and other paperwork heavy stuff. Then the lawyer has a meeting with the client to make sure the client's wishes are clear and looks over the paperwork and makes sure everything is good to go.

Quote:
Including lost wages it cost $300,000 to become a lawyer, paid for my the government and/or the lawyer.
It ain't cheap, but 300K? Tuition at the Ole Miss Law School this fall is only 10k per year. http://www.law.olemiss.edu/admissions/faq.html Books run you another $1200 per year if you buy them all new. I suppose that if you were making close to 100K per year and quit your job to go to law school, then yeah, it might add up to that. But most folks go in right out of undergrad and go to law school and work part time while they're in school.


Quote:
It is a scam to keep the competition out.
I guess any licensing requirement, study requirement, tuition requirement, character requirement &c. has the effect of keeping competition out. But I don't think that's the primary objective of it.

But I'm perfectly comfortable with having some minimum standards that people have to meet before practicing law. As much so as with practicing medicine. There are enough idiots practicing law even with the requirements. I don't want to think about what it would be like if all that was required to be licensed was to raise a hand.

But as the barriers to entry go, law school is the easy part. The bar exam is what's a bitch. Different states have different degrees of difficulty, and suprisingly, Mississippi's is considered to be the 5th hardest in the nation. Three 8 hour days of solid testing. A group of niggers had a lawsuit against the bar association a few years ago complaining that the bar exam was too hard and washed out too many negros who had successfully completed law school but couldn't pass the bar exam.

GREL

Last edited by Marse Supial; September 2nd, 2008 at 02:04 PM.
 
Old September 2nd, 2008 #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
The law school that I went to allowed 6 years for part time students to graduate. I think that's pretty much the standard now. Everywhere I went says ABA rules says a max of 4 years. Ole Miss does not have part time

There's a lot of legal work that can be done very competently by non-lawyers, and is in fact. In our office, paralegals usually do stuff like wills As long as it in your office?

It ain't cheap, but 300K? Tuition at the Ole Miss Law School this fall is only 10k per year. Ole Miss is public, so the taxpayer pays, I also included years of lost wages.

licensing requirement, study requirement, tuition requirement, character requirement &c. has the effect of keeping competition out.

But I'm perfectly comfortable with having some minimum standards that people have to meet before practicing law. As much so as with practicing medicine. Requirements to practice law to ripoff the public are MAXimum requirements. 8 years including bar review?
1. If the paralegals can do it, why can't people go straight to paralegals like in Louisiana? (Civil Law Notaries)

2. Ole Miss is a public school, so the taxpayer is paying. My figures including lost wages are accurate.

3. Almost all countries only require a bachelor degree to be a lawyer. You did not explain why someone with a bachelor degree in paralegal studies, 10 years experience, pass the National Certified paralegal exam, the state exam, background check will be put in jail for writing a will for a person, without giving a cut to a lawyer that did nothing.

Medical Doctors? Nurse Practitioners prescribe medicine without MD supervision and in most states have their own practices, so do not compare the legal monopoly to medicine where there is consumer choice. Besides, an MD actually does good for the world.

4. Old Miss does not have part time, I went to the site.
In addition, every site I went to says ABA rules says P/T must be done in 4 years.
Quote:
at every ABA-accredited law school, a part-time program must be completed in four years.
As you can see, you are wrong. The legal industry is eating this country out of house and home. Besides, the judge knows the law, why can't defendants ask the judge what the law is like in other countries?

Louisiana Civil Law Notary Association: http://www.pclna.org/

From Old Miss Law School
Quote:
Can I attend part-time?
No, we do not offer a part-time program. Our program is a full-time, day-time program only. http://www.law.olemiss.edu/admissions/faq.html

Last edited by seeer; September 2nd, 2008 at 09:04 PM.
 
Old September 2nd, 2008 #34
Marse Supial
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Don't be so angry seeer. We're on the same side, bro.

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Originally Posted by seeer View Post
1. If the paralegals can do it, why can't people go straight to paralegals like in Louisiana? (Civil Law Notaries)
Because most of the country doesn't operate under a Civil Law system like Louisiana does. They have a code (i.e. step by step instructions) for everything. The other 49 states (to varying degrees) operate on the Common Law system. The former draws mostly from a 'code'. The latter draws mostly from caselaw, which makes things exponentially more complicated.

Some states (namely California) are changing to allow para professionals to handle routine drafting tasks. But I can tell you from personal experience, I get a lot of business straightening out things that clients tried to do things on the cheap with a 'will kit' or 'legal zoom' or some such. And invariably these clients spend 5 times as much getting a mess straightened out as they would have had it been done right the first go round. I've seen people literally and absolutely unnecessarily lose their homes because they tried to file bankruptcy by copying their friend's petition and filing it themselves. So I send legal zoom a 'Merry Christmas' card every year. "Keep up the good work, boys."

Quote:
2. Ole Miss is a public school, so the taxpayer is paying. My figures including lost wages are accurate.
I went to a private school. Not ivy league, but what is referred to as second tier. The costs there are about twice that of private schools, but still nowhere near $300k. If you're already making that kind of money, law school isn't a good investment for you. I was just using Ole Miss as a cost example.

Quote:
3. Almost all countries only require a bachelor degree to be a lawyer. You did not explain why someone with a bachelor degree in paralegal studies, 10 years experience, pass the National Certified paralegal exam, the state exam, background check will be put in jail for writing a will for a person, without giving a cut to a lawyer that did nothing.

Medical Doctors? Nurse Practitioners prescribe medicine without MD supervision and in most states have their own practices, so do not compare the legal monopoly to medicine where there is consumer choice. Besides, an MD actually does good for the world.
You're a lawyer hater. And nothing I could say is going to change that. Lawyer haters are like men haters. There's not much reasoning with them, but I still try. I agree that the system isn't perfect, but the way to change it is not to allow even less qualified people to practice.

You keep going back to wills. Most wills are easy. So easy in fact, that it's hard to justify charging more than $100 bucks or so for the very simple ones. But if you want to do some estate planning that may have some tax implications, you better know what you're doing. And that requires a semeter or two of studying the tax code and the applicable federal regulations.

Lots of professions have licensing requirements. Plumbing is a good example. Any idiot can put a new flapper in a toilet. Any idiot can put a new flapper in their best friend's or their next door neighbors toilet. But if you're going to hold yourself out as a professional plumber and charge people money for it, you've got to pass the test and get a license.

Quote:
4. Old Miss does not have part time, I went to the site. In addition, every site I went to says ABA rules says P/T must be done in 4 years.
I'll take your word for it. But the school I went to allowed 6. But if you're losing 75K or 80K per year in lost wages, it'd behoove you to get it over with as quickly as possible.

Quote:
As you can see, you are wrong. The legal industry is eating this country out of house and home.
I love you too.

Quote:
Besides, the judge knows the law, why can't defendants ask the judge what the law is like in other countries?
Not always does the judge know the law. Sometimes the judge is an idiot or a negress. Sometimes the law is not clear. Sometimes litigation is about factual questions. As often as not, there's a question about what the law is. That is the function of an appellate court in a common law system: To make the law where there is no law of the case.

But that being said, a litigant CAN ask the judge to make a ruling on what the law is. It comes in the form of a motion for judgment on the pleadings, or motion for summary judgment, or a declaratory judgment action or a number of other ways.

Last edited by Marse Supial; September 2nd, 2008 at 10:22 PM.
 
Old September 3rd, 2008 #35
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Originally Posted by General_Lee View Post
Because most of the country doesn't operate under a Civil Law system like Louisiana does. The law has been becoming more like the rest of the country over the years. Besides, a common law state can permit licensing for people limited to trusts, house closing etc. like Louisiana, the world will not come to an end.

I get a lot of business straightening out things that clients tried to do things on the cheap with a 'will kit' or 'legal zoom' or some such. I am talking about licensed professionals, with a bachelor degree and passing a test.

The costs there are about twice that of private schools, but still nowhere near $300k. I included 8 years of lost wage (4+3+ 1 year for bar review. ) Think how much the person could of made working as a plumber for 8 years.

You're a lawyer hater. I merely believe the licensing of lawyers should change and paralegals should not the threatened with force and put in jail for for drafting a custom will.

But if you want to do some estate planning that may have some tax implications, {{{ requires a semeter or two of studying the tax code and the applicable federal regulations. If you want the best tax advice, use a CPA. A tax lawyer is practicing CPA work without a CPA license. Ever notice many tax attorneys are also CPAs?

if you're going to hold yourself out as a professional plumber and charge people money for it, you've got to pass the test and get a license. I said that lawyers should continue to be licensed, just that the requirements should be reasonable like in England.

Not always does the judge know the law. But that being said, a litigant CAN ask the judge to make a ruling on what the law is. I am talking about asking questions informally, like during a DWI trial, like they do in many other countries. If they can do this in other countries it means the world will not come to an end.
Civil Law Notaries: Needed in every state. (Common Law Notaries in the other 49?) The problem is the legal monopoly is actually devouring the economy and has become a drag on the system. They have a lock on the state legislatures that they use as a stranglehold on the country.

Last edited by seeer; September 3rd, 2008 at 09:23 PM.
 
Old September 4th, 2008 #36
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Originally Posted by seeer View Post
3. Almost all countries only require a bachelor degree to be a lawyer.
I don't understand that either. Why can't you just go to college here and major in law the way you major in engineering? If you're old enough to learn ODE, why not SEC?

Last edited by Mike Parker; September 4th, 2008 at 07:51 AM.
 
Old September 8th, 2008 #37
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This is only the tip of the iceberg. This f'ed up situation goes all the way up to the top. To the supreme court. Now you can get an inkling as to why Matt Hale was so pissed off.
 
Old September 11th, 2008 #38
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Default "The effect of Jewish Supreme Court Justices on constitutional law"

Whatever else you may think of him, Peter J. Peters made an outstanding, and not preachy at all, tape series called They and Us. It is likely the best tapes he ever made for our purposes.

One is especially good and contains a commencement speech by a law school dean on the above subject, which is remarkable.

If we had more archive space for attachments and for audio, I'd upload that one, if I could find it.
 
Old September 23rd, 2008 #39
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Did we cover Univ of Chicago, Epstein and the Jewish "Chicago School of Law and Economics?" The guys who helped lay the intellectual foundation for the snafus that have lead to the current trillion dollar bailout of Jewish operated wall st banks making its way through Congress sponsored by Jewish Ben Shalom Bernanke head of the Fed.

Here is an example of what Jewish partisans do in law school. Slander the Catholics, promote the Jews. Try to make sure that the Jewish profit / genocide operation called "freedom of choice" (to murder goyim babies in the womb) continues.

http://72.14.205.104/search?q=cache:...lnk&cd=1&gl=us

note this blog post date eh? Irony, the Jews always caballistically watch the numbers.

here is what the jew says:

Quote:
What, then, explains this decision? Here is a painfully awkward observation: All five justices in the majority in Gonzales are Catholic. The four justices who are either Protestant or Jewish all voted in accord with settled precedent. It is mortifying to have to point this out. But it is too obvious, and too telling, to ignore. Ultimately, the five justices in the majority all fell back on a common argument to justify their position. There is, they say, a compelling moral reason for the result in Gonzales. Because the intact D & E seems to resemble infanticide it is “immoral” and may be prohibited even without a clear statutory exception to protect the health of the woman.
Professor Stone, Stein, 99% likely Jewish
 
Old October 20th, 2008 #40
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The jew prides himself as an expert in law as well as experts in greed
 
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