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Old July 7th, 2012 #1
keifer
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Default Portable Preppers Stove by Stovetec

http://www.stovetec.net/us/index.php...156&Itemid=689
 
Old July 7th, 2012 #2
Steven L. Akins
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I wonder if the fact that the popularity of camping has significantly declined significantly over the past 30 years has much to do with the promotion of "doomsday preppers" related products such as Coleman stoves and lanterns, and other outdoor gear???
 
Old July 7th, 2012 #3
keifer
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I feel like there is a shift lately in the idea of bug-out to the notion of bug-in. People are realizing the realities are what they are in that a person can not carry enough water they will need for just a week. Even if that's all they carry, forget about ammo and other needed items.
My definition of doomsday is in the difference between government representation and presence such as law enforcement ,military which is contrasted with these government figures leaving their posts so as to protect their own families and property. This is when people will behave in such a way that there are no ramifications for their behavior.
I make frequent trips to the desert with the idea of "What-If?", and aside from the fact that it is humbling, it is also a bit demoralizing at times when the realities of negotiating the environment will eventually over power the best trained and strongest out there. How far can I actually get? The desert hates you. Nature owes you nothing. You can't throw a bunch of gear at the problem.
If you notice in most videos about prepping;"This is my Bug-Out Bag" type of content, you will notice that the gear is always new, most of the gear is the same amount of newness, and the majority of the self described preppers are only that in theory. "This is my survival knife": complete with no scratches, the leather sheath unscathed. Any trek in the desert with 105 temps will cause a person to rethink the notion of 'Gotta have all the right gear". The frame of mind quickly becomes "What can I live without?" in terms of all that cool gear.
I got one of these stoves and will do a review on it soon. As far as Bug- Out it is too heavy, and not needed because it can be replicated in the wild. This stove has some limitations for Bug-In as well in that if you fire this up, or any other outdoor grill cooking device, then everyone down wind will beat a path to your door looking for that sirloin and anything else you got. Prepping is about options. Survival is about skill.
 
Old July 7th, 2012 #4
Steven L. Akins
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keifer View Post
If you notice in most videos about prepping;"This is my Bug-Out Bag" type of content, you will notice that the gear is always new, most of the gear is the same amount of newness, and the majority of the self described preppers are only that in theory. "This is my survival knife": complete with no scratches, the leather sheath unscathed."
Hence my suspicion that the Jewish TV moguls who are capitalizing on (mostly White) paranoia with shows like "Doomsday Preppers" are in the business of selling not only their own "reality programs" but are fueling the lagging market for camping goods, which Jews like Joe H. Schmidt, president and CEO of Dick's Sporting Goods, and David Gochman, Chairman and CEO of Academy Sports and Outdoors, are only too happy to sell to the bug-outers.

Last edited by Steven L. Akins; July 7th, 2012 at 01:54 PM.
 
Old July 24th, 2012 #5
MikeQuigley
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I've been running around like a chicken with it's head cut off for a few years now. First I started with guns and ammo, then the emergency food, and over the last year it's been prepping for plan B, bug out.I have so much shit now I had to go buy a little wagon to help me drag this crap out in the woods. I'm in southern New Jersey which is pretty forrested, but nothing like alot of the other states. I feel like it wouldn't be long before the authorities or bad guys would see my campfire and come'a knock'n. I don't know what to do any more.
 
Old July 24th, 2012 #6
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By the way that is a cool little stove but it's basically a rocket stove. I've built a couple already and actually just threw them out because I'm not going to use it in the house, and if I bug out I'll be making a campfire. I also bought a Kelly's Kettle, and a couple little folding stoves which are only good for boiling a cup of water for some tea or soup. The Kelly's Kettle is about the best of the bunch, which is still a rocket stove except a little more cleverly thought out.
 
Old July 24th, 2012 #7
Steven L. Akins
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeQuigley View Post
I've been running around like a chicken with it's head cut off for a few years now. First I started with guns and ammo, then the emergency food, and over the last year it's been prepping for plan B, bug out.I have so much shit now I had to go buy a little wagon to help me drag this crap out in the woods. I'm in southern New Jersey which is pretty forrested, but nothing like alot of the other states. I feel like it wouldn't be long before the authorities or bad guys would see my campfire and come'a knock'n. I don't know what to do any more.
You sound like you are fairly well equipped, so I wouldn't fret too much about what might or might not happen. Our government has already been taken over, so I really don't see them as the threat, they are already where they want to be - running things.

The real collapse will come if the government can't send out all those checks that go out to Social Security, disability, welfare and foodstamp recepients. If that ever happens, then it will be complete and utter anarchy of the sort this country has never before seen. Stores will be looted en-mass and the National Guard will be called out and bullets will be fired against angry, desperate, mobs.
 
Old July 24th, 2012 #8
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This stove works well. It is built well. But I can't really find a place where it fits into the scheme of things. It weighs about 30 pounds, so packing it is out of the question. It requires constant attention for the fire. It requires specific diameter of wood, about the size of a woman's fist or smaller. I am not sure what it will do that can't be done with something like The Dakota Fire Pit. I suppose if ya had a log cabin then this stove would look good sitting on the porch. Bad weather might be where this stove earns its weight and the fact that it will securely support a iron skillet.
Here are some links on stealth fire making.
The Dakota Fire Pit.

Stealth Fire.
 
Old February 24th, 2013 #9
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Biolite camp stove. From burning bio mass like wood, this portable stove is capable of charging batteries and any device with a USB cord.
 
Old February 28th, 2013 #10
Mr A.Anderson
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Call me old fashioned, or just plain simple. I've cooked on these many times as a kid. They work, and they work well. Lightweight, readily available, and you can fold the "dampers" back into place, and use it as a storage container to make it even more space efficient in your pack.

Why re-invent the wheel?


Last edited by Mr A.Anderson; February 28th, 2013 at 10:39 PM.
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #11
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I couldn't agree with you more Mr Anderson.
Just an added note, when making these Hobo stoves and it's cousin the "Billiy Can", some cans have an added coating on the inside walls of the can. I see this most often in pasta sauce cans, which are otherwise sturdy constructions. I don't know the affects of that burn off from the coating, but it seems like something to avoid when cooking food.
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #12
Mr A.Anderson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keifer View Post
I couldn't agree with you more Mr Anderson.
Just an added note, when making these Hobo stoves and it's cousin the "Billiy Can", some cans have an added coating on the inside walls of the can. I see this most often in pasta sauce cans, which are otherwise sturdy constructions. I don't know the affects of that burn off from the coating, but it seems like something to avoid when cooking food.
Didn't think of that, I've always used coffee cans which have no coating. I suppose that it would be relatively easy to burn off the coating on a dry run to prep the can.
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #13
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Originally Posted by Mr A.Anderson View Post
Call me old fashioned, or just plain simple. I've cooked on these many times as a kid. They work, and they work well. Lightweight, readily available, and you can fold the "dampers" back into place, and use it as a storage container to make it even more space efficient in your pack.

Why re-invent the wheel?

The Original Hobo Stove - YouTube
Lets take a closer look at this guys stove by comparing it to a Billy-Can.
A Billy-can is a metal can with a wire handle attached at the open end of the can at the rim. Small holes can be punched through along the open rim to allow the critical component oxygen to the fire.
The stove in this video has two functions, one that it provides a barrier for the fire from the elements, and two it has a flat surface to cook on. The same barrier aspects can be used in reverse in that the barrier protects the elements from the fire as in the scenario of utilizing this stove inside a tent with proper ventilation. Other than that, what remains of this tool is that it provides a fire resistant platform for a second tool like a pan or Billycan.
Now consider that a Billycan will do everything just mentioned and attributed to the tin can stove. However, once the stove was made, the tin can material altered, it ceased to exist as a container. The stove in and of itself can not purify water. Flame and a fire resistant container is what purifies water by boiling. In this case the stove only functions as a platform for a second container, in which case increases the complexity of your system. A Billycan acts as a barrier from elements, contains and boils water, provides storage for water, has a flat cooking surface as well as vessel type containment for cooking. More uses, less complex.

Also, I am not so sure about his method of punching holes in the flat surface for bacon grease run off. For the same reason that the grease would hype up the fire, the grease should be saved and used as an enabler for the next fire. If a person is in such a situation that their life hangs in balance over a tin can, then most certainly preserving animal fat for the resource that it is would be paramount. Animal fat has many uses like making candles, a rust inhibitor for metal objects like fire arms and knives, as well as bait for animals, and of course as the most significant source of calories. Animal fat be rendered, stored and contained in a Billycan, but the stove in this video, as a single tool, can do none of these things.
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #14
Mr A.Anderson
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So,

This conversation has made me break out the various tin cans.........

How about a "Hobo Billy"? Trying to work it out to see how feasible, how far down the can I can cut dampeners and still allow enough air flow/gas escape, so when turned right side up and used as a Billy, it has more capacity.

I figure that if you are using the 33 oz (weight) coffee can (the big one), if you cut the dampeners where the top of the hole (as a hobo, bottom of the hole as a Billy) is at the mid point of the can, that will give you a couple ounces short of 6 cup volume if you use it as a Billy.

As it is now, I've been able to make a Hobo, where my billy can fits extremely snug inside (a perfect fit). They are odd sized cans. The Billy has 3 1/2 cup capacity, and the hobo is a 48 oz can.

I also made a corrugated fiber board wick cooking candle using a tuna fish can.

All three fit inside each other quite nicely. But because they are odd sized cans, they have no lids.
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #15
Mr A.Anderson
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My idea is slightly different. When I work out the kinks, I'll make and post a video of it.
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #16
keifer
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A Guyot Nalgene stainless steel bottle is a manufactured Billycan, damn near bulletproof. There are other sources of gear that are designed explicitly with the Billycan design. The company Zebra makes a highly respected version of the Billycan. If all you have is one tin can, do not punch holes in it, the ability to purify water by means of boil is far more important than any other priority. If you have two tin cans, then make a stove out of the second can.


 
Old March 1st, 2013 #18
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I am so making one of those tomorrow!
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #19
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There small as hell and work pretty good too. If you make sure that you use high temp sealant(automotive red or orange RTV sealant works good)they last almost forever.
 
Old March 1st, 2013 #20
Mr A.Anderson
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How long will the fiberglass filler last, I wonder?
 
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