Vanguard News Network
VNN Media
VNN Digital Library
VNN Reader Mail
VNN Broadcasts

Old January 16th, 2018 #41
Ray Allan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 10,391
Ray Allan
Default

Thanks, Alex. I'm impressed by the high quality of these films. They got many details correct in regard to weapons, vehicles, uniforms, etc. both Soviet and German, where many Hollywood productions get it wrong. Most of the same military equipment was still in use in the 1960s when this movie was made. Also very few films in the West show the Russian perspective of the war.

I cannot imagine being in a war of such magnitude, I'm sure my chances of survival would have been very small. It makes a single human life seem very insignificant.
__________________
"Military men are dumb, stupid animals to be used as pawns for foreign policy."

--Henry A. Kissinger, jewish politician and advisor
 
Old January 16th, 2018 #42
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
Thanks, Alex. I'm impressed by the high quality of these films. They got many details correct in regard to weapons, vehicles, uniforms, etc. both Soviet and German, where many Hollywood productions get it wrong. Most of the same military equipment was still in use in the 1960s when this movie was made. Also very few films in the West show the Russian perspective of the war.

I cannot imagine being in a war of such magnitude, I'm sure my chances of survival would have been very small. It makes a single human life seem very insignificant.
Excuse me.
I thought that Mosfilm will be very careful when processing these movies.

Some of these movies have English subtitles, while others do not have them. I wrote several times to Mosfilm asking them to make subtitles for the second part, and then wrote to the Ministry of Culture. None of them answered me. So I do not know if my letters affected the advent of English subtitles in the second part of the movie.

For the third part there are subtitles but only Serbian
So I already wrote a letter to Mosfilm about the third part.
__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old July 10th, 2018 #43
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

I think that when Mosfilm will make the correct English subtitles for the third part, we will all be old enough

Therefore, I interrupt this series of movies and start showing other movies.





Evenings on a Farm Near Dikanka: The Night Before Christmas (1961)



Вечера на хуторе близ Диканьки: Ночь перед Рождеством (1961)



The cartoon - https://vnnforum.com/showpost.php?p=...5&postcount=51










The Night Before Christmas (Christmas Eve) - (1913)



Ночь перед Рождеством (1913)





__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old July 11th, 2018 #44
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

There are two more Soviet adaptations of this novel - (1937) and (1982). But for them there are no English subtitles.





Treasure Island (1971)



Остров сокровищ (1971)



The cartoon - https://vnnforum.com/showpost.php?p=...&postcount=202





__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old August 6th, 2018 #45
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Along Unknown Paths (1982)



Там, на неведомых дорожках (1982)




This is a fairy tale for children.

"Там, на неведомых дорожках" - this is a line from the poems of Alexander Pushkin.





__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old August 10th, 2018 #46
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

That was movie which Soviet schoolchildren watched instead of a movie The Terminator





Visitor from the Future (1985)



Гостья из будущего (1985)















__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln

Last edited by Alex Him; August 10th, 2018 at 02:22 PM.
 
Old August 10th, 2018 #47
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile











It's all
__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old August 11th, 2018 #48
Ray Allan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 10,391
Ray Allan
Default

I watched Episode 1. It reminds me a little of Doctor Who. I assume you watched this as a child? It is more positive-themed than The Terminator.
__________________
"Military men are dumb, stupid animals to be used as pawns for foreign policy."

--Henry A. Kissinger, jewish politician and advisor
 
Old August 12th, 2018 #49
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
I watched Episode 1. It reminds me a little of Doctor Who.
I did not watch Doctor Who.



Quote:
I assume you watched this as a child?
Yes, I watched it in my childhood.



Quote:
It is more positive-themed than The Terminator.
I think that the moviemakers in the US and the USSR set themselves different tasks.
__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old July 24th, 2020 #50
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Some links have become inactive.

With your permission, I will restore some of them.



D'Artagnan and Three Musketeers (1978)














__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln

Last edited by Alex Him; July 28th, 2020 at 07:13 AM.
 
Old July 28th, 2020 #51
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Dog Barbos and unusual cross (1961)



(Watching the movie is only possible on the channel of Mosfilm.)











Bootleggers (1961)



(Watching the movie is only possible on the channel of Mosfilm.)











---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------






White Sun of the Desert (1970)



(Watching the movie is only possible on the channel of Mosfilm.)











These are all movies that I was able to recover.

Other movies either disappeared from YouTube altogether or appeared there in better quality but without English subtitles.
__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old July 30th, 2020 #52
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Liberation (1968-1971)



Watching the movie is only possible on the channel of Mosfilm.



























__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old September 18th, 2020 #53
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Amphibian Man (Человек-амфибия) - (1961)



The movie is based on the novel of the same name by Alexandr Belyaev (1884-1942).





__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old October 14th, 2020 #54
Ray Allan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 10,391
Ray Allan
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Him View Post
Like I said in an earlier post, very good production values on these films, and historically accurate equipment, weapons, etc. The Soviet army probably assisted the film producers with a lot of this. In the last installment, 'Liberation: The Final Assault' I noticed the German Tiger I tanks appeared to be modified T-34s as the turret and suspension were not those of the actual Tiger. But I understand real Tigers were difficult to find 25 years after the war ended, and were only in museums. (Only a hard-core amateur military historian like me would probably notice this!) Also, the blonde Ukrainian soldier needs to put on a helmet. But the audience needed to recognize his character throughout the movie, so no helmet. This segment about the battle of Berlin was quite similar to the 2004 movie, Der Untergang (Downfall).
__________________
"Military men are dumb, stupid animals to be used as pawns for foreign policy."

--Henry A. Kissinger, jewish politician and advisor
 
Old October 14th, 2020 #55
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Allan View Post
Like I said in an earlier post, very good production values on these films, and historically accurate equipment, weapons, etc. The Soviet army probably assisted the film producers with a lot of this. In the last installment, 'Liberation: The Final Assault' I noticed the German Tiger I tanks appeared to be modified T-34s as the turret and suspension were not those of the actual Tiger. But I understand real Tigers were difficult to find 25 years after the war ended, and were only in museums. (Only a hard-core amateur military historian like me would probably notice this!) Also, the blonde Ukrainian soldier needs to put on a helmet. But the audience needed to recognize his character throughout the movie, so no helmet. This segment about the battle of Berlin was quite similar to the 2004 movie, Der Untergang (Downfall).
Well, since an attentive amateur military historian and fan of Soviet war movies has appeared here, then I will have more reasons to add them here

However, now I want to offer you a movie that I watched for the first time today and it is not about war.

This is a movie about several people who find themselves far from society. In this case, these are geologists.

(I don't know why its name was translated like this. Literally translated, it means: "An Unsent Letter")






Undelivered letter (Неотправленное письмо) - 1959.





Watching the movie is only possible on the channel of Mosfilm.



__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old October 14th, 2020 #56
steven clark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2,008
steven clark
Default Soviet movies

I just discovered this thread, and I find it informative on Soviet film. I lived in Boston for a few years, and was lucky enough to see a lot of Russian movies.

I especially liked one called The Kindergarten, written by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, and was a very thoughtful and human film about civilians in WWII Russia, and I thought it was a good view of Russian civilian life then, which we never see.
There was an odd bit when the movie stopped and a modern speech was given by Young Pioneers on peace and socialism. I assumed the authorities inserted it, but also you Russians have a much more sober view of war than we Americans.

As one Russian woman told me, where we American have one Memorial Day, Russia has a whole week of it.

I actually saw Yevtushenko in Boston, where he gave a poetry reading. It was quite an event, and, God, he was tall.

I also enjoyed a Russian film of King Lear by Grigori Kozintsev. There was also a film, Andrei Rublev, which I'm sure you heard of. Very beautiful.
Do you remember a film called Moscow doesn't believe in tears? A Russian comedy of sorts.

Also, I saw some old Russian silent films that had been locked up by the Bolsheviks, and were just unearthed in the 90's. They were made with silver, and were in excellent condition, and the films were really marvelous. Reminds us there was film in Russia before Eisenstein.

You say you don't like contemporary Russian film, although I like some. A film, Leviathan, came out a couple of years ago and could be seen as anti-society, but I thought it very stark, human, and tragic, set in Karelia.

I also liked a movie made in the 80's about Rasputin, and liked it. I understand in the USSR it was considered controversial because it showed the Czar as human, and did not do the usual communist line about him being ruthless.
 
Old October 15th, 2020 #57
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by steven clark View Post
I just discovered this thread, and I find it informative on Soviet film. I lived in Boston for a few years, and was lucky enough to see a lot of Russian movies.
I'm glad to read that many Soviet movies are shown in Boston.



Quote:
I especially liked one called The Kindergarten, written by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, and was a very thoughtful and human film about civilians in WWII Russia, and I thought it was a good view of Russian civilian life then, which we never see.
There was an odd bit when the movie stopped and a modern speech was given by Young Pioneers on peace and socialism. I assumed the authorities inserted it, but also you Russians have a much more sober view of war than we Americans.
This is the first time I know about the existence of such a movie.

But it's not surprising I'm not a movie buff.

Of course, the Russians have a different attitude to the war than the Americans, since it affected the whole country from top to bottom.



Quote:
As one Russian woman told me, where we American have one Memorial Day, Russia has a whole week of it.
She probably meant our May holidays.

May 1 is the day of workers' solidarity and May 9 is the victory day (and there are several days off between them).



Quote:
I actually saw Yevtushenko in Boston, where he gave a poetry reading. It was quite an event, and, God, he was tall.
I have not seen Yevtushenko personally, but I have a book of his poems.

In my opinion, he looks rather weak against the background of the great Russian poets both in terms of intelligence and in terms of poetry, but I do not intend to deny that he has some poetic spark.



Quote:
I also enjoyed a Russian film of King Lear by Grigori Kozintsev.
So far I have only posted here his movie "Hamlet", but now the link has become inactive.

"King Lear" I have not watched.



Quote:
There was also a film, Andrei Rublev, which I'm sure you heard of. Very beautiful.
Of course this is a very famous movie.

But from the work of director Andrei Tarkovsky, I watched only a movie "Stalker" (1979).



Quote:
Do you remember a film called Moscow doesn't believe in tears? A Russian comedy of sorts.
When I was a child, I actively watched children's Soviet movies, and when I became a teenager, then the opportunity to watch Hollywood movies appeared and I watched mostly them.

Therefore, I have not watched some famous Soviet movies intended more for adults than for children.

In particular, I have not watched a movie Moscow doesn't believe in tears.



Quote:
Also, I saw some old Russian silent films that had been locked up by the Bolsheviks, and were just unearthed in the 90's. They were made with silver, and were in excellent condition, and the films were really marvelous. Reminds us there was film in Russia before Eisenstein.
Here are some old movies that I posted:
"Moscow clad in snow" (1908)
Christmas Eve (1913)



Quote:
You say you don't like contemporary Russian film, although I like some. A film, Leviathan, came out a couple of years ago and could be seen as anti-society, but I thought it very stark, human, and tragic, set in Karelia.
It seems that this is the movie in which the modern Russian authorities do not care about the Russian people at all?

I have not watched this movie.



Quote:
I also liked a movie made in the 80's about Rasputin, and liked it. I understand in the USSR it was considered controversial because it showed the Czar as human, and did not do the usual communist line about him being ruthless.
Was that a movie "Agony" (1974)?

I haven't watched this movie.




__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old October 17th, 2020 #58
steven clark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2,008
steven clark
Default Soviet movies

Thanks for the title 'Agony.' I might see if I can find it somewhere.

Many, many years ago, we had Sunday afternoon TV featuring children's movies, and one was a Soviet adaptation of the O. Henry (American) story, The Ransom of Red Chief. It was unusual to see an American story done by Russians, but it was quite enjoyable.

It was always relaxed, Sundays. Now, it's just trashy and loud, like all American TV.

Of course also, the Soviets favored Jack London, since he was a socialist, and John Reed.

In Boston, there is actually a fairly large Russian community; many are Jews, but a lot of gentiles are there as well, and being an academic center, there are lots of university film series and 'art' house cinemas, or were; that might have changed.
 
Old October 19th, 2020 #59
Alex Him
Senior Member
 
Alex Him's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 6,192
Blog Entries: 218
Alex Him
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by steven clark View Post
Thanks for the title 'Agony.' I might see if I can find it somewhere.
In low quality and with not very good readable English subtitles built into the movie, this movie is here.





Agony



Watching the movie is only possible on the channel of Mosfilm.














Quote:
Many, many years ago, we had Sunday afternoon TV featuring children's movies, and one was a Soviet adaptation of the O. Henry (American) story, The Ransom of Red Chief. It was unusual to see an American story done by Russians, but it was quite enjoyable.
I have no other options except that it was a famous episode from the movie Businessmen (Деловые люди - 1962).

The episode you are writing about starts at 29:56. Unfortunately, there are no English subtitles.



Watching the movie is only possible on the channel of Mosfilm.









Quote:
It was always relaxed, Sundays. Now, it's just trashy and loud, like all American TV.

Of course also, the Soviets favored Jack London, since he was a socialist, and John Reed.
I have not read both of them and I have not watched movies based on their novels.



Quote:
In Boston, there is actually a fairly large Russian community; many are Jews, but a lot of gentiles are there as well, and being an academic center, there are lots of university film series and 'art' house cinemas, or were; that might have changed.
Thank you, Steven!

I don't know anything about Russian communities in the United States, except that there is a famous Russian district of Brighton Beach in New York.
__________________
Where should they dig the Very Deep Pit?
Piglet said that the best place would be somewhere where a Heffalump was, just before he fell into it, only about a foot farther on.
(c) Alan Alexander Miln
 
Old October 28th, 2020 #60
steven clark
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 2,008
steven clark
Default Soviet movies

Alex, I went to YouTube and was able to watch 'Agony.' I hadn't seen it in 33 years, and it was a lot of fun to watch and was as I remembered it.

When it was shown in Boston, critics enjoyed the newsreels interspaced with the action, and was very new, as we in the West know absolutely nothing about WWI in Russia.

I'm sure some of the scenes might have been lifted from earlier movies, though.

It was also good to see a period film in Russia with Russians, and not a not of English actors. It was also liked for giving a humane portrait of Nicholas II, although he was a mess as Czar, and the film showed what kind of mental chaos the leadership of Russia was at that point. The Bolsheviks really didn't have much of an enemy in that respect.

Also on Youtube I was browsing for a version of the German film Kolberg, and found one from the USSR made in 1943 about Kutusov. May look at that.
 
Reply

Share


Thread
Display Modes


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:42 AM.
Page generated in 0.12282 seconds.