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Old March 24th, 2017 #1
Alex Linder
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https://www.theguardian.com/environm...ersity-obriens

Couple donates bug collection worth $10m, a goldmine for researchers

Collection will help scientists piece together a large branch of insects’ family tree and be a resource for scientists who study natural controls on the environment
 
Old September 5th, 2017 #2
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Insects see in much better resolution than we thought


Insects see the world much differently from us, that much is clear. For the longest time, researchers thought they are unable to see fine images due to the way their eyes are built. Most insects have compound eyes which consist of many (up to thousands) tiny lens-capped ‘eye-units’. Together, these work to create a low resolution, pixelated image.

Contrasting to that, our own eyes have a single lens, a “megapixel camera” that can actively change the lens shape according to different needs and can keep both nearby and far away objects in sharp focus, based on our different needs. The end result of our eyes is a densely-packed, high-resolution image.

http://www.zmescience.com/science/bi...tter-05092017/
 
Old October 8th, 2017 #3
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DNA confirms amazing Australian isle insect not extinct after all


When black rats invaded Lord Howe Island after the 1918 wreck of the steamship Makambo, they wiped out numerous native species on the small Australian isle in the Tasman Sea including a big, flightless insect that resembled a stick.

But the Lord Howe Island stick insect, once declared extinct, still lives. Scientists said on Thursday DNA analysis of museum specimens of the bug and a similar-looking one from an inhospitable volcanic outcrop called Ball's Pyramid 14 miles (23 km) away confirmed they are the same species. The finding could help pave the way for its reintroduction in the coming years.

https://www.investing.com/news/gener...ter-all-537617
 
Old November 6th, 2017 #4
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7 New Giant Bug Species Are Extremely Aggressive

The newfound katydids are also among the biggest, bulkiest insects on Earth, a new study says.


Seven new species of katydids are among the largest and bulkiest insects in the world, a new study says.

Found only on the island of Madagascar, the bugs have the "biceps" of a bodybuilder and can be very aggressive—both surprising traits for katydids.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com.au...ggressive.aspx
 
Old November 13th, 2017 #5
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The Lord Howe stick insect is officially back from the dead

DNA evidence shows the insects survived what scientists thought was an extinction


It’s a rare triumph when a species comes back from the dead. A new genetic analysis has officially established what many entomologists and conservation biologists hoped was true: The Lord Howe stick insect (Dryococelus australis) lives.

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...ect-extinction
 
Old November 24th, 2017 #6
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Flies more germ-laden than suspected


Scientists have discovered that flies carry more diseases than suspected.

The house fly and the blowfly together harbour more than 600 different bacteria, according to a DNA analysis.

Many are linked with human infections, including stomach bugs, blood poisoning and pneumonia.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42113217
 
Old June 21st, 2018 #7
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Bogong moths use the Earth's magnetic field to get their bearings on long distance migrations


Each Spring, bogong moths emerge from beneath the soil of south-eastern Australia's plains and take to the air on the first leg of their annual migration, after spending the winter gorging themselves on plant roots to fuel up.

For a long time, scientists wondered how these moths — just a few centimetres long — made the incredible migration of over 1,000 kilometres to alpine caves in New South Wales and Victoria, and then back to their birthplace, to mate and reproduce in winter.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2...igrate/9886194
 
Old September 20th, 2018 #8
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Microplastics can spread via flying insects, research shows


Microplastic can escape from polluted waters via flying insects, new research has revealed, contaminating new environments and threatening birds and other creatures that eat the insects.

Scientists fed microplastics to mosquito larvae, which live in water, but found that the particles remained inside the animals as they transformed into flying adults.

https://www.theguardian.com/environm...research-shows
 
Old August 11th, 2021 #9
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Neonicotinoids Harm Bees at Far Below the Label Recommended Dose, Study Finds


Aug 10, 2021

Ornamental plant nurseries — with their high concentration of different flowers — are an important food source for pollinators. In fact, University of California (UC), Riverside entomologists Jacob Cecala and Erin E. Wilson Rankin counted more than 150 species of wild bees at nurseries in California alone.

Despite this, very little research has been done on how the pesticides often used at plant nurseries impact these crucial insects.

https://www.ecowatch.com/neonicotino...654615209.html
 
Old August 17th, 2021 #10
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Angry Bees Produce Richer, More Protein-Dense Venom, Study Finds


August 16, 2021

Chemists have analyzed protein diversity in venom produced by Apis mellifera ligustica in the marri (Corymbia calophylla) ecosystem in southern-western Australia.

Bee venom is the most valuable product produced by honeybees, with prices varying from $30.00 USD up to $300.00 per gram, depending on the purity, composition, and / or preparation of the product.

Though widely studied and used in alternative medicine, recent efforts in bee venom research have focused on its therapeutic and cosmetic applications, for the treatment of degenerative and infectious diseases.

http://www.sci-news.com/biology/bee-venom-09965.html
 
Old 4 Days Ago #11
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Deadly Pesticide Still Legal in U.S. Can Harm Bee Populations for Generations, Study Finds

Nov 23, 2021

A new study shows just how dangerous pesticides can be for bees.

The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America this month, found that bee populations can take a hit for generations if a bee is exposed just once to a common pesticide during its first year of life.

"Especially in agricultural areas, pesticides are often used multiple times a year and multiple years in a row," study lead author and University of California in Davis ecology Ph.D. candidate Clara Stuligross told The Guardian. "So this really shows us what that can actually mean for bee populations."

Stuligross and her team studied a type of bee called the blue orchard bee. These bees are about the size of a honeybee, but they live alone and have a blue, metallic color, National Geographic explained. They are also important pollinators for native U.S. wildflowers and crops like apples, cherries, almonds and peaches.

https://www.ecowatch.com/bee-populat...655783277.html
 
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